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Remember the old Gauntlet Legends on N64 and Dreamcast? It was a great game, and was the base of our inspiration for Heroes of Forevia. Read more

Portland, OR Video Games
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pledged of $10,000 goal
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Funding Unsuccessful

This project's funding goal was not reached on April 7, 2012.

Remember the old Gauntlet Legends on N64 and Dreamcast? It was a great game, and was the base of our inspiration for Heroes of Forevia.

Why We're Here, The Void, And Thoughts From Anthony

Hello again everyone!

It's been a wacky week, and it's time to update you all now that we're just a week away from our funding deadline.

First I want to touch on why there is an utter lack of in-game screenshots. The bottom line is that we discussed it again just before we were going to post some, and decided that posting anything that wouldn't end up representing our finished product would be premature, and would cause more confusion than clarity. We are working toward it, but giving out and ETA (as I've tried before) just isn't a bright idea.

Now, let me start by stating why I (Anthony) am here.

Like many of you I grew up playing and loving video games. From Atari to Phantasy Star all the way through Goldeneye and Borderlands. I like all sorts of games. My love of gaming lead me to my goal of being a game developer. I set out at a young age to learn what it took. My journey started out with numerous books on C and C++. Which then lead to OpenGL and on to using various game engines such as Genesis3D, CrystalSpace and then Ogre (among the free ones).

Sooner or later, Pat and myself began developing a simply multiplayer shooter that ultimately didn't get out of our idea phase. I did get some basic multiplayer modes developed, such as king of the hill, deathmatch and even a capture the flag mode. One of the things we wanted was an online score tracking system (which really wasn't that common at the time). I had no real knowledge of web development, so I set out to learn what I needed to do so. That lead me to my eventual career path as a web developer. It would be years until I made the attempt to take on game development again.

Things have changed recently for myself. I have a 3 year old with kidney failure. He's on dialysis every night, which ultimately limits what I can do in terms of heading in to an office on a regular basis. It's a hurdle, similar to many we all face often, but with it has come an opportunity. I now have the needed free time to get back to why I ever became a programmer in the first place: To build a fun game with a great team.

But there's a new problem. Game development is getting more and more expensive. When I first saw Kickstarter I thought it would be the perfect opportunity for an indie game dev team like ours. I quickly found out otherwise. Kickstarter isn't exactly for the new guys. Even though we may have the skills to complete a wonderful product, being a true indie means we lack the name recognition needed to make you, our awesome pledgers, comfortable with the idea that we really can finish our game.

Gamers take games seriously, as they should. Now, it's up to us to get this project where it needs to go. We're finishing this game no matter the outcome of Kickstarter, our indie game development lives depend on it.

Can we still get funded?

Absolutely we can. If you believe in our idea, you can help it become a reality and be a part of it's development. We need all the help we can get. We've already got great help from all sorts of our pledgers, but we need more. We need help spreading the word, telling our story. This is about more than just a great, Gauntlet Legends inspired game. It's about the journey from where we are now, to actually shipping our first game. For me, it's a chance to prove to my little boy that if you want something enough, hard work and dedication is all you will ever need to get it.


    1. Creator Duncan Sample on April 2, 2012

      I think it would really help to see some sort of conceptual drawings of the kind of game you're hoping to create. I'm backing a few games at the moment, and each for between $50 and $110 but with this I find it a bit of a gamble, although sounding like an interesting game, so that's why I've not pledged as much as I would otherwise. You don't need to go as far as something like The Banner Saga have in showing rich content, but some simple sketches/character designs/game mechanics might help get more interested.

      I hope you make it, but at the moment I see it as a slim chance given the deadline and the current pledged amount.

    2. Creator Omnifarious on March 31, 2012

      I agree. I'm interested in this as a gf of mine and I really love to play co-op hack and slash games. But the marketing and rewards are just a bit off for generating the right level of interest. I hope you get funded, but if you don't and you get to do this again, I would try looking over what a few other video game projects offer at various reward levels and model your reward system after theirs.

      Going for the endearingly awkward humor of Double Fine is probably not what you should do. There is only one Tim Schafer. So go for your own style in your marketing message. :-)

    3. Creator Ryan on March 29, 2012

      Maybe we could get more rewards > 40 but less than 100? The average pledge is $70 on most Kickstarter but with this project we have to either go a reasonable 40 or an expensive 100.