Share this project

Done

Share this project

Done
Scavenge. Build. Fight. Survive. Introducing ROAM, an online co-op action game set in a procedurally generated world.
Scavenge. Build. Fight. Survive. Introducing ROAM, an online co-op action game set in a procedurally generated world.
Created by
3,526 backers pledged $102,518 to help bring this project to life.

New member | "Behind the scenes" | Interviews | Music contest

Posted by ROAM (Creator)

Greetings, fellow zombie apocalypse survivors! As stated in the previous update and in threads on the official forum, ROAM has been undergoing much internal restructuring. Additionally, complications have arisen that are some months in the making. Initially, we had thought these issues had been resolved, but we were mistaken. The original update planned cannot be released due to legal reasons (we cannot elaborate on this at the moment), but it has not slowed down game development.

We welcome a brilliant new programmer to our team, Phillip Moon! We also have a brief behind-the-scenes look at how we are creating the structures in ROAM, as well as a few interviews. Also... wait for it... a music contest!

ROAM welcomes a new addition to our team: Phillip Moon!

Phil has always had a passion for movies and videogames. Originally, he went to film school in New York at the New York Film Academy. However, after a year, he decided to attend the University of Wisconsin Madison and obtained a Bachelor in Computer Science. Outside of school, he landed a database job at Epic. When offered the chance to work on ROAM, Phil jumped at the opportunity. (Fun fact: Ryan and Phil have known each other since kindergarten!)

We have developed a system using a 3D asset creation technique that is commonly used throughout many games. In order to streamline the creation of buildings in ROAM, we have broken this down into the smallest unit of construction: building segments.

These can be placed in conjunction with one another and attached to create rooms.

By combining these rooms, we are creating a floor plan.

This floor plan is then populated with objects to create the interior environment.

By using these segments like pieces to a puzzle and utilizing this technique, we are hoping to create very detailed environments with very low performance cost.

Interview with WorldsFactory.net

After seeing our Kickstarter, we were very fortunate enough to be interviewed by Alessio Palumbo of the Italian web publication, Worlds Factory! You can check out the in-depth interview at http://www.worldsfactory.net/2013/06/05/roam-interview-exclusive

Worlds Factory is a brand new website that publishes daily news and articles on everything related to home entertainment: videogames, movies, TV series, and books – all thanks to their dedicated staff. Additionally, they have published many game developer interviews (such as ROAM), and they will even be at Gamescom reporting live! The web publication’s ideology is holistic in nature as they believe all home entertainment share the common denominator of transporting people into incredible fictional worlds. It is the goal of Worlds Factory to guide their readers toward a better understanding of these media.

Interview with JumpToGamer.com

We were interviewed by Stephen Jackson of JumpToGamer recently for their Indie Spotlight blog! Take a look at the awesome interview at http://www.jumptogamer.com/indie-spotlight/roam-q-and-a/

JumpToGamer was founded in late May 2013, with the focus on giving Indie games that are currently in development (such as ROAM, whoa!) some exposure and recognition – as highlighted in their “Indie Spotlight” section. This addresses the existing gap in the market with regard to getting in touch with games early on in development and seeing them blossom. Not only do they provide studios and games a chance for exposure, they also reflect this ideology in their wonderful team of writers – all of whom are new to Game Journalism and have been given the chance they so desired. With their steadfast dedication and determination, they are sure to become a recognized and popular site, providing interviews, news, reviews, and previews from a gamer’s point of view!

Interview with GameStar.ru

Another great interview we had was with the charismatic Kirill Ulezko of the Russian game reporting website, GameStar. Being interviewed by someone who is as avid as we are about zombies was definitely a great experience! You can find the interview in English at http://gamestar.ru/english/roam_interview_eng.html, as well as in Russian http://gamestar.ru/article/roam_interview.html

GameStar.ru and their international team of writers present intriguing reviews, previews, reports, and interviews regarding videogames in Russian. Almost all interviews with well-known and unknown developers are published in English as well.

Have your music featured in ROAM!

Due to the nature of Kickstarter and the way fans directly contributed to ROAM’s development, we are opening an opportunity to have music created by YOU in a game funded by YOU!

Sounds like it’s time for a contest – submit your ROAM-themed music to us!

You are in the midst of a post-apocalyptic environment where the world is overrun by zombies. Your survival instincts, scavenging prowess, and your ability to fortify and defend your position are keeping you alive each dawn to dusk. Imperative decisions must be made between when to sneak away and when to stand and fight. As you move through environments, ambient music runs in the background – underscoring the grave nature of the world now.

The best submissions will be the ones that capture the very essence of ROAM, without being overbearing or distracting from the experience.

Send submissions to roamthegame@gmail.com. One submission per e-mail. Please title the subject of the e-mail in the following format so that it does not get overlooked and lost in our database:

ROAM Music Contest Application: <insert your name here>

The length of each ambient background music submission must be a minimum of 5 minutes long, with no restrictions on a maximum length.

File formats may be in .wav (Waveform Audio), .mp3 (MPEG-1 Audio Layer 3), and .wma (Windows Media Audio).

Submission deadline: End of August (i.e. before Sunday, September 1, 2013, 12:00am EST). Entries submitted after this date will not be considered.

Prizes:

ALL first, second and third place winners will have their music featured in ROAM and will be credited. You will also have the chance to create more music with the game. If this is the case, you will be monetarily compensated.

First place:
Pledge reward of Search Party – Four early access beta keys. Each of the four keys include a Kickstarter survival kit, a Backer backpack, and a digital copy of the soundtrack.

Second and third place:
Pledge reward of Not So Lone Survivor – Two early access beta keys. Each of the two keys include a Kickstarter survival kit, a Backer backpack, and a digital copy of the soundtrack.

DISCLAIMER:

You must legally own each and every part of the musical piece. No music clips or remixes, everything must be owned and created by you. By entering into this contest, you agree to these terms.

Good luck, everyone! We look forward to listening to your awesome zombie-themed ambient music submissions!

Comments

Only backers can post comments. Log In
    1. gadam07 on

      Thanks for the update! It's good to hear things are moving along, especially with a new programmer. If you're being harassed legally, you know the Electronic Frontier Foundation is there for you. Don't put up with that stuff.

    2. ThomasN on

      Julien Heijmans: I can see why Collis Ta'eed does not like contests. If the issuer abuses it without fairly upfront payment statement, it's definately not fair, because artists ARE "dime a dozen". Just being in a damn thing should not be considered payment, at that point it's slavery. I don't even know if it would be legal here in Germany if you put out a project, let multiple people work on it, and take the best result. I strongly think it would be black labor. To decide what person to hire for a job, is what biddings and proposals are for (before actually starting the work). Truth is non-artist-workers also have to work for proposals and I guess the right action to enter a contest as an artist would be to send in your already existing demo works. Because that's enough so they know if they want to hire you.

    3. Attrayoo Driscoll-Plavins on

      @Julien.

      Regarding the money issue, the update says that

      "You will also have the chance to create more music with the game. If this is the case, you will be monetarily compensated."

      But money isn't only thing here: I am studying composition at Uni and want to get into the video game industry, which from my unterstanding is a very specific and exclusive club. Contests like these are the only thing that I can think of to get started in the right direction. Getting a piece in a video game and on the soundtrack is an amazing feat and looks great on a resume, and I (and many other composers I imagine) are jumping at the opportunity.

    4. Silver on

      Thanks for the update. :)

      The contest is OK by me, there shouldn't be any problems with it considering the fact that the campaign is already funded (Kickstarter has rules against contests during funding).

      For added transparency, as soon as you CAN talk about those issues you mentioned in the opening paragraph, please do so.

    5. Veav on

      So, what you're (not) saying is that there was a falling-out in the team, and someone took their marbles and left. What are we looking at for a timeline now? Are you confident that you can still deliver the product?

      @Music It's fine, plenty of musicians will jump at this chance. Just about everyone on soundcloud is spamming each other with "check out my mix". :P

    6. Are Nybakk on

      In fact, Kickstarter is all about competition. Don't you think there are many resources wasted on bad Kickstarter campaigns? Sure, but most of them didn't really have the right to live. It's harsh, but fair.

    7. Are Nybakk on

      @Julien Heijmans: People and companies waste resources on missed opportunities all the time. They must compete to get the job, and in many ways that's a good thing. Bad for those that failed, but good for the consumer. Also, it encourages making good products, and if the selection process is right, the best product wins. The trick is to weigh the risk. For a lone artist it might seem harsh.

    8. Julien Heijmans on

      I really dislike the music contest thing !
      You guys started a kickstarter to get paid for the work you are making, but are asking others to work for free ? (Or no, they can hope to maybe win a cdkey of a game they already backed)

      Contests like that (In the music field and in any other field) are just plein bad for everyone. How many people will work for nothing ? How many manhours wasted.

      Some things to read:
      http://www.portlandmercury.com/imager/why-design-contests-are-bad-for-artists/b/original/10059225/9d60/profile-570.jpg

      http://freelanceswitch.com/designer/design-contests-devaluing-design-and-is-it-ever-ok/

      Anyway, except from that, keep up the good work !

    9. Attrayoo Driscoll-Plavins on

      I am definitely submitting an audio track. The hard part with this will be finding the right mix between interesting content without it being to distracting.

    10. Jordan York on

      I'm glad to hear that game development has not slowed down. Good luck with the legalities.

    11. Are Nybakk on

      The tech info was rather elementary, but thanks for the update anyway. I hope we get to see some in-game footage soon! With another programmer on board, that will hopefully happen.

      Having a working prototype/poc ready when the campaign started is a big plus, which reduce the chance of project failure. That's one of the reasons I backed this project. The challenge, I think, is to make it in good time and polish it enough without becoming a victim to feature creep.

      Please keep us updated as much as you can :)

    12. ThomasN on

      Jebus, the legalites! Being influenced by earlier works during making music is THEFT! Please blank your mind during creative works and pull every idea of of a fucking vaccum. Because that's possible in legalite-world.

    13. Zyggy on

      Agreed, that does sound ominous.

    14. Shane Zehnder on

      I agree with Chris. Please elaborate. I am SOO tired of getting burned on Kickstarter games, I'm a bit gun-shy now.

    15. Jalister on

      Welcome Phillip Moon.

      Thanks for the update. This is still in my top 5 kickstarters list.

    16. Chris Bla Keks on

      Good to hear you get some help!
      Could you please elaborate what the following means in detail?
      "The original update planned cannot be released due to legal reasons [...]"
      Thank you in advance!