Share this project

Done

Share this project

Done
The Most Beautiful Room in the World's video poster
Play

A great unknown masterpiece and architectural enigma is explored by a forensic architect, artist and documentary filmmaker. Read more

88
backers
$10,693
pledged of $30,000 goal
0
seconds to go

Funding Unsuccessful

This project's funding goal was not reached on .

A great unknown masterpiece and architectural enigma is explored by a forensic architect, artist and documentary filmmaker.

Recent updates

Photos

Thank you for your support!!


Dear Kickstarter Supporters,

I'm sorry we didn't reach our ambitious goal on this go around to support our movie, "The Most Beautiful Room in the World."  That doesn't mean it's not a great story at an advanced stage...    

We'll most likely try again very soon.  Many of you have already expressed a desire to be contacted again to help support a second try.  If you'd like to go to the website mostbeautifulroom.com and use the contact button to send me your email address, I'll keep you posted.  

I have many other ideas cooking, as well.  So, this WILL end up as a wonderful short documentary, one way or another.

My sincere gratitude for this incredible display of support and trust,

Until later,

Richard

Walt Whitman's and Latrobe's vision

America by Walt Whitman: Centre of equal daughters, equal sons, All, all alike endear’d, grown, ungrown, young or old, Strong, ample, fair, enduring, capable, rich, Perennial with the Earth, with Freedom, Law and Love, A grand, sane, towering, seated Mother, Chair’d in the adamant of Time. http://www.whitmanarchive.org/multimedia/index.html Go here and listen to Whitman speak the first four lines in his own voice. Amazing that Whitman's powerful metaphor and Latrobe's powerful vision of perhaps fifty years earlier evoke the same message, as if they're reading the same sheet of music. Tell people about the importance of this project!! Richard PS: Apologies for formatting here! I'm at the DQ in McMinnville TN using wifi on an iPhone.

Latrobe by marriage...


Very cool... !!  I received a wonderful letter and contribution from my former Fine Arts Professor from Vanderbilt, Hamilton Hazlehurst.  I asked him if he is related to Latrobe's wife, Mary Elizabeth (Hazlehurst) Latrobe.  He is!!  MEL is an aunt (removed several generations, obviously)!  That's so neat.

Okay Kickstarters... keep liking this and keep telling people.  Time's a ticking.  

This movie project is a fantastic opportunity for sponsorship/advertising.  If you are a Philanthropic organization or a great LLC who believes in giving back to America, your Sponsorship name will be blasted on this screen for quite some time; WETA has given me the nod for national syndication, should I raise the right amount of money.

Cheers,

Richard

A new architectural history

As Latrobe himself said, "To give an adequate idea of a building by a description unaccompanied by drawings, is always a vain attempt..."

Rather than presenting a list of attributes, or architectural specifications, our project recreates the Latrobe/Jefferson lost neoclassical masterpieces with rigorous research... but presents them as 3D and 2D experiences within the realm of light, atmosphere, and material... a new way of architectural history.

My article on the design development of Miss Liberty (1807-1814) came out last week in this French journal.  Check it out on page 67:

http://crg.polytechnique.fr/v2/fic/Le%20Libellio%20ete%202012.pdf

Keep passing around the word, Kickstarters!  Thank you!!

Cheers,

Richard

Support growing!


Support is growing for our project!  We'll get this fabulous story of American art and architecture out there one way or another.

Last week I was given a private walk-around tour of the Capitol by a Senator who loves history and loves letters... it was a great thrill.  He knew a lot about Latrobe, and others, and even showed me the small chamber where Samuel Morse sent the very first telegraph message from in 1844.  

Besides inventing the telegraph, Morse was an accomplished painter.  His painting of the Hall of Congress from 1822 is hanging in the Corcoran Museum.  We're doing what Morse did; we're documenting these masterpieces of American art for future generations.

We've had a flurry of donations from one of the top architectural preservation firms in the nation, Quinn Evans... very exciting.

More to come...

Cheers,

Richard