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Vue is the world's first pair of smart glasses that are designed for everyday use. Offered in prescription, plano, and sunglasses.
Vue is the world's first pair of smart glasses that are designed for everyday use. Offered in prescription, plano, and sunglasses.
Created by
10,410 backers pledged $2,215,583 to help bring this project to life.

Recent updates

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January Update: Full Production

Posted by Vue (Creator)
101 likes

Hey backers!

We’d like to wish everyone a Happy New Year! We think 2019 is going to be a big year for connected eyewear, and we’re excited to share that with you all. As mentioned in our previous update, we knew January was going to be a busy month due to all the work we had slated to get done prior to the Chinese New Year shutdown. Let’s dive in!

Production

This has been our most exciting month yet. Our full production line is up and running, and we’ve been watching units go all the way into final packaging! We’d like to walk everyone through the entire process, discuss where we’re at, what we finished prior to CNY, and what we’ll pick up after.

Production starts by making most of the smaller components, including our electronics and housings. The frames, for example, are made at our injection molding facility where they are molded, trimmed, polished, painted, and dried. One of the first steps is to trim off excess material from the parts and perform a brief quality inspection. 

Trimming material and quality inspection
Trimming material and quality inspection

Once these parts have finished the post-processing work, they are painted in large batches and sent to a drying rack.  

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The other components, including the legs, are sent through their own painting and drying process as well.   

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Once the housing is manufactured, processed, and inspected, they are sent to our assembly factory where they are staged for assembly along with the electronics.  

Charging case housing staged for assembly
Charging case housing staged for assembly

The actual assembly process is what has been taking up the bulk of our time in the past several months. While each individual component of the glasses (like the frames, legs, or electronics) contain their own engineering and manufacturing challenges in and of themselves, the act of assembling all of those pieces into the final product is quite complex.

As the saying goes, practice makes perfect, and it is through training, mistakes, and learning from those mistakes that ultimately the product comes to fruition. Though challenging, it’s been rewarding to better understand the process and to see our manufacturing partners work with us to bring Vue to life!

Below you'll see a section of the production line assembling legs for the glasses.

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The following video is of the charging case assembly line, which is also up and running from start to finish.

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Throughout the assembly process, there are also a few different inspection and testing points where we look for defects and test functionality. This includes anything from scratches on the frames to the ability of the glasses to pair via Bluetooth.

Once the glasses are inspected and the lenses inserted, each pair of Vue glasses is given its own charging case and is placed into packaging. Once it's in its packaging, it is sent to a machine where a protective film is applied.

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Once the protective film has been applied, each Vue box is placed into a shipping box.

Vue’s official shipping box coming off the assembly line!
Vue’s official shipping box coming off the assembly line!

From here, labels are scanned, shipping labels printed, and the boxes are staged in the shipping area where they are sent off to our courier, and ultimately, to all of you! This is a high-level overview of the process from start to finish, and it’s been awesome to see the production line truly come to life and become fully functional from start to finish throughout January. 

Remaining Challenges

Though the production line is now fully operational, there were still a few bumps in the process that need adjusting. Namely, we found that our glue fixture's tolerances were off. Occasionally, the dispensing nozzle would collide with part of the glasses and damage the tip. When the glue nozzle is damaged, it’s unable to perform any dispensing accurately and thus production is halted until it is fixed.  

Damaged dispensing needle on the glue machine
Damaged dispensing needle on the glue machine
Team inspecting the tolerances of the glue machine
Team inspecting the tolerances of the glue machine

We've ordered an adjusted fixture to be made to ensure that the clearance remains sufficient throughout production. There were a few other issues we found during production—including kinked wires or shorted electronics—though these are resolved by revising our assembly instructions and re-training operators. 

Timelines

Of the first 1000 units, we opted to make the “Classic - Carbon Fiber” units first as those were the most popular. Doing this would keep production less confusing during our first batch. We actually finished some of these units, but due to a translation error with our lens factory, we received lenses cut for Trendy frames instead of Classic. It’s a really small detail, but sometimes when you are rushing to get things done, small things go unnoticed. With the CNY holiday break, we won’t get lenses re-cut until mid-February. 

This means early backers can expect their units to be shipping next month. We’ll continue to reach out to backers via email to lock down addresses and prescriptions, and we’ll provide tracking numbers once able. 

The full schedule of shipping will become clearer next month once we pick up production again and run production with some of the above mentioned issues fixed. We’ll then have a better understanding of throughput which we’ll use to put timelines on everyone else’s units. 

Support 

Reach us at support@enjoyvue.com with any questions, and remember the following before emailing:

  • The quickest way for us to help is by emailing support@enjoyvue.com
  • To change your shipping address, email support@enjoyvue.com.
  • We are still accepting prescription changes at support@enjoyvue.com
  • We are no longer accepting changes to frame styles, colors, or lens types. 
  • You absolutely must send the email using the email that you originally used to make the pledge. For example, we cannot provide account access if you originally used “____@gmail.com” but now you email us from “____@yahoo.com”. If you don’t do this, we’ll just ask you to email us using the other email and it will extend the time it takes to assist you!

We receive hundreds more emails than normal immediately after posting updates, so we apologize if it takes longer than expected for us to get back to you!

Until next time! 

With love, 

the Vue team

December Update: Finishing 2018 Strong

Posted by Vue (Creator)
85 likes

Hey backers!

Happy holidays to those celebrating around the world, and we wish everyone a very happy New Year as we move into 2019! We’ve been wrapping up 2018 by forging ahead on our various production tasks, and we wanted to take a moment to thank all of our backers for hanging in there with us throughout this journey! It wouldn't be possible to get this far without you and we are thankful for your support! Let’s dive into December's update! 

Production Progress 

Work on adhesive procedures continued into December and went well. We decided to build additional fixtures to help further streamline the process of applying adhesive during production. Fixtures, though fairly quick to make, still require a lot of design and review before they are made as they are quite critical pieces of equipment. For example, in the fixture below, holes were added that make the fixture considerably lighter and therefore easier to handle during production. Moreover, fixtures are typically built out of robust materials so that they can remain on the line for long periods of time, likely helping to produce tens of thousands of units.

Additional fixture for the legs of the glasses
Additional fixture for the legs of the glasses

After testing the new adhesive procedures with the new fixtures, we are happy to say that the glued components meet our functional specifications! Vue’s size and structural requirements have posed quite a few challenges for us as we’ve worked toward manufacturing, but we’re happy to have finally arrived at a robust solution for bonding the parts during assembly. We’ve performed a series of functional reviews on the parts and they are looking good.

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Reviewing the finalized adhesive properties

Note that you should not bend or twist the glasses as you see us doing in the video—treat your glasses carefully! This is just a demonstration that showcases that the work we’ve put into solving our assembly and adhesive problems seems robust.

We also have finalized the matte texturizing that is applied to the various parts of the glasses. This work was nearly complete but had been put on the sideline for a bit while we focused our efforts on our assembly issues.

Finalized matte texture
Finalized matte texture

Practice assembly work continues with our factories. Now with the adhesive procedures locked in, the efficiency of assembly is greatly improving and the production line is looking much closer to a true mass production line. From here on out, we'll be focused on practice runs rather than big technical hurdles. 

We’ve got a tight schedule ahead of us after the international new year, as we will be working to get first units out the door before Chinese New Year. We’ll keep you posted!

App

Work on the app has continued and we are finishing off final touches now before submitting final versions to their respective app stores! The app will continue to be updated before and after backers receive their glasses, and we’ll rely on feedback from all of you to improve the experience! We're looking forward to getting your feedback from real-world use. 

Below is a brief scroll through the main app sections.

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Brief scroll through the app

In addition to being able to stream audio from your phone, another main feature set with the glasses is the ability to track steps taken throughout the day. You can set your double-tap gesture to hear your step and calorie count for the day, or you can go into the app to see the totals in graphical format. If you adjust your step goal in the app's settings, the circular graph on the activity tab of the app will adjust its progress accordingly, as seen in the demo video below. 

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Step count graph and adjusting step goal

In addition to the core features most backers are familiar with, we also have a few experimental features that we touched briefly on during the campaign. These will likely be buggy as they haven’t been our main priority with the app, but they are included in case backers want to test them out. We’re looking forward to hearing what you think of the app and what features you’d like to see! Once the apps are live in their respective app stores, we will let you know.

Branding + Photography 

Though this journey has taken a while, it truly is just the beginning! Thanks to all of our wonderful backers, we will have managed to launch a new product. In the long term, we hope and plan on being a major player in the emerging connected eyewear space. We stand a chance to shift the global eyewear market toward connected products, and your feedback will help determine how those products look and function.

In anticipation of this next big phase, we’ve been working to refresh our branding. We’ve recently had the chance to take new photography with the glasses, and will be publishing a lot of these assets across our social media and in our soon-to-be revamped website.

Sunglasses versions of Vue Classic (left) and Vue Trendy (right)
Sunglasses versions of Vue Classic (left) and Vue Trendy (right)
Vue Trendy in Ink Black
Vue Trendy in Ink Black
Vue + charging case
Vue + charging case
Vue labeling
Vue labeling

These pictures are just a sneak peak, and we have more to come. You’ll begin to see this branding roll out as soon as we start shipping.

Timelines

We're now entirely focused on our practice assembly runs, and ensuring that the production line can consistently produce quality glasses. The assembly lines are being staged with the necessary components to assemble the first 1000 units (and more). Once we achieve satisfactory results with our practice runs, we'll kickoff a production run with the staged components and begin shipping immediately. 

Many of you will be receiving emails to update your prescriptions (if you haven't already), as we are currently sending lens data to our lens partner to begin manufacturing batches of lenses by the thousands. Full-steam ahead!

Support 

Reach us at support@enjoyvue.com with any questions, and remember the following before emailing: 

  • The quickest way for us to help is by emailing support@enjoyvue.com
  • To change your shipping address, email support@enjoyvue.com
  • We are still accepting prescription changes at support@enjoyvue.com
  • We are no longer accepting changes to frame styles, colors, or lens types. 
  • You absolutely must send the email using the email that you originally used to make the pledge. For example, we cannot provide account access if you originally used “____@gmail.com” but now you email us from “____@yahoo.com”. If you don’t do this, we’ll just ask you to email us using the other email and it will extend the time it takes to assist you! 

We receive hundreds more emails than normal immediately after posting updates, so we apologize if it takes longer than expected for us to get back to you! 

Until next time! 

With love (and happy new year!), 

the Vue team

November Update: Making Progress

Posted by Vue (Creator)
69 likes

Hey backers! 

Hope everyone had a pleasant month of November! Production work continued throughout the month and we've been able to complete training with our factory as planned as well as resolve most of our issues. Unfortunately, a few hurdles remain that we're working to clear. Let's dive in to the details.

Production 

We’re happy to say that most of the optimization, inspection, and training activities have been going quite smoothly. We’ve managed to iron out a lot of quality issues with practice. We’re really thrilled with how the glasses are looking as we get closer to the end of this journey!

Production samples of Classic and Trendy (shot just this week!)
Production samples of Classic and Trendy (shot just this week!)

Each practice run has been showing marked improvement, and assembly work is starting to speed up considerably, which bodes well for higher volume manufacturing runs as we work on shipping all rewards.

Partially assembled frames from a recent trial run
Partially assembled frames from a recent trial run
Partially assembled legs from a recent trial run
Partially assembled legs from a recent trial run

In particular, charging case assembly is looking great, and it looks like assembly will be able to keep pace with the glasses, or will be done well in advance.

Partially assembled charging cases from a recent trial run
Partially assembled charging cases from a recent trial run

The bigger challenge for us has been optimizing the adhesive procedures, which we noted in our previous update was one area that had slowed us down. Vue’s dimensions are quite small, so the process must be very precise. As we mentioned in the October update, an obvious quality standard that we maintain is that the glue that is applied by the machine during production should not seep through any seams in the product. It’s a tough balance to maintain—too little glue and the bonding is not strong enough, whereas too much may seep out as seen below.

Units that do not meet our quality spec
Units that do not meet our quality spec

There has been a considerable amount of fine tuning for this process. The amount of glue that is laid down onto the parts depends on a lot of factors, but most critically it depends on the speed of the adhesive flow, the speed of the dispensing head, and the diameter of the dispensing needle. Unfortunately, it isn’t always simply a matter of adjusting the settings. In our case, some of the machines we used simply were not able to perform with the level of precision we required.

Due to this, we ended up evaluating several other machines our factory had available, and ultimately ended up ordering custom equipment that could perform to our specifications. With the tweaking, testing, and ordering of a new machine, this added weeks of work that we weren’t anticipating.

Unpacking new custom production equipment
Unpacking new custom production equipment
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Evaluating a precision glue machine

A good chunk of November was spent evaluating these new procedures and machines and then validating them. We also had to create entirely new fixtures for the new machine to help properly place the frames beneath the dispensing head as well as clamp the pieces together after they’ve been glued. 

New clamping fixture created for gluing process
New clamping fixture created for gluing process

During the last week of November, we ran through the new equipment and procedures and will be evaluating those units shortly. Once the gluing adjustments have been validated, everything will be in place for full production.

We think it’s important to eliminate as many of these issues as we can before shipping so that backers have the best product possible. This first generation of Vue that you are all helping to launch will be the first of many generations of product, and your valuable feedback is going to directly help shape how Vue seeks to change the global eyewear market. We know the wait for some of these details is tiresome, but we want you all with us for the long haul, and we think these details will be important for that!

In anticipation of advancing to full production, our lens factory has been finishing lenses and shipping them to our assembly factory, where they will wait to be installed into each backer’s frame.

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A pair of lenses being inspected and passed down the line for shipping

The lens manufacturing has been far more straightforward than the frames, so we’ve had no hiccups in the process thus far. Most of the processes for lens manufacturing are well established and automated, meaning the process is predictable and controlled.

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Automated lens production

In the above video, the machine is actually cutting a lens to shape. Once finished, the lens is dropped into its corresponding tray and moved down its conveyor system. You can then see the next lens be picked up by the machine where it will go through the same process. It’s pretty impressive to see some of this advanced equipment in action!

We’ve also started to prepare for our second production batch for the units beyond the first 1000. As you may recall from previous updates, the PCBs for the first 1000 have already been completed and are already at our assembly factory waiting for final assembly. We’re aiming to time it so that we can start work on our second batch as the first units are shipping out.

We recently received our next batch of over 8000 PCBs. Once the first production batch is running, we’ll have the PCBs go through SMT, and they’ll immediately be ready for the next production batch.

Latest PCB shipment for Batch 2
Latest PCB shipment for Batch 2

We've been putting the finishing touches on this update after another long day at the factory, and will be back at it again after posting! We'll continue to keep you updated on progress as we get closer to the finish line. 

Timelines 

We acknowledge that we’ve been too optimistic with these previous few updates. Production work has been really busy, but also really exciting. Being in the factory and seeing so many units come to life is what we’ve been waiting for throughout this journey, and in our eagerness we’ve been too quick to assume the best. We haven’t been factoring in buffer to account for some of these issues. Because of this, we don’t want to lead backers on that we can ship these out in December. Instead, we’re going to plan on January. We really do apologize for the delays, and we hope that the details in our updates provides clarity on our progress. If we are able to get units out earlier, we’ll certainly let you know. But we’d rather set expectations that first units will go out around mid-January, then will pick up again in late February after Chinese New Year.

Support 

Reach us at support@enjoyvue.com with any questions, and remember the following before emailing:

  • The quickest way for us to help is by emailing support@enjoyvue.com
  • To change your shipping address, email support@enjoyvue.com.
  • We are still accepting prescription changes at support@enjoyvue.com.
  • We are no longer accepting changes to frame styles, colors, or lens types. 
  • You absolutely must send the email using the email that you originally used to make the pledge. For example, we cannot provide account access if you originally used “____@gmail.com” but now you email us from “____@yahoo.com”. If you don’t do this, we’ll just ask you to email us using the other email and it will extend the time it takes to assist you!

We receive hundreds more emails than normal immediately after posting updates, so we apologize if it takes longer than expected for us to get back to you!

Until next time! 

With love, 

the Vue team

October Update: Refining The Process

Posted by Vue (Creator)
73 likes

Hey Backers! 

Welcome to another monthly update! Last time we left off we were covering production, the hurdles associated with this first batch, and the remaining work left to be done. This month has been more of the same work, so let’s dive into what we’ve been up to.

Production 

Production work continued throughout October for the first 1000 units. The process has been slower than we want it to be, and we’ve had to make additional updates to our fixtures on the assembly line to help facilitate the process. The training and practice sessions have been a great learning experience and the process has been improving each time. Due to the small dimensions of the product, some assembly steps can be tricky. Though the team has grown accustomed to assembling devices ourselves, it’s taken more time than we would have hoped to train the factory staff on those procedures. Moreover, scaling up such assembly processes has been tedious, though we are still making good progress.

Much of the work we’ll cover in this update will be similar to the last update, which is to be expected. For the most part, production prep has been going well, as much of the assembly process is straightforward, like leg assembly. 

The first steps in the process—assembling the legs
The first steps in the process—assembling the legs

Other steps have proven to be more difficult, such as gluing components together. One of the challenges of using an adhesive is ensuring that enough material is dispensed to properly fix the parts together while also ensuring that the adhesive doesn’t seep through the seams in the part. We have a quality standard defined to ensure that the glue is precisely dispensed to necessary locations to ensure a strong bond, while also not dripping onto any external parts of the device and drying there.

This process is controlled through automated equipment, a defined procedure, as well as quality inspections after the process is completed. Setting these specifications, training the staff, and assembling the components is all part of the validation process for the finished device. Because this particular step involves a lot of handling, it’s taken more time to get right.

Frames drying after the adhesive has been applied
Frames drying after the adhesive has been applied

During the assembly process, the device changes hands many times. One risk associated with such handling is an electrostatic discharge (ESD). We won’t go into a lot of technical detail about ESD, but it’s essentially a static shock. Those frustrating little shocks you get when you touch a metal object in dry weather might occur on an assembly line too, and those can actually break the circuitry in our electronics. You’ll notice in some of our footage and pictures that assembly operators have a wristband connected to a cable. This wristband connects the operator to an electrical ground, which prevents them from generating an ESD while handling the components, thus preventing any components from breaking. These are some of the controls that are put in place during assembly to help ensure quality.

An example of an ESD wristband
An example of an ESD wristband

We’ve also been working to make sure all our quality requirements are clearly established and articulated through our SOPs, and that all assembly staff are sufficiently trained. A lot of time this involves looking at reject units which don’t meet our standards, and comparing them directly with a unit that meets our standard. During our practice assembly runs, we’re constantly taking units off the line to evaluate them and use them as examples to bolster our various standards. 

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Assessing the quality of a leg assembly
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Looking over full assemblies

We’ve also been carefully documenting mistakes that we’ve found so we can clarify quality standards, or create new ones where needed. One such example was the touch pad’s adherence to the inside of the arms of the glasses. If the component wasn’t placed correctly, the edge of the panel would lift up, thus affecting the responsiveness of the touch panel.

Touch panel lifting from the wall of the arms
Touch panel lifting from the wall of the arms

We’ve created several feedback documents for our factory where we compile these issues and help train the staff against any new quality standards. Though often times the fixes that need to be implemented are straightforward, it can take a lot of time to properly document them and articulate them in a way that enables clear and thorough training.

A recent compilation of quality control images
A recent compilation of quality control images

Beyond the inspections and quality standards, we’ve also been working to create new or improve existing fixtures that assist the production process. Below, you will see a new fixture that helps to speed up the inspection of assembled units.

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A demo of a new production fixture

After a unit is fully assembled, the glasses are placed over the device as seen in the video. The device then connects to the glasses over Bluetooth to ensure that connectivity is working. It then runs a series of checks to ensure the various sensors are functioning properly. After passing these QC checks, the device assigns a unique serial number to the glasses. This is one of several full-system tests that are performed that helps ensure functionality after assembly. This fixture now has a permanent home on the assembly line and enables quick testing of firmware on the devices.

Other than process improvements like the ones described above, the production line continues to hum along as it prepares for first units to ship out. The work we’ve put in thus far is starting to shape up. Though not quite as fast as we (and certainly all our backers) would have hoped, this will help ensure product stability in the long run, which will better prepare Vue and all of you awesome backers for our post-Kickstarter future together.

Timelines 

Unfortunately, given that training has gone slower than expected, we weren’t able to hit the October goal we set for ourselves. Judging by the pace of production work, we anticipate needing 1-2 additional practice runs before units are ready. Based on the current rate of assembly, the issues we’ve encountered, and the availability of our factory, our best estimate is that this will take a matter of weeks, thereby enabling us to get first units out the door in November. However, the challenge with setting timelines is that even small hiccups take many days to rework. Not only do we have to halt the assembly line in order to resolve issues, but we then have to reschedule training and practice runs around the factory’s existing schedule. We chose a quality factory that we trust, but this also means they have higher-volume clients and we are not always their first priority.

We’ll keep working diligently to get the units out as soon as possible. With this latest round of production work, we believe most major issues are now out of the way.

Updates 

We want to acknowledge that we see some of you asking for more frequent updates. We’ll work on seeing how feasible this is. More frequent updates would likely be shorter on content as they are focused on a smaller window of time. Updates take a lot of time to write, and when we are so focused on production, taking time out to post more frequent updates would mean deviating our schedules and focus.

We understand that it’s frustrating to have to wait an entire month before getting a comprehensive update, so we’ll look at the month of November to try to see if there is a way to post more frequently.

Support

Reach us at support@enjoyvue.com with any questions, and remember the following before emailing: 

  • The quickest way for us to help is by reaching out to support@enjoyvue.com.
  • We are no longer accepting changes to frame styles, colors, or lens types.
  • We are still accepting last minute prescription changes at support@enjoyvue.com
  • If you are emailing us to ask about your pledge, you must send the email using the email that you originally used to make the pledge. For example, we cannot provide account access if you originally used “____@gmail.com” but now you email us from “____@yahoo.com”. 
  • If you were charged for upgrades, it may have shown up on your statement as our company name "Vigo" instead of "Vue Glasses". Please do not dispute this with your credit card company. Please email us to verify the charge. 

We receive hundreds more emails than normal immediately after posting updates, so we apologize if it takes longer than expected for us to get back to you! 

Until next time! 

With love, 

the Vue team

September Update: Factory Days

Posted by Vue (Creator)
86 likes

Hey backers!

It’s been our busiest month of production work yet! Most of our day-to-day work has shifted substantially into supporting production. This involves everything from training assembly staff at our factories, modifying assembly instruction documents, and performing quality inspections on finished units. Let’s dive in!

Production Training

The first true production batch is always the most time-consuming. Since it is the first time our factory will be attempting to assemble thousands upon thousands of units, there is a lot of work that has to be done to ensure production is efficient and delivers quality units. We wanted to walk you through the work behind-the-scenes so backers have a better understanding of how their rewards are being created.

As we mentioned in previous updates, we’ve prepared instructions that will be used on the assembly line. Now that we've finalized those documents, we had a big meeting with our factory where we poured over the documents, ensuring they were clear, aligned with the factory’s practices, and accurately represented the product itself. This meeting took up an entire day at our factory where we collected feedback and made modifications to our procedures.

Production planning meeting
Production planning meeting

Throughout the development process, we’ve also engaged with our factory for smaller, practice assembly runs in order to get feedback on the design and assembly process. These runs are typically done with a few members of the assembly staff and without highly specialized equipment that would be required during mass production.

Now that we’re in the production phase, our assembly lines are fully set up with both assembly staff and production equipment. This means our factory has designed and built a custom assembly line and installed fixtures that are tailor-made for Vue.

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Custom fixture made just for Vue, used to add glue to precise locations during assembly

After inspecting the assembly line to make sure everything was in place—including our assembly instructions, fixtures, and components—we performed practice assembly runs using the complete production environment.

Many stations on the line have a receiving area where batches of components are delivered and documented. Toward the beginning of the line, the PCBs are delivered to a receiving station. 

A batch of 36 PCBs delivered to the assembly area
A batch of 36 PCBs delivered to the assembly area

Here, the production staff scan the barcodes affixed to the boards, thereby recording their use in production. This triggers the printing of a new barcode which travels with the product through the entire production process. Barcodes are often used for traceability purposes, and often contain important information including date of manufacture, batch number, and more.

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Scanning PCBs and printing their production barcodes
Printed barcodes from a PCB batch
Printed barcodes from a PCB batch

Once a barcode is printed, it is placed into a tray that will travel with the unique set of frames for the entire assembly process. Assembly workers put various components along with any barcodes into the tray and pass it down the assembly line to various assembly stations. 

Assembly staff preparing a tray after printing barcodes
Assembly staff preparing a tray after printing barcodes
Assembly tray that travels with each pair
Assembly tray that travels with each pair

On an assembly line, there are typically various stations where either a set of steps or a single step are performed. These steps are often broken up in such a way that makes the overall process faster and more efficient than having them be performed at a single station.

Classic frames waiting at an assembly station
Classic frames waiting at an assembly station
Various legs at a staging area
Various legs at a staging area

The bulk of our work recently has been performed in conjunction with our factory to smooth out all of the production processes. While designing a product, it is impossible to have a complete grasp on the most efficient way to perform assembly. Often times, what seems like a good idea initially can be problematic for a factory, and often times their facilities may have better or alternative methods for any given assembly step.

These practice production runs help to align our plans with what is most efficient at the factory. One of the most enjoyable parts is working with the staff and collaborating to come up with creative solutions when things aren't as efficient or easy to perform as they should be. 

Talking through a particular assembly step with the factory staff
Talking through a particular assembly step with the factory staff
Yibin (left) watching as the assembly staff work on leg assembly
Yibin (left) watching as the assembly staff work on leg assembly

As the product moves farther down the production line, everything starts to come together. One of the most rewarding parts about production is seeing all the design details working as expected and in such a way that let's our factory easily assemble the final product. 

Front frame assembly
Front frame assembly
A Classic pair near the final stages of assembly
A Classic pair near the final stages of assembly

After the product is fully assembled, and a variety of functional, electrical, and quality inspections are performed, the product finally reaches the packaging area. Here, the glasses are packaged up along with their accessories and instruction booklets, affixed with a packaging label, and then prepared for handoff to our courier for shipment!

Packaging area of the assembly line
Packaging area of the assembly line

Up next, we'll be performing more practice runs like this until the units coming off the line meet our quality standards. After that—shipping! We'll cover a bit more below. 

App & Packaging

We've haven't shared a lot of details regarding the packaging or the app, and we know folks are eager to see. We've been working on a brand refresh that we'll be pushing live as we begin shipping, and our backers will be the first to see and experience it. The first place you'll notice this is in the app and in the packaging. Things like fonts, colors, and icons have been meticulously updated, and together they form a new visual identity for Vue. 

As far as a status update goes, the packaging is done, the manuals are printed, and they're waiting for finished units. The apps are in their final stages of fixing bugs, and they'll be published to their respective app stores soon. 

Timelines

We haven't finished the first 1000 units, but we'll get there soon. We know that it feels like Zeno's Dichotomy Paradox, where we seem to get infinitely close but never quite there, and we apologize for that. At this stage, we're working with our factory on process improvements to the assembly line so that we can ensure that every product coming off the line meets our quality standards. We appreciate all our backers being supportive and hanging in there, and we empathize with backers that are frustrated that their rewards are taking so long to get to them. 

We get a lot of questions about why we can't set an exact date, and why we always mention shipping "sometime" within a given period. The honest answer is because the remaining work is dynamic. For example, we've finished a practice assembly run and identified areas that need improvement. Now we're revising our assembly instructions with the goal of re-training staff next week. We'll then perform another practice run, assess the quality and improvements, and repeat the process. In a perfect world, everything will go smoothly on the next run, and we'll realize we're ready to go to full production. But manufacturing is never this simple, especially on the first run, so we anticipate a few iterations. 

That being said, we have a great factory who is highly collaborative and constructive, and who is working closely with us to keep as tight a schedule as possible. We're aiming to run practice runs nearly every week until we reach our quality targets, then it's full steam ahead. We’re targeting to begin shipping the first 1000 units in October. As mentioned previously, this does not mean we'll only ship 1000 per month—we will ramp our manufacturing volume considerably thereafter. 

Reward Updates 

While production continues, we remind everyone to contact support@enjoyvue.com with any updates to your rewards, including to your address or prescription. Our lens partner has already begun making lenses, so not everyone will be able to update prescriptions anymore. If you believe there is any chance you are changing your prescription soon, you need to plan ahead and contact us. We can’t guarantee changes can be made while production ramps up.

Support 

Reach us at support@enjoyvue.com with any questions, and remember the following before emailing: 

  • Please email us instead of messaging us on Kickstarter. Kickstarter's messaging system is not well-suited for support, and we check it less frequently than support@enjoyvue.com
  • We are no longer accepting changes to frame styles, frame colors, or lens types. 
  • We are still accepting last minute prescription changes at support@enjoyvue.com.
  • If you are emailing us to ask about your pledge, you must send the email using the email that you originally used to make the pledge. For example, we cannot assist you if you originally used “____@gmail.com” but now you email us from “____@yahoo.com”. 

We receive hundreds more emails than normal immediately after posting updates, so we apologize if it takes longer than expected for us to get back to you! 

Until next time! 

With love, 

the Vue team