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What is trust? Delve into the Rose language to develop more effective and healthy ways to trust.
What is trust? Delve into the Rose language to develop more effective and healthy ways to trust.
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Issue 21: Learning the Trades

How does trust to trade with others differ from trust in yourself?

Trade  T possible r memories a in the middle d a comfortable midpoint e now and in the future
Trade T possible r memories a in the middle d a comfortable midpoint e now and in the future

 The children of the Greenhouse also learned trades, both so they could put food on the table now and food in their bellies in the future. But of course, the lessons were not simply sewing and cooking and gardening. Keys (people who had registered accounts and could access the internet) could learn anything by asking the net. Illegals, who could not access Ports or find every bit of knowledge humans had garnered over the centuries, needed to learn anything and everything they could.

So Petal made the trade lessons work double-time. Sister Mary Magdalene had gotten old paper texts of **geometry and engineering, and everyone learned to calculate circles and sine angles and sums to draw dress patterns and suit patterns. The Greenhouse boasted four sewing machines, two adapted with solar panels and two foot powered. These were going from before breakfast to late into the night. Cooking involved chemistry, Petal explained again and again. Their tests were practical—what does heat do to the molecular structure of the eggs, and why. What happens to beans when they are put in water to soak? What is the chemical reaction that creates fire? 

Gardening brought out the concepts of biology, of photosynthesis and symbiosis. For marigolds protect an herb border from insects. 

 But most of all, Petal taught them negotiating tools. How might we create trades and work together? What is it that you have that I need? What do I have that you need? How do we determine a fair value? 

“For,” Petal said, “plants created their symbiosis over long eons of time, each generation of plants offering a tiny bit more, and those who had just that tiny edge survived to create the next generation of plants, which honed that edge just that much further. But humans don’t have that kind of time. You need to learn now and adapt now in your lifetime. and thus we have language. And thus we can negotiate and trade.” 

The usual tactics: offer the goods at a higher price than you will accept. Do not accept the lowest bids or the first offer—find a comfortable middle ground. Build the trust and credibility for the next trade, as each trade cements a relationship. But then Petal also taught the unusual tactics, the Rose tactics. In your mind, she said, draw an “n” in Rose. Do not think “n: dishonest or n: honest.”Just draw it. 

 

n honest
n honest

N honest 

Now see the n you drew in your mind—or on paper if you are sure the seller does not know Rose. Is there a tail on the end, showing a slanted truth, a crafty answer? Then something may be wrong here, and you may not want to trust the deal. Is the tail straight and strong under the end? Then you may extend your trust. Stem asked why this would work at all, her eyes wrinkling in confusion.

 “Because you need to be able to trust yourself,” Petal replied. “Teach your gut to speak in Rose, and you will always be able to see what your gut instincts are telling you. Then, just trust your gut. Trust yourself.” 

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