$2,691
pledged of $100,000pledged of $100,000 goal
29
backers
Funding Unsuccessful
The project's funding goal was not reached on Sat, March 23 2019 4:07 AM UTC +00:00
Tony YickBy Tony Yick
First created
Tony YickBy Tony Yick
First created
$2,691
pledged of $100,000pledged of $100,000 goal
29
backers
Funding Unsuccessful
The project's funding goal was not reached on Sat, March 23 2019 4:07 AM UTC +00:00

About

Culinatti - The safest cookware for your family


Culinatti Everyday Pan
Culinatti Everyday Pan

Hi! We are foodies who love to cook at home…

And we've tried many brands of cookware.  We wanted to own cookware with the following attributes: completely non-toxic, affordable, long-lasting, and easy-to-use. Sounds simple enough but we have been disappointed time and again.  

So for the last year, we researched all of the different materials available for making cookware and visited dozens of manufacturers that produce cookware for most of the well-known brands in hopes of finding cookware right for us, and discovered the obvious; profit is the only motivation for the big brands.  The only way to get what we really want and need is to cut out the big brands, and deal directly with the manufacturers.  

That is why we established Culinatti from our home base in Northern California and did the research to learn how to make cookware with all of the attributes.  We are hoping to find backers, like us, that want to cook with peace of mind.  Our research (see below: THE RESEARCH) has been simplified into a table and footnotes so that backers can educate themselves before deciding whether to back our campaign.  We did not make a fancy video because we want backers' money to go back into manufacturing the best product.  We will also package the final product in sturdy shipping boxes with minimal printing to avoid added expenses and to be environmentally conscious. 

Our first piece is called the Culinatti Everyday Pan and it is a 3-ply, full clad, 5 qt. ceramic coated nonstick saute pan.  It is a pan with generous capacity that you'll turn to for most, if not all of your cooking.  

FEATURES AND BENEFITS:

Non-toxic ceramic nonstick interior is completely free of PTFE, PFOA, PFAS, lead, and cadmium.
Non-toxic ceramic nonstick interior is completely free of PTFE, PFOA, PFAS, lead, and cadmium.

The Culinatti Everyday Pan will have a completely non-toxic ceramic nonstick interior.  The coating is the only one that is FDA certified and is manufactured in Italy by a U.S. based company that has been around since 1969.  Ceramic nonstick coating is essentially silicon and oxygen, the main ingredients of sand.  No adhesive is used, as it is baked on, so nothing gets released during cooking.


3-ply, full clad pan is optimized for any type of cooktop, including induction
3-ply, full clad pan is optimized for any type of cooktop, including induction

With a thick aluminum core encapsulated by a 304 stainless steel interior and 430 stainless steel exterior, the Culinatti Everyday Pan will heat quickly and evenly, and will retain heat well. You'll be able to sear meats and no more soggy stir fries. Induction cooktops will be more efficient due to the ferritic property of the 430 stainless steel exterior.


Stay cool handle is designed for optimum control and a place to put your cooking utensil.
Stay cool handle is designed for optimum control and a place to put your cooking utensil.

The stay cool handle is designed so that you won't need to place your cooking utensil on the counter-top nor the cooktop, making for easy cleanup.  The handle is also oven proof so that you can finish off your steaks with the broiler (handle will get hot in oven).

Flared rim for clean, easy, non-drip pouring
Flared rim for clean, easy, non-drip pouring

The Culinatti Everyday Pan will have a flared rim to keep the outside and bottom of the pan clean, which means clean cooktops and less time in the kitchen.

Glass lid with silicone rim
Glass lid with silicone rim

To prevent the lid from chipping the nonstick coating of the pan, we are providing a silicone rimmed glass lid.  Constructed of tempered glass and silicone, it is heat resistant and can even oven safe to 350°F.  It is also gentle on your counter-tops and cooktop.

THE SPECIFICATIONS

Dimensions:  11.25" diameter (rim) 10" diameter (base)

Weight: 4.3 lbs.  (5.3 lbs. with lid)

Satin finish exterior for easy cleaning

Oven and broiler safe to 600°F (lid to 350°F)

THE RESEARCH

We are nerds and have done all of the research for those backers that want to be well informed.  We have compiled the information into an easy to understand table plus footnotes for further details (for other nerds, like us):

For more information, please see corresponding footnotes below:
For more information, please see corresponding footnotes below:

FOOTNOTE

Toxicity:

1.  Cast iron pans can leach a little bit of iron while cooking, even when properly seasoned, depending on what you cook. Acidic or alkaline foods will weaken the seasoning and iron will leach into the food. While iron is a natural mineral in our body, and is fine in small amounts, too much iron can cause hemochromatosis in certain people.

2.  Carbon steel pans are 96-99% iron so the same principle applies that cooking acidic and alkaline foods will cause iron to leach into the food.

3.  Aluminum is the third most abundant metal in the world and is cheap because 2/3rd of the aluminum ever made is still in existence and is constantly being recycled.  Aluminum is 100% recyclable and only takes 5% of the energy to recycle than it did to originally make it. This is great for industry but aluminum is actually not ideal for making food. Aluminum is actually a neurotoxin and is highly toxic to the human body. Once the non-stick coating is scratched and acidic food comes into contact with the bare aluminum, there is a high likelihood of leaching aluminum into the food. To see why soda cans can be made of aluminum, take a look at this link:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fxiK0fzvS8 

4.  Anodized aluminum is a hardened aluminum but is aluminum nonetheless. Any scratches will negate the benefits of the anodization and you’re back to cooking with a toxic metal (see 3).

5.  Copper cookware is usually lined with tin, steel, or nickel. The danger is if the cookware is scratched and bare copper is revealed, which can leach into the food and cause copper poisoning.

6.  Stainless steel (18/8 or 18/10) is one of the most corrosion resistant materials making it the safest material you can cook with. Acidic foods just don’t react at all with stainless steel. Aluminum is sandwiched in between two pieces of stainless steel for partial or full clad cookware for faster and more even heat conduction but food will never interact with the encapsulated aluminum.

Non-stick toxicity:

7.  Cast iron and carbon steel aren’t nonstick until properly seasoned which can be done  by baking with oil with a high smoke point such as coconut oil or even lard.

8.  There are really only two types of nonstick coating and those are PTFE or Ceramic. 

PTFE (PolyTetraFluoroEthylene) is a thermoplastic polymer made from the Polymerization of TFE (TetraFluoroEthylene). TFE is synthesized from fluorite (also known as fluorspar), hydrofluoric acid, and chloroform. Globally, PTFE is a $3 billion dollar market and the Teflon tradename is a $1 billion plus market for Chemours (spun out from Dupont), so they have basically sanitized the internet of everything related to Teflon and PTFE, and have plenty of lawyers to make anyone shut up about the toxicity but I'll put up a few links regarding each of the raw materials in TFE...

Fluorite: https://gizmodo.com/the-9-deadliest-minerals-weve-ever-mined-1638317799

Hydrofluoric acid: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrofluoric_acid

Chloroform: https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/chloroform#section=Top 

Ceramic coating is produced by a sol-gel (solution + gel-like) technology made from silicon and oxygen which is ceramic-like. The main ingredient is essentially silicon dioxide, the same stuff that can be naturally found in our body and in many plants such as leafy green vegetables, beets, brown rice, oats, alfalfa, etc. and is same in chemical structure as sand. 

9.  Copper pans are all lined with tin, nickel, or stainless steel. Tin is naturally nonstick but is soft and can scratch off easily revealing the bare copper, which can leach into the foods (see 5).

Thermal Conductivity:

10.  Cast iron is a poor conductor of heat and requires a long time to heat up.

11.  Carbon steel is 96-99% iron, which is a poor conductor and requires a long time to heat up.

12.  Aluminum and anodized aluminum are excellent heat conductors and will spread heat evenly and quickly. 

13.  Copper is 50% better than aluminum, making it the best conductor of heat out of all the materials we’ve listed.

14.  Stainless steel by itself is a poor conductor of heat, about the same as iron. 3-ply (or tri-ply) encapsulates aluminum between two layers of stainless steel to increase the thermal conductivity. Impact bonded cookware usually doesn't have aluminum encapsulated between two layers of steel but rather have an extra piece bonded to the bottom with air trapped in between and air happens to be an insulator (poor thermal conductor), which means that it will be worse than the 3-ply stainless steel.

Even Heating:

15.  Cast iron does not heat evenly and develops hot spots because the heat just doesn’t spread easily due to the fact that it is such a poor conductor.

16.  Carbon steel also doesn’t heat very evenly due to the fact that it is a poor conductor.

17.  Aluminum and anodized aluminum heat very evenly due to the high thermal conductivity of the material.

18.  Copper has the best thermal conductivity of all the materials and naturally the most even heating of all the materials listed.

19.  Stainless steel with an impact bonded bottom means that there is a disk of aluminum at the bottom of the pan. So while the heat may be evenly conducted across the bottom of the pan, the walls of the pan will heat unevenly and will have a different temperature than the bottom.

20.  Full clad, stainless steel 3-ply cookware will have aluminum encapsulated all the way up between the stainless steel and will provide very even heat distribution.

Heat Retention:

21.  Cast iron takes forever to heat up and that same property means that it sheds the heat slowly. It is great for searing food as it will not cool off very quickly. Carbon steel has basically the same thermal properties as cast iron and will stay hot for much longer than other materials.

22.  Aluminum and anodized aluminum are great conductors of heat so it’ll lose heat just as fast. If you throw a piece of cold food in the pan, the temperature will drop very quickly.

23.  Copper has the highest thermal conductivity and will have the lowest heat retention of all the materials mentioned.

24.  Stainless steel (impact bonded or tri-ply) is a poor conductor but the aluminum is there to help conduct and disperse the heat. The heat is retained in the stainless steel and makes it ideal for searing foods, if needed.

Food Interaction:

25.  Cast iron and carbon steel, even with proper seasoning, are still highly reactive to acidic and salty foods. Simmer these foods for a long time and the acids will break down the seasoning, allowing the material to interact with the foods.

26.  With nonstick, depending on whether the coating is PTFE or Ceramic, the interactions will be limited. PTFE manufacturers do recommend avoiding storing acidic or salty foods whereas ceramic coatings are completely inert to acidic and salty foods.

27.  Bare copper is highly reactive to foods, but all copper cookware is lined so depending on the lining, it will have little to no interaction with acidic foods.

28.  Stainless steel has the least food interaction but due to the nickel content, it is still not recommended that acidic or salty foods be stored in stainless steel cookware.

Food Release:

29.  Cast iron and carbon steel, when seasoned correctly, will have very good food release. The nonstick properties are excellent as long as the seasoning is not interrupted by heavy cleaning or a dishwasher, which will cause food to stick and destroy the food release properties.

30.  Nonstick coatings in PTFE and Ceramic forms have evolved to the point where food release is excellent. Ceramic will require a little bit of oil but PTFE can have excellent food release properties, even with no oil.

31.  Copper cookwares food release property will depend on the lining, Tin will have good food release properties while steel will require a learning curve and will be poor until one has mastered proper preheating of the pan and not putting cold food into the pan.

32.  Stainless steel can have good food release properties if mastered, but it requires patiently preheating the pan to the perfect temperature and not putting cold food into the pan.

Weight:

33.  Copper can be very heavy if it is a high quality cookware. 

Maintenance:

34.  Cast iron and carbon steel should not be scrubbed, cannot be thrown in a dishwasher, and cannot be soaked. Doing so will cause the seasoning to break down and create a nice rusty mess, and will require re-seasoning of the cookware.

35.  Aluminum cannot be soaked right after cooking. Doing so will cause it to warp as aluminum is a soft metal that has high thermal conductivity which means it can suffer thermal shock. 

36.  Anodized aluminum is hardened via anodization but soaking right after cooking is still highly not recommended and will ruin the cookware.

37.  With copper cookware, the tin lining may need to be relined from time to time and the copper on the outside will oxidize and change colors. Keeping copper cookware looking good requires a lot of TLC.

38.  Stainless steel (impact bonded or tri-ply) is very easy to maintain, it can be soaked and it is dishwasher safe.

Dishwasher Safe:

39.  Cast iron and carbon steel will require re-seasoning, which is a multi-hour event after going through a dishwasher due to the need to remove the rust.

40.  Aluminum and anodized aluminum cookware with nonstick coatings are for the most part dishwasher safe. The harsh detergents will shorten the lifespan of most nonstick coatings and will lighten the color of anodized aluminum.

41.  Stainless steel cookware is corrosion resistant and completely dishwasher safe. In fact, dishwasher interiors are made of stainless steel.

Glass Cooktop Safe:

42.  Cast iron can have burrs that can scratch and ruin a glass cooktop. Additionally, because it is has poor thermal conductivity and is slow to absorb heat, once heated up on high heat, it can retain an intense amount of heat which is transferred back to the cooktop which can cause the element to shut down as a response to the temperature limiters built in. Also, because the pan cannot be heavily washed, the seasoning on the pan will leave a residue on the cooktop that needs to be cleaned every single time.

43.  Carbon steel cookware is okay as long as the cookware has a flat bottom and is smooth to avoid scratching. Because the pan cannot be heavily washed though, and the seasoning on the pan will leave a residue on the cooktop that needs to be cleaned every single time.

44.  Aluminum is ideal for glass cooktops but aluminum residue often appears on a cooktop due to the heat and soft metal combination. If cleaned immediately, it will not be a problem but if left on, it will look like scratches and become permanent.

45.  Anodized aluminum is ideal for glass cooktops and is harder than aluminum so the residue issue is less likely to occur (see 45).

46.  Copper bottom pans are okay for glass cooktops but e can leave residues that look like scratches. These can be removed if cleaned immediately. High heat on a copper pan will leave a permanent stain on glass cooktops.

47.  Stainless steel with impact bonded bottoms are good for glass cooktops but the bottoms are usually of a lower grade steel and aluminum, and will leave residues on a glass cooktop. The residue can be removed if cleaned immediately.

48.  Stainless steel tri-ply is the most ideal because it combines the durability and stability of stainless steel with the heat conduction and distribution of aluminum. The stainless steel will not scratch nor leave any residues on a glass cooktop.

Induction Capable:

49.  Aluminum, hard anodized aluminum, and copper are nonmagnetic so these will not work on an induction cooktop unless a magnetic plate is fused to the bottom and many have magnetic plates that are smaller in diameter than the actual pan, meaning that you may not be able to use the largest induction hob.

50.  Stainless steel with an impact bonded bottom is induction compatible but because the bottom is a separate piece that is bonded on, more often than not it will cause a buzzing noise when used on an induction cooktop that can get quite loud.

51.  Stainless steel 3-ply, if the exterior ply is 430 stainless steel, is very magnetic and will be highly efficient on an induction cooktop. 304 stainless steel is not magnetic and will not work on an induction cooktop.

Risks and challenges

The main risk we see is in the manufacturing process but we travel to China and supervise the production to insure that we get the exact product and quality we are paying for. The other risk is tariffs increasing due to negotiations breaking down in a trade war but the manufacturer has agreed to share that risk. All other risks and challenges have been mitigated due to the exhaustive research that has been done and the careful selection of a manufacturer that manufactures for the biggest names in cookware.

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    Culinatti 5qt. saute pan

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    5 qt. saute pan made of full clad, thick aluminum core encapsulated in stainless steel, with completely non-toxic ceramic nonstick interior. Other brands with similar features retails for at least $159.

    Includes:
    • Silicone rimmed, vented tempered glass lid
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    Culinatti 5qt. saute pan

    EARLY BIRD! Limited Quantity: 250

    5 qt. saute pan made of full clad, thick aluminum core encapsulated in stainless steel, with completely non-toxic ceramic nonstick interior. Other brands with similar features retails for at least $159.

    Includes:
    • Silicone rimmed, vented tempered glass lid
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    Pledge $75 or more About $75

    Culinatti 5qt. saute pan

    5 qt. saute pan made of full clad, thick aluminum core encapsulated in stainless steel, with completely non-toxic ceramic nonstick interior. Other brands with similar features retails for at least $159.

    Includes:
    • Silicone rimmed, vented tempered glass lid
    Less
    Estimated delivery
    Ships to Only certain countries
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