Share this project

Done

Share this project

Done
Introducing the RoVa3D
 – the most rugged, versatile, & user-friendly desktop 3D 
printer.  Our printer is flexible, customizable & 
affordable, & it's the perfect solution for the extreme maker.
Introducing the RoVa3D – the most rugged, versatile, & user-friendly desktop 3D printer.  Our printer is flexible, customizable & affordable, & it's the perfect solution for the extreme maker.
91 backers pledged CA$ 132,120 to help bring this project to life.

How Big Can You Print With a RoVa3D Printer?

Posted by ORD Solutions (Creator)
1 like

Introduction

The published build area of a RoVa3D Printer is 11.18” x 11.88” x 7.55”.

This means that the printable area of the print bed is 11.18 inches (28.397cm) wide, or in the X dimension, 11.88 inches (30.17cm) deep, or in the Y dimension, and 7.55 inches (19.177cm) tall, or in the Z dimension.

But can you print an object that is 11.18” by 11.88” by 7.55”? The short answer is: Yes. For the long answer, read on.

In this update, we’re going to walk you through how these numbers are calculated, and what dimensions you can rely on for calculating the printable area of your printer.

The calculation of build area depends on three factors:

  • 1) How many nozzles are installed in the printer?  
  • 2) How many of the installed nozzles will be used during the print?  
  • 3) How many different materials will be used throughout the print?

Let’s look at each of these factors.

1) How many nozzles are installed in the printer?

Different numbers of nozzles affect the print area in a few ways. A single nozzle RoVa3D can move farther in the X dimension because there aren't additional hot ends taking up valuable space on the X carriage. Adding nozzles reduces the X carriage movement, but expands the area that can be reached, since we now have more nozzles. The table below shows the maximum printable area for 7 different nozzle configurations.

From the table above, you can see that not all nozzle configurations give you the maximum build area. You can also see that in certain configurations with fewer than 5 nozzles, you can actually get a taller object printed than the published values due to an increase in the Z dimension. The published values are for the most common configuration, which is 5 nozzles.

2) How many of the installed nozzles will be used during the print?

To achieve the build volumes described in (1) above, it is necessary to use all of the available nozzles. That is, you must do a multi-nozzle print, with the same material loaded into multiple nozzles. Different nozzles are used to reach the far corners of the print bed, but the final print will appear as if it was printed with a single nozzle, because it was all printed with the same material.

Detailed instructions on how to modify your models to accommodate multiple nozzles will be posted in the Solutions area of our Support site. The short version is that you use NetFabb Basic or a similar tool to slice your model into pieces, and export each piece as a standalone .stl file. Then you combine the standalone files into a single .amf file in Slic3r, and assign different nozzles to the different parts.

If you only use a single nozzle in a print, you are limited to the reach of that one nozzle. Here are the maximum build areas for a single nozzle in each of the 7 different nozzle configurations.

3) How many different materials will be used throughout the print?

If you are doing a multi-material print, then you can’t use the technique described in item (2) to expand your printable area. In (2), you can print to the area if at least one of your nozzles can reach it. In a multi-material print, you need ALL of your nozzles to reach a given area, which necessarily reduces the available print area. The chart below shows the maximum printable area for the same 7 different nozzle configurations, except that this time we assume that you have 5 nozzles installed on your RoVa3D printer, but you are only using the ones indicated.

Conclusion

We hope we haven’t confused you too badly with all of these charts and numbers. If after reviewing the above, you are still unsure if you can print a given object on our printer, feel free to contact us through Kickstarter, or even better, through our ticketing system in our Support Portal. Attach a copy of your model in STL or AMF file format, and we’ll take a look and let you know if you can print your object on a RoVa3D Printer.

Tim Hedstrom likes this update.

Comments

Only backers can post comments. Log In
    1. ORD Solutions 4-time creator on

      @Laura - Yes you are correct. Removing the one or more nozzles is not something you would want to do on a regular basis. It will take a couple of hours the first time to disassemble and then reassemble in the new configuration. But it is doable, absolutely. We can help you with this when the time comes to make sure it is something you can do.

      @Alexandre - I will ask Chris to do something up in Solidworks to show you.

      4 nozzles, 2 for 2 materials, is a question that relies on the geometry of the model. It will be no bigger than the 4 nozzle row in table 1, and no smaller than the 4 nozzle row in table 3.

      With 5 nozzles, it is the same answer as with 4 nozzles. Depends on the geometry of the model, within the limits described in the tables.

      @Marcel - You are very welcome :)

    2. Laura Ling on

      It took me a few times through to understand #2... To make sure I'm understanding, though, you can install up to 5 nozzle units, but do not have to. If you do install more than one, but only print with one, your build volume is lower because the unused nozzles limit movement. If you install more than 1 nozzle unit, you should print from all of them with the same material to get the largest build volume. Close? :)

      And can we install/remove the nozzles ourselves? I'm sure it's been mentioned somewhere, but I've already spent all afternoon looking at programs so I can get started making stuff as soon as it arrives! :-D

    3. Asmo on

      Hi,
      Thanks for the update. I would be interested by 3 things for future reference :
      - can you give a schematic referencing the nozzles positions ?
      - also, if you use 4 nozzles (2 for 2 materials), what is the build volume ?
      - still in this line, if you use 5 nozzles, with -say the support material- on the 5th, what is the print volume for the 5th one ? (3 materials, 2 nozzles for the 1st, 2 nozzles for the 2nd, 1 nozzle for the last).
      Regards,
      AM

    4. Missing avatar

      Marcel Valcarce on

      Thanks for getting that info together, helps to figure out what sizes I will be capable of.