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Announcing the GANGLION and the ULTRACORTEX—a $99 biodata acquisition device and a 3D-printed, brain-sensing headset.
Announcing the GANGLION and the ULTRACORTEX—a $99 biodata acquisition device and a 3D-printed, brain-sensing headset.
644 backers pledged $168,829 to help bring this project to life.

"Best of OpenBCI" — Top 10 Projects Done By Our Community!

Posted by Joel Murphy & Conor Russomanno (Creator)
6 likes

With tech products—especially neurotech gear—it's sometimes hard to see yourself applying the technology in real life. People often assume it's only scientists, researchers, or PhD's who fully understand the tech and can actually do anything cool with it. Well, my friends, OpenBCI is here to show you that this is not the case! We've collected stories of awesome people, from all sorts of backgrounds and experience levels, doing some amazing things with OpenBCI gear.

Among the many innovative, inspiring, and just plain cool applications of OpenBCI tech, we definitely have some favorites. Here's a list of ten OpenBCI projects that are most near and dear to our hearts:

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1) Brain-Controlled Shark Attack!

This hack/tutorial was done by Chip Audette, who runs the super awesome blog, EEG Hacker. In this hack, 5 people merge minds to control an RC floating shark using alpha brain waves! The project is based on his earlier (and equally as awesome) hack, "Brain-Controlled Hex Robot!" Both projects received lots of press (WIRED & IEEE Spectrum). 

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2) Droneuro —an EEG Audio Neurofeedback Experience

Droneuro is an audio neurofeedback experiment done by Guillaume Dumas. Guillaume used OpenBCI and some elegant software to turn his brain waves into this amazing soundscape!

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3) Brain-Controlled Labyrinth Game

Completed at the Brainihack hackathon in Tel Aviv last March, this awesome hack was featured in Hackaday! The creators—Daniel Harari, Gal, and Maxim—made a 3D-printed labyrinth that was controlled by brain activity. In order to win the game, you have to focus on flashing lights that affect your brain waves, and move a ball through the labyrinth. This technique is known as Steady State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP). Great work guys!

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4) SSVEEPers

A 2-player PvP visual neuromodulation game based on SSVEP techniques. Two players compete to rack up points based on how well they are able to focus different visual stimuli. Created by Octavian Drulea, John Naulty, and Yannick Roy, this hack won the OpenBCI Prize at the Neurogaming Conference Hackathon last May.

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5) TransAtlantic Biodata

This awesome hack was a collaboration between two hackathons happening on opposite sides of the Atlantic Ocean! Last June, members of the Waag Society in Amsterdam and BCI Montréal (now NeuroTechMTL) combined the OpenBCI technology with the Human-Human-Interface from our friends at Backyard Brains. Then participants at both hackathons were controlling each others muscles over the internet, using EMG signals and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) devices.

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6) Do Binaural Beats Really Affect Brain Waves?

"Can you use audio recordings to entrain your brainwaves, alter your consciousness, and meditate deeper than a zen monk”? This writeup sheds light on that question with a fairly simple open-source EEG experiment." Done by The Autodidacts of Vancouver Island.

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7) OpenBCI Crossing Swords With Motor Imagery

Done by the brilliant Jeremy Frey, this fantastic project teaches you how to use OpenBCI + OpenViBE to record signals from the motor cortex, or the region of the brain responsible for muscle movement! It serves as a great starting point for others who want to build motor-cortex based software and applications. In the project, Jeremy classifies motor signals to add 1 dimension of input to a game character who must jump over gaps in the floor to survive!

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8) EyeWink

"Control Your Smartphone By Winking ;-)" This epic hack was the winner of Hack The Brain UK, hosted at Makerversity in London last March. The app allows the user to map each eye wink (right or left) to a specific action to control a smartphone. This project was done by Davide Valeriani and Ana Matran-Fernandez and was later featured at the London Science Museum.

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9) Ultracortex Mark III (Modified)

After announcing the Ultracortex Mark III, Mickaël Fourgeaud took it upon himself to modify the pieces so he was able to print the Ultracortex in his own 3D printer, that had a smaller build volume than the printers we work with in the shop. More importantly, however, he went out of his way to share his modified design with the world! Thank you, Mickaël! Great work.

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10) WakeCap

This amazing project was just awarded $100,000 in funding by a program called Stars of ScienceHassan Albalawi, is in the process of designing a drowsiness detection headset for his thesis. Congratulations on getting the funding and we look forward to continuing to work with you on the WakeCap, Hassan.

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It was extremely tough to narrow it down to just ten because there are already so many great OpenBCI-based projects in the wild. If you're interested in discovering more projects done by the OpenBCI community, check out our community page and our forum! Also, you do not need any OpenBCI technology to contribute to the community page or forum. If you are interested in sharing information about events, your research, or even if you just have questions, head over to our community page and forum to join the conversation. 

2 days left! Thank you so much for the support so far. Let's finish strong. Please help us by spreading the word about the campaign via email and your favorite social media channels.

All the best,

The OpenBCI Team

P.S. A special thanks to maddogjetz for bringing this topic up on our Kickstarter comments page and inspiring this update! We'd love to hear your thoughts on the best OpenBCI projects, including ones we haven't heard about and even project ideas that haven't yet come to life.

The Autodidacts, David Andrews, and 4 more people like this update.

Comments

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    1. Tasha Turner
      Superbacker
      on

      Amazing stuff happening. Blows my mind thinking about how much more can be done with the improved model.