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A dark but playful point and click adventure, hand-animated in glorious frame-by-frame 2D. Free DEMO.
A dark but playful point and click adventure, hand-animated in glorious frame-by-frame 2D. Free DEMO.
A dark but playful point and click adventure, hand-animated in glorious frame-by-frame 2D. Free DEMO.
1,225 backers pledged $39,156 to help bring this project to life.

Over 80%, interviews galore

20 likes

Let me first say I'm truly touched by the positive feedback for the secret story reveal from 2 days ago. I also commend those who choose not to hear this reveal for a pure, unspoiled experience when the game is out. That's what probably I would do, but giving people the choice whether they want to be informed or not seems to have been the right thing to do.

On its final stretch, the campaign is picking up speed - currently at 82%, with over 830 wonderful backers - these numbers don't seem bad at all. Thank you once more, it's you who are making this happen!

Just recently, not one but two interviews popped up online featuring my humble self talking about TSIOQUE

The first is quite a lenghty one I did with Tom Bennett. Kind of hard for me to choose a quote with so much stuff people may (hopefully) find informative, but let's try this:

Alek Wasilewski Interview (Tsioque)

Day of the Tentacle, Heart of Darkness and King's Quest are listed as some of the key game design influences behind Tsioque - what is it about those classic adventure games that influenced you as both a player and a designer?

The influences of those games were mostly unconscious for me as I grew up playing them! I’ll never forget the thrill of watching the awesome animations that I'd get in reward for solving complex puzzles in Day of the Tentacle, the glistening disc of my first ever CD-ROM game King’s Quest V… I never got very far in the latter but it wasn’t important. It was magic. It wasn’t so much about recreating that same magic feeling, but more about using what I learnt from playing these games to tell my own story, and to be able to evoke in other people the similar emotions I felt when playing these classic adventure games as a kid.

From a game design perspective, what felt important to achieve was that extra care in animation rewarding you for your progress, smooth, well-paced gameplay, and the possibility of death. There was a reason why point and clicks stopped including fail states in games, and it was the same reason why I never got very far in King’s Quest V. It was frustrating having to restart all the way to your last save point just for just trying something, where trying anything to work with anything is (unfortunately) pretty much the epitome of the whole genre.

Still, years passed, the games started to be thoroughly tested, both the players and developers learned a lot. I thought it was possible to re-introduce the death/failure mechanism in a way that doesn’t punish you that much and allows for more immersion – you’re a prisoner in a monster-infested castle; if you’re careless something can happen to you! In fact, a good failure animation can be rewarding as well – I dream of making Tsioque complex enough to have people try to do wrong things on purpose just to see the mess it causes. This requires a certain stretch goal to be achieved, however, and for the moment chances of reaching that goal seem distant. Having said all that, all of the above would of course mean nothing without a proper story.

Read the whole interview here

Then there's the interview I did with Jesse Tannous for Examiner.com:

Tsioque is much more than a game for creator Alek Wasilewski

Jesse Tannous: Your career has mostly been spent making animated films, why was now the time you chose to try and develop a video game?

Alek Wasilewski: It was the time who chose me and not the other way around. It was a matter of chance. While I did dedicate most of my professional life to animation, I always saw myself more a storyteller in general rather than animator, or even filmmaker. Ever since I was a small kid, I’ve been coming up with all kinds of stories and trying to express them through writing, comics, photography…games, too!

Animation stuck with me eventually because the first animated short I did in 2003 (“Aura”) was received very enthusiastically, and I began to think this amazing medium - able to form such an immediate strong relationship with the viewer - might actually be accessible to me as a creator. Still, having spent a good deal of my childhood playing games, the idea of making a game myself has always stuck with me somewhere…but as time passed and life decisions were made, the prospect of making my own game was becoming more and more distant…until it appeared right in front of me.

Read the rest here

There seems to be some kind of storm coming... or maybe just my sinuses hurt, I don't know. We'll find out soon.

- Alek

Kickstarter love is all you need:

CivCraft - Legends of Ellaria, a Sandbox RPG,FPS,RTS game

An ambitious effort, CivCraft is designed to be both a First Person and a Real Time Strategy game - and you can switch between these modes whenever you wish. You can rule your kingdom in a huge and open world, or just go on adventures with the character you created if you need a break from leading armies to battle and managing a working economy.

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Comments

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    1. ET3D on August 30, 2015

      The demo convinced me well enough that fail states are well implemented. I enjoyed it even though Tsioque failed again and again. Granted, I don't want the entire game to force me to play timed sections, but it worked well enough for me.

    2. OhNoo Studio Creator on August 29, 2015

      @Porcupine - That's what I've been trying to put across here. As written in the interview, I never finished any of the King's Quest games for the very same reason. Still, it wasn't the fault of the fail states themselves but how unjustly punishing - and therefore bad for gameplay - they were. We chose to introduce it in much more modern and forgiving manner, with the intention for it to be an enrichment for the game, not a source of frustration.

      @TrentJaspar - well that's kind of a defeatist thing to say. Tsioque is a WARRIOR princess, she doesn't give up that easily.

    3. TrentJaspar on August 28, 2015

      I think we're (you're) going to make it. Maybe not the way we (you) would have preferred, but Tsioque will get her voice. We'll make sure of it!

    4. Porcupine on August 28, 2015

      To each his own I guess, but all I can say is that even though I'm an avid adventure gamer, the Space Quest series - which has death at every (mis)step as a central tenet of the whole experience - has been the absolute most painful experience of my game-playing 'career' that I never, ever, ever, ever intend to replay for that exact specific reason. If I wanted to keep dying, I'd play Counterstrike or somesuch. Adventure games are not supposed to be a chess match to be lost if you fail, but a jewel box waiting to be to be unlocked when you realize how they open.