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Finally see distant galaxies, and in partnership with SETI Institute, leverage its ease of use to contribute to science.
Finally see distant galaxies, and in partnership with SETI Institute, leverage its ease of use to contribute to science.
Finally see distant galaxies, and in partnership with SETI Institute, leverage its ease of use to contribute to science.
2,144 backers pledged $2,209,270 to help bring this project to life.

1,500th telescope. Thank you!

Posted by Franck Marchis
110 likes

Dear Backers,  

We have just passed the pledge of our 1,500th telescope. With such an amazing number of eVscopes soon to be in operation around the planet, our Campaign Mode and Citizen Science applications will be extraordinary exciting and revolutionary! Your support has brought us to this truly amazing moment, and all we can say is thank you.

After so many questions about planets and requests for additional photos, we felt the need to conduct new observations—and despite bad weather in parts of the Northern Hemisphere, we managed to do it! As you check out these pictures, please keep in mind that what you see through the eVscope’s eyepiece is far more beautiful and mind blowing. The image quality and observing experience there are definitely superior to what you see in these photos.

The eVscope provides truly amazing astronomical views when pointed at nebulae and galaxies. As you can imagine, the Unistellar team has seen lots of targets over the past three months, but we were delighted to see new ones with our eVscope because they are so beautiful and awe-inspiring. 

Spiral Galaxy NGC891, for example, is an unforgettable sight in the eyepiece of an eVscope. It’s similar to our Milky Way, but because we see it edge-on, the structures made by the dust and gas are particularly striking.

Picture of the galaxy NGC891 taken with the eVscope from Pourrieres, France. (magnification x100)
Picture of the galaxy NGC891 taken with the eVscope from Pourrieres, France. (magnification x100)

Of course, we also observed one of the most iconic objects in the night sky, the Orion Nebula (M42). This object is a stellar nursery and contains a very young open cluster known as the Trapezium. Its coloration is caused by the excitation of gas that surrounds these young stars.

Picture of the Orion Nebula observed with the eVscope from Pourrière, South of France (magnification x 50).
Picture of the Orion Nebula observed with the eVscope from Pourrière, South of France (magnification x 50).

Many of you asked about planets. Keep in mind that they are smaller and brighter than deep-sky objects. We designed the eVscope to view deep-sky objects that are faint and extended, and that’s why our device is not optimal for viewing planets. But as you can see in the following picture, Saturn and its rings are clearly visible in an eVscope, despite their current low elevation in the sky.

Saturn observed with a numerical zoom x150. This image was taken at 20 degree elevation so under poor atmospheric conditions (magnification x150).
Saturn observed with a numerical zoom x150. This image was taken at 20 degree elevation so under poor atmospheric conditions (magnification x150).

We will continue to post pictures of targets on our blog and in our newsletter and our social media. Join us there!  

Clear Skies,

The Unistellar Team 

Jim Bundy, Kevin, and 108 more people like this update.

Comments

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    1. UNISTELLAR Creator on November 23, 2017

      @Robert Powel I talked too fast, our optics specialist got it and says it would be useful on eVscope so we'll probably make such an accessory!

    2. UNISTELLAR Creator on November 23, 2017

      @Robert Powel are you talking about a filters?

    3. UNISTELLAR Creator on November 23, 2017

      @ Gibert Mathieu For NGC891 image : 3 minutes
      Orion Nebula image : 2 minutes
      But they are both already visible after few seconds, especially Orion Nebula
      Thanks for your kind support!

    4. Missing avatar

      Rob Keenan on November 20, 2017

      Hi guys. Congratulations. Very happy to be a backer. Are you going to try to image Oumuamua before it disappears for good? Rob

    5. Gibert Mathieu on November 20, 2017

      Hi
      Just a quick question:
      How long (in time) did you integrate to get these wonderful images of NGC891 and Orion Nebula?
      Many thanks in advance!
      Good luck for the crazy year ahead!!

    6. Missing avatar

      Robert Powell on November 19, 2017

      I'd like to see if an aperture mask would tease out a little more planet detail. Maybe a mask with a 1" aperture might. Try something like that at one of your outings. It might make a nice (and profitable) accessory!

    7. UNISTELLAR Creator on November 19, 2017

      Hi Paul Lecoq,

      Your question got answered, please go back to the former update. The answer is: of course our date of delivery will be respected, our suppliers and subcontractors confirmed that to us when we asked them after we saw our incredible success.

    8. Missing avatar

      Paul.lecoq@cern.ch on November 19, 2017

      Hello
      Congratulations for the success. I see that you communicate very well on this.
      It would be good if you could answer as well some legitimate questions from the people having supporting you. I never received an answer to the question I asked already quite some time ago:
      IN VIEW OF THE SUCCESS OF THE KICKSTARTER OPERATION, CAN YOU GUARANTEE THE DELIVERY DATE OF NOV 2018 AS PROMISED?
      Thank you for letting us know. A note in your next newsletter would be very welcome.

    9. Jan Kaiser
      Superbacker
      on November 19, 2017

      Since everything is done in software, couldn’t you add a “planet mode”, which would tweak the timing etc. to optimize for smaller lighter objects like planets? Seems like an obvious advantage of your approach.

      Thanks

    10. Missing avatar

      Jay Crocker on November 18, 2017

      Congrats on #1500! The trapezium pic is incredibly beautiful. I understand tha a short focal length scope is not optimal for solar system targets but that is still a nice image of saturn. Thanks for the update