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Putting your ports in perfect order and protecting them from human error. Explore your Raspberry Pi's GPIO ports safely and easily.
Putting your ports in perfect order and protecting them from human error. Explore your Raspberry Pi's GPIO ports safely and easily.
1,095 backers pledged £23,561 to help bring this project to life.
David Penney, Markus Laire, and 17 more people like this update.

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    1. Alex Eames - RasPi.TV 8-time creator on

      @Craig Thanks for mentioning that. Yes that is correct if you're using 14/15 as UART. But if you're using 14/15 as GPIO (rather than alt function Tx/Rx) that issue becomes irrelevant. So it really only affects advanced users who will solder on a header and connect via the direct Tx/Rx connections.

    2. Craig Dunn
      Superbacker
      on

      I believe it was just discovered that there are changes to the GPIO pins on the Pi3. From the FAQ:

      "My GPIO-connected UART device is broken on Pi 3, why?
      The mini-uart is now routed to GPIO14/15 as the PL011 UART is now used for bluetooth communications. The mini-uart doesn't have a separate clock divisor and uses the core clock frequency. Changes in core clock (e.g. through throttling or idle/load frequency changes) will result in arbitrary modification of the effective baud rate. "

      You can see some workarounds, but even these GPIO reassignments will cause other issues and/or loss of functionality. See this blog for full details on the issue and workarounds: http://www.briandorey.com/post/Raspberry-Pi-3-UART-Overlay-Workaround

    3. Alex Eames - RasPi.TV 8-time creator on

      Hi Sami it's really simple and I have published the basics in the FAQ...
      How does the port protection work?
      It uses a 330R resistor in series with each port to limit current to 10 mA per port. A 3V3 Zener diode 'clips' any over-voltage and diverts the excess to GND. It also protects against small negative voltage (~-1V)
      ...but I doubt it would help you very much at 5000V. It's designed to protect against someone accidentally wiring 5V (or maybe 12V) up to a GPIO pin. It's not for seriously High voltage protection. Yes I do plan a blog about this at some point, but it won't be very soon.

    4. Sami on

      Hi Alex,

      Can you please soon explain/describe how the hat can protect Raspberries. You once claimed that the hat saved your RB2b and said you would explain that later thoroughly. However, I have not seen any convincing explanation.

      It would be very nice to get some designs about the isolation. How many layers and where isolations etc? I would like to understand how the hat could improve the isolation of the raspberry. I am interested in the fact because I am using my own hats where I have protected the raspberry from exterior by ADUMs1000 which lasts one minute at 5000 V. It would be nice to understand how the hat could interfere my designs. I would like to see how the hat can better isolate the raspberry from the transformer.

      Best regards,

      Sami