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Frog God Games reveals the next Lost Lands piece with The Blight, for Pathfinder, Swords & Wizardry, (and now!) 5e.
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It Came From Between 4!!!

Posted by Frog God Games (Creator)
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Back again so soon? My, you are an anxious audience of inquisitive little peepers aren't you? What's that? Oh, I left you strapped to the chair from last time. I'm sure the cleaning lady will be along soon enough to sweep up any remains. No worries; she's always very good about cleaning the chairs.

So let's delve back into the darkness that the Tome of Blighted Horrors has to offer. Let's start with a splash into the Great Lyme River and Fetid Sea.

Lyme Angler
Lyme Angler

Colloquially known as the slop-shark, the Lyme angler is one of the big fish of the river and nearby sea. And as a Huge animal, his appetite easily matches his bite. No worries, though. At night you'll see the ghostly glow of his luminous lure dimly moving beneath the oily waters to give you a least a bit of warning. During the day, however, well during the day you might just want to avoid the water.

Sough-Eel
Sough-Eel

Not to be outdone, the Lyme River's other major occupant and counterpart of the slop-shark is the sough-eel. This guy as another Huge river predator is a strong proponent of population control and does his part whenever anyone gets too close to the water. You might think the slop-shark and sough-eel would compete and maybe start feeding on each other, but they don't. They both figured out early on that the other tastes terrible. And with all the corpses that find themselves dumped in the Lyme (and sometimes more wiggly treats), they're both happy to predate upon the hairless apes that call the Blight home.

An interesting bit of etymology. Like most things of the Blight, the sough-eel name and concept originated in Richard Pett's head, but when I wrote Bloody Jack for him many years ago I statted it up and made it the monster in its current incarnation. And here we run into some of the interesting vagaries of British English vs. American English. I ran Bloody Jack several times in 2009-2010 at Paizo Con, Pacific Con, and North Texas RPG Con and referred to the sough-eel with the pronunciation of "sow eel". Meanwhile Richard was running The Crucible and other Blight related events at cons overseas and all that time was referring to it with the pronunciation "suff eel". We didn't discover our discrepancy until a phone conversation last year. So what's the official pronunciation that we came to on it? Why both, of course, some in Castorhage call it the suff-eel and some call it the sow-eel and both groups look at the other as uncultured barbarians making a mockery of their shared Common tongue.

I always think it's nice when art imitates life. :-)  Wait, is that how it goes?

Darklord, Jeremy Hochhalter, and 6 more people like this update.

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    1. Ryan Blackstock
      Superbacker
      on

      Ok, guess I am going to have to break down and buy the JAWS soundtrack!