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Women have been leaders in computing from the start, but not enough of our contributions are remembered. Keep our history.
Women have been leaders in computing from the start, but not enough of our contributions are remembered. Keep our history.
392 backers pledged $15,010 to help bring this project to life.

More Pictures of Educators Using the Decks You Sent Them

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Back by popular demand, more photos of educators using the decks you generously sent them. Remember: every one of you who bought a deck or a poster helped get decks to nearly 100 educators because profits rolled over. Your generosity is why these students are going to know about Ellen Ochoa, about Sophie Vandebroek, about Radia Perlman. Keep that in mind when you look through these pictures.

Here they are, followed by a quote from the educator who took them. All images are by permission:

"My students loved the cards and were very impressed with the accomplishments of the women on them.  They were especially happy that pictures of the women included."
"My students loved the cards and were very impressed with the accomplishments of the women on them. They were especially happy that pictures of the women included."
"The poster you can see it is on my Computer Science wall and it is pretty small compared to my others." (Jessica says: but we're in good company)
"The poster you can see it is on my Computer Science wall and it is pretty small compared to my others." (Jessica says: but we're in good company)
"One of the girls in my class was really excited about the cards and she is shown playing a Go Fish with another student in class…she wanted to use them today!"
"One of the girls in my class was really excited about the cards and she is shown playing a Go Fish with another student in class…she wanted to use them today!"

 The two previous images are from the same educator. She continued:

"I will be taking a picture next week as I shared four of the decks with a math teacher that is using them as her students create games with the CEMS students. I will be using them in my AP Computer Programming class when we get to sorting and I will also be using them in my Computer Science for Engineers class later on this month."

"Thank you so much for the cards!" (Jessica says: This photo is from Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
"Thank you so much for the cards!" (Jessica says: This photo is from Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
"I have received my cards and plan on using them to: 1) Play traditional cards. 2) Use the cards to randomly select students to read the cards out loud. 3) Use the cards for students to select their research topics."
"I have received my cards and plan on using them to: 1) Play traditional cards. 2) Use the cards to randomly select students to read the cards out loud. 3) Use the cards for students to select their research topics."
"Thank you so much for sending me the decks of cards. My students and I loved them very much." (More photos from someone we posted about last week)
"Thank you so much for sending me the decks of cards. My students and I loved them very much." (More photos from someone we posted about last week)
"We very much appreciate the cards and will make good use of them."
"We very much appreciate the cards and will make good use of them."

A couple of the educators weren't comfortable sharing images of students--which is totally valid--and so sent creative images of the cards in use:

Looks like a game of Solitaire--or FreeCell?
Looks like a game of Solitaire--or FreeCell?
A collage of the images in use: "My students have really enjoyed using them."
A collage of the images in use: "My students have really enjoyed using them."
"I can't wait to use them in a research project about women in computing."
"I can't wait to use them in a research project about women in computing."
"When I went to our computer teachers before school to deliver these cards, I couldn't help but notice the labs were mostly full of boys. The teachers, esp. those who teach younger kids, promised to get these in the hands of girls."
"When I went to our computer teachers before school to deliver these cards, I couldn't help but notice the labs were mostly full of boys. The teachers, esp. those who teach younger kids, promised to get these in the hands of girls."

This teacher finished by saying: "In fact, they are starting a computing and technology club for girls."

On that note, goodnight everyone! I hope you're having a good 2015 so far.

Tasha Turner likes this update.

Comments

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    1. Jessica Dickinson Goodman Creator on

      Agreed! Boys and men need to be supporters of women in computing, whether they're dads or classmates, bosses or direct-reports, historians or history students. But what is cool about this project is, unlike most educational products ever, it was designed for women's eyes and needs and interests and boys are the auxiliary audience. It's great--fantastic and necessary even--if boys find value in the cards, but it is make-or-break that they work for girls. It's just another fun way to shift the default from male to person. I'm glad boys liked the cards too!

    2. dawn korade on

      I know the primary purpose of these cards is to provide role models to girls, and I noticed that a teacher commented about classes full of boys and starting a girls tech club, but remember that it is equally important for the boys to know that women have been and are a big part of the history of computers too!