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The project's funding goal was not reached on Sun, September 16 2018 11:47 AM UTC +00:00
Val AthanassiouBy Val Athanassiou
First created
Val AthanassiouBy Val Athanassiou
First created
AU$ 711
pledged of AU$ 8,000pledged of AU$ 8,000 goal
5
backers
0seconds to go
Funding Unsuccessful
The project's funding goal was not reached on Sun, September 16 2018 11:47 AM UTC +00:00

About

Brandmark used with kind permission Department of Premier and Cabinet Victoria
Brandmark used with kind permission Department of Premier and Cabinet Victoria

Auspiced byFilms4change Inc. Registered charity with DGR status ABN 99268852656

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www.the100.org.au

Introduction

A Digital Archive for Generations to access without restriction. Visual and Audio recordings, offering an insight into the Minds and Hearts of Women and Men No matter race, colour, creed or persuasion Who experienced Great Challenges However Focusing on Personal Achievements During and Post Military Service. We give you the Veteran and the Modern Australian Peacekeeper.

Vision

The project will be a digital archive containing the transcribed audio-visual interviews of service men and women involved, no matter race, colour, creed or persuasion.   

It is designed to be an Educational resource and focus on the achievements of our service personnel, achievements, in their words, to be proud of, both during and post military service. 

We will interview ex-service personnel who will volunteer their time, and share their stories in a comfortable, safe and cathartic environment. 

We will produce, as an initial milestone, 100 individual, short form vignettes, between 2 to three minutes in length The interviews will be housed within a bespoke, secure online database that will allow individuals to search via keywords or phrases. 

We will also draw on the expertise of mental health professionals, advocates and published authors familiar with the subject matter.

Through this not for profit venture, we will share the lived experience across generations with the service men and women who will follow, inform and educate them, their families, community and nation. 

The first 100 interviews will be our initial milestone and continue from there and will be donated to not only our supporters; Australian Peacekeepers and Peacemakers Veterans Association, Vietnam Veterans Association, RSL Victoria, Eastern Regional Libraries Corporation Victoria, City of Greater Dandenong, Yarra Ranges Council, City of Knox, Department of Education and Training Victoria, but also to The Australian War Memorial, The National Library, The Australian Defence Force, NFSA, VSO’s, ESO’s, councils, schools, and educational and not-for-profit organisations across community and nation, that may express an interest in our outcomes.

By The Left and WVNA
By The Left and WVNA

PROJECT MANAGERS

AUSPICE ORGANISATION  

Films4Change Inc. (F4C) ABN 99 268 852 656 / INC1500455 The object of Films4Change Inc. is to operate as a not for profit Organisation producing short films that educate and create awareness of relevant social issues within the community. The aim is for our films to be distributed at no cost to the consumer and utilised in support groups within various community organisations & educational settings. We are solely relying on funding from community grants, gifted funds & volunteered skills to produce the films. We are officially endorsed with DGR status and listed on the Register of Cultural Organisations. Our recent partnering with San Diego USA based RTI Projects.org means our marketing and distribution reach is now international, complementing our domestic relationships. We have partnered with & made films for Relationships Australia (Men's Behaviour Change Programs), Central Coast Neighbourhood Centres Alliance, Primary Care (Family Wellbeing Program), Eventing NSW, CALD Groups (Northern Settlement Services), Catholic Care, Interrelate & CC Women's Health Centre, Mission Australia, Salvation Army and Mental Health Carers Australia (formerly ARAFMI). 2018 will see further projects in Victoria, with Dandenong Ranges Music Council, Kew Neighbourhood Learning Centre and City of Boorondara. Recent successfully discharged grants • Wallarah 2 Coal project which assisted in funding the production of ‘Its Just a Choice’ a series of 9 short films focusing on Domestic Violence and Men’s Behavioural Change programs. • Central Coast Council funded a 3 day film production workshop with young people whereby short films were created that looked at respectful behaviour towards others. This was produced in conjunction with the Salvation Army and Oasis Centre Wyong  

Valman Productions

Val Athanassiou
Val Athanassiou

ABN 26 993 478 070 WCC 1049416A-01 Justice of the Peace 214812

Val was born in Broken Hill, to parents of mixed heritage, his Italian mother, a Farmer, his Romanian/Greek Father, a Surveyor; a job that saw the family shift across Australia, from Cootamundra to Sydney, all of which has contributed to giving Val a particular grounding and keen perspective into the immigrant way of life. Grass roots. Salt of the Earth. Family focused. A formidable Actor trained in a number of disciplines, his solid work ethic ensures he is in constant pursuit of training and personal development, having worked as a Rural Firefighter, Coast Guard, JP, Firearms Instructor and holds a variety of real world qualifications in Scuba, Civil Construction, Boating, Forklift Operation and Firearms to name a few. Founded in 2008, his production company has been keenly involved in Mental Health Initiatives, co-founding the Recovery Through Film and Food initiative in association with Mental Health Carers Australia. Val currently teaches film workshops to disabled children under the Digital Futures program and assists in digital marketing in association with Victorian based not for profit organisations, Kew Neighbourhood Learning Centre, Dandenong Ranges Music Council and Burke & Beyond.  

Mick Quinn
Mick Quinn

ANGEL SUPPORTERS

            

John Wells OAM President Dandenong / Cranbourne RSL  

Advocates Michael Quinn & John McNeill Australian Peacekeeper and Peacemaker Veterans Association (APPVA VIC)  

Joseph Cullen CEO Eastern Regional Libraries Corp Victoria (ERL)  

Kellie Dadds Women Veterans Network of Australia (WVNA)   

Bob Elworthy AM President Vietnam Veterans Association (VVAA VIC)

Cr John Mortimore Knox City Council  

Cr Noel Cliff Yarra Ranges Council  

Reverend Andrew Klein Outreach Ministries Victoria  

An (Andy) Huu Nguyen Secretary ARVN Rangers Association Victoria

John McCourt CEO Returned and Services League Western Australia

John Wells OAM
John Wells OAM

PRODUCTION PARTNERS 

Chris Walker March Digital  

A professional Web Development company with twenty two years of experience, whose clients include; the Department of Education and Training, Intel, Westpac, Optus, 3M, Fairfax, Ardex, Fresenius, Sony BMG. CEO Chris Walker runs the company in a hands-on fashion as their Lead Developer. He is the recipient of a Walkley Award and a Guinness World Record Holder in Arts and Media. March Digital experience and expertise also encompasses Video Marketing, Animation and Multimedia, with an in-house studio, skilled producers and full production and editing facilities they have the capability to produce at every scale from a simple video testimonial or product demonstration to a full-blown, high definition, 4K, multi-camera video production.  

Rokk Lattanzio Vociferous Music  

With decades of experience as a producer, engineer and session musician on three continents, Rokk Lattanzio oversees all in house productions. Aided by a team of talented, dedicated and diverse musicians, there are few styles of music he can’t produce. He composes for Film, Web and TV. Past placements on US Network TV and Cable Channels (A & E, Fox Sports), along with a number of independent films in Australia and the USA along with various Web TV Channel placements including Chelsea TV (Chelsea UK Premier League Club’s Web Channel).     

Konrad McCarthy Electric Suitcase  

Cinematographer, Director, Colourist and Editor, Konrad’s skills are varied, making him our preferred choice as DOP and Second Unit Director for the duration of the project.  

DISTRIBUTION PARTNERS 

AUSPOL Media  

Founder and Director Guy Perrine is very excited to be a part of The 100 project, and believes it is a unique and extremely interesting initiative. An extensive foreign and domestic distribution network in place.

Films4Change Inc  

The objects of the organisation Films4Change are to operate as a not for profit organisation producing films that educate & contribute to creating awareness of relevant social issues within the community. A growing foreign and domestic distribution network.  

Young Veterans 

Young Veterans work alongside and in conjunction with RSL's and ESO's across Australia to assist and educate veterans of all conflicts on their entitlements and potential outlets available for them to utilise.  

RSL WA  

The Archive collection of the WA State Branch of the RSL contains archival material that has been generated in the day to day running of the WA State Branch of the RSL. The collection also includes archive material from sub-branches that span the length and breadth of the State. Current membership 8,000.  

APPVA  

A vaunted organisation, The Australian Peacekeeper and Peacemaker Veterans’ Association is a not-for-profit veterans organisation that provides for the comfort and assistance with welfare and entitlements for ADF Veterans and Peacekeepers, including their families. Current constituency 77,000 veterans.  

Eastern Regional Libraries Corporation Victoria  

Eastern Regional Libraries is a co-operative venture of three outer eastern metropolitan councils - Knox, Maroondah and Yarra Ranges, serving a population of over 410,000 residents.  

Dandenong / Cranbourne RSL  

Dandenong RSL with it’s 5,000 + membership base, will be the venue for the official launch of the project thus providing a further opportunity to display the work of The 100, via social media networks currently in excess of 2,000 members, in house screening, monthly newsletters and a website, all of which will be used as a platform to share the outcomes of The 100 and further spread awareness of the project during production and upon completion.

MARKETING SUPPORT

Shannon Nagyivan Communications & Customer Service City of Greater Dandenong  

Anya Murray Acting Manager Communications & Customer Service City of Greater Dandenong  

Greg Betros General Manager Dandenong / Cranbourne RSL  

Casey Neill Journalist  

Pheona Smoczyńska Radio Eastern FM 98.1  

Paul Copeland Editor Australian Peacekeeper Magazine  

Craig Anderson Editor Australian Peacekeeper Magazine

CONSULTANTS AND MENTORS  

Victoria Shaw BA (Hons) Psych, Dip. Psychotherapy, ASIST accreditation (suicide counselling), Crisis counsellor  

Fiona Quinn Treasurer APPVA VIC  

Dave Menz Vice President APPVA VIC  

By The Left - A Women Veterans Initiative  

Dr. Renate Thienel PhD Hunter Medical Research Institute  

Erin Higgins, Rhonda Boyle, Anne Steadman Mental Health Carers Australia (formerly ARAFMI)  

Elena Terol Sabino Senior Project Officer - Mindframe Hunter Institute of Mental Health  

Ellen Sproule Senior Media and Public Relations Advisor SANE Australia  

Reverend Andrew Klein Outreach Ministries Victoria  

Jaymie Knight NSW Mental Health  

Dr. Robert Marchand PhD  

Dean Mighell ELP Founder Path of The Horse

Path of the Horse
Path of the Horse

MECHANICS OF THE INTERVIEW PROCESS  

Interview Format - Approaching Individuals  

Our research and interaction with Mental Health Professionals, Former and Current Service Personnel and Peer Workers has assisted us in identifying several current and appropriate approaches based on Trauma Intervention;  

• Seeking Safety  

• Sanctuary Mode  

• Risking Connection  

• Addiction and Trauma Recovery Integration  

• Trauma Recovery and Empowerment Model  

• Trauma, Addiction, Mental Health, and Recovery  

• Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy  

The approach we identified & agreed upon as most appropriate; 

• The Essence of Being Real  

The Essence of Being Real model is a peer-to-peer approach intended to address the effects of trauma. This approach is particularly helpful for survivor groups, first responders, and frontline service providers and agency staff. It is geared to promoting ‘relationships’ rather than focusing on the “bad stuff that happened.”  

“Positive Psychology”

MECHANICS OF THE DIGITAL ARCHIVE  

Implement YOO Theme's ZOO Content Creation Kit components for Joomla to facilitate the deployment of a bespoke online application where site users can search for and view content specific videos. The search feature makes use of video transcriptions, clickable links and word clouds (a series of key words associated with videos). The 100 Website Core Functionality;  

• A database driven, online resource, users could view testimonial videos categorized either by topic or by name;  

• Users would be able to select a list of videos based on a specific predetermined list of either topics or names; • Users could view a list of videos from a specific individual;  

• Interview placeholders can be chosen as a still of the subject or a predetermined image;  

• Community and Nation to be given free and unfettered access to the database;  

• Audio recordings for public access;  

• Visual recordings for public access.  

“Encapsulate”  

The 100 Website Transcription Functionality;  

• Via the Joomla based ZOO Content Builder a Website Front End Search Facility will be created whereby users can execute searches using keywords or topics.  

• Each video will be transcribed into small text documents and the transcription imported and associated (linked) with the video.  

• Each transcription will be further integrated into a larger database, enabling a refined result whereby all interviews flagged by the relevant word or topic will be displayed for playback.  

• Transcriptions may be downloadable but will be subject to a Creative Commons Attribution as determined by all Stakeholders.  

• Visual Interviews may be downloadable but will be subject to a Creative Commons Attribution as determined by all Stakeholders.  

• Audio Interviews may be downloadable but will be subject to a Creative Commons Attribution as determined by all Stakeholders.  

• Visual Interviews can also be converted to Audio only and may be downloadable but will be subject to a Creative Commons Attribution as determined by all Stakeholders.  

• Transcriptions can be refined further and be displayed as Sub (or Sur) Titles.

PROJECT OVERVIEW  

WHO WILL MANAGE THE PROJECT ONGOING  

Valman Productions Will ultimately guide and manage in a “hands on” approach, the project to completion and provide ongoing support, and continue to assist in further interviews beyond the original goal of The 100.  

Films4Change Inc. The auspice organisation will be responsible for all legal and financial matters and as a registered not for profit charity, will discharge all grant monies. They will be be involved in the daily management of production and oversee the project to completion.

ByronBayFilmco Will be involved in production and continue to assist in further interviews beyond the original goal of The 100.  

However, our ultimate vision is to donate the project. Maintaining initiatives of this type come with great responsibility, hence donating the archive to the War Memorial, the RSL and the National Film and Sound Archive is part of our vision. While the database will be freely available for all to access we have identified certain organisations who will also be interested in only certain portions of the project.  

The National Vietnam Veterans Museum, manager Phil Dressing has expressed an interest in the interviews focusing on Vietnam War veterans only, as his Museum is dedicated to the service personnel of that conflict.  The Vietnam Veterans Association have also expressed interest in those facets of the project. We believe this interest in accessibility to both the whole and/or in part only adds value to the short form vignette, allowing greater flexibility in distribution.    

“Recognition”

Peacekeepers
Peacekeepers

PRODUCTION TIMELINE  

Pre-Production - Underway  

• Advocates Michael Quinn and John McNeill of APPVA to identify and invite appropriate individuals to interview.  

• There will be no guidelines for individual selection other than those advised by Michael Quinn and John McNeill, otherwise individuals can hail from any area of the Australian Defense Force.  

• Project manager to explore other “frontline” personnel e.g. AFP, Paramedic, etc.  

• Interview format to be developed with stake-holders/partners and categorised in the following manner; Film or Audio Only Then sub categorised as Location (RSL) Location (Other)  

• Appearance releases to be issued to individuals, signed, returned and logged with pick-list per individual of photos/memorabilia etc. to be brought along to interview.  

• Co-ordinate with SANE on questions and delivery.  

 Finalise topics, questions and interview format in conjunction with production team, stakeholders, advocates and APPVA. Note: there will need to be a number of prescribed questions/answers specifically for the purposes of audio transcription and the subsequent online transcription search system.  

• Pitch, concept and storyboarding to be developed and agreed upon for the “look and feel” of the vignettes and overall presentation style.  

• Vignettes proposed to be between one to two minutes in length unless of particular insight and content. Opening and end credits add approximately 30 seconds with acknowledgements in place.  

• AUSPOL MEDIA Marketing and Distribution Agreement Discussed.  

• Trailer to be completed with an initial four to six individuals. Note: These individuals are of the understanding that we will return to interview them again, as this is only a “proof of concept” for the purposes of exhibiting to Key Stakeholders.  

• Trailer to be released to all Key Stakeholders via EPK or secure link to be approved for distribution across all relevant contact lists, email contact lists and networks.  

• Initial interviews with Production Crew and Advocates in the form of Editorials/Marketing with Boronia & Basin Community News, Dandenong and Cranbourne RSL Newsletters.  

• City of Greater Dandenong Editorials to be published.  

• City of Knox Editorials to be published.  

• Funding Opportunities and Donations to be researched and applied for.

• Shoot planning, call-sheets and time-sheets to be finalised.  

• Mindframe, SANE and participants to critique the trailer before the final edit is released.  

• AUSPOL MEDIA Marketing and Distribution Agreement Finalised.  

• Social Media and Traditional Media awareness program to commence.

Shoot – Month 1 2018  

• Equipment Hire Checklist Blackmagic 4K Production Camera SSD Media GH4 B Camera Rode Audio (lavaliers and boom) Zoom F8 Multitrack Recorder Softbox/LED three point lighting Greenscreen lighting Curved motorized slider Linear slider Greenscreen Rostra Camera for memorabilia photography  

• Transportation.  

• Catering / Refreshments for RSL location filming.  

• Two to Four interviews per day or as convenient for the RSL and individuals.  

• Set-up/shoot/pack-up times estimated between 0830 and 1600.  

• 'Behind the scenes’ footage and stills to be shot, captured and logged daily.  

• Online/social media posts from 'behind the scenes' as required.  

• All data wrangling to occur at the conclusion of each day's filming; logged, tagged, reviewed, edited and transcribed.  

• Daily rough-cuts to be uploaded to secure online portal Frame.IO for content review and discussion.  

• Website design to be approved, construction commencing.  

• Survey monkey to be distributed to individuals and students after each day to gauge their experience.  

• Mindframe and SANE to critique the final edits prior to release.  

• AUSPOL MEDIA Marketing and Distribution Commences.  

Milestones; Interviews Complete. Website Construction Underway.

Downtime
Downtime

 Shoot - Month 2 2018   

• Equipment Hire Checklist Blackmagic 4K Production Camera SSD Media GH4 B Camera Rode Audio (lavaliers and boom) Zoom F8 Multitrack Recorder Softbox/LED three point lighting Greenscreen lighting Curved motorized slider Linear slider Greenscreen Rostra Camera for memorabilia photography  

• Transportation.  

• Catering / Refreshments for RSL location filming.  

• Two to Four interviews per day or as convenient for the RSL and individuals.  

• Set-up/shoot/pack-up times estimated between 0830 and 1600.  

• 'Behind the scenes’ footage and stills to be shot, captured and logged daily.  

• Online/social media posts from 'behind the scenes' as required.  

• All data wrangling to occur at the conclusion of each day's filming; logged, tagged, reviewed, edited and transcribed.  

• Daily rough-cuts to be uploaded to secure online portal (using Frame.IO) for content review and discussion.  

• Cuts reviewed and approved on secure portals Vimeo Pro and iMdB Pro.  

• Website construction and testing to continue with previews for Key Stakeholders.  

• Survey monkey to be distributed to individuals and students after each day to gauge their experience.  

• Mindframe and SANE to critique the final edits prior to release.  

• AUSPOL MEDIA Marketing and Distribution ongoing.  

Milestones; Interviews Complete. Website Construction and Testing.

Shoot – Month 3 2018  

• Equipment Hire Checklist Blackmagic 4K Production Camera SSD Media GH4 B Camera Rode Audio (lavaliers and boom) Zoom F8 Multitrack Recorder Softbox/LED three point lighting Greenscreen lighting Curved motorized slider Linear slider Greenscreen Rostra Camera for memorabilia photography  

• Transportation.  

• Catering / Refreshments for RSL location filming.  

• Two to Four interviews per day or as convenient for the RSL and individuals.  

• Set-up/shoot/pack-up times estimated between 0830 and 1600.  

• 'Behind the scenes’ footage and stills to be shot, captured and logged daily  

• Online/social media posts from 'behind the scenes' as required  

• All data wrangling to occur at the conclusion of each day's filming; logged, tagged, reviewed, edited and transcribed.  

• Daily rough-cuts to be uploaded to secure online portal (using Frame.IO) for content review and discussion.  

• Cuts reviewed and approved on secure portals Vimeo Pro and iMdB Pro.  

• Final Cuts to be archived to secure online portal Vimeo Pro. Password only access.  

• Transcription only for approved cuts.  

• Website design to be approved and construction and testing to run concurrently.  

• Survey monkey to be distributed to individuals after each day to gauge their experience.  

• Mindframe and SANE to critique the final edits prior to release.

Milestones; Interviews Complete. Database Construction and Testing. Archive Population. Transcription Population.

Post Production – Month 4 to 6 2018  

• Final mastering and grading of edits.  

• Uploading of finalised content to Vimeo (private) and links to be supplied for Website. Also via private Dropbox if required.  

• Key stakeholders and identified end-users including Creative Victoria, Department of Premier and Cabinet, Department of Education, APPVA, V VAA, RSL, project-partners to approve logos and credit wording and brand representation.  

• Testing and refinement of website ongoing.  

• Key stakeholders and identified end-users including Creative Victoria, Department of Premier and Cabinet, Department of Education and Training Victoria, APPVA, V VAA, RSL Victoria, City of Greater Dandenong, Yarra Ranges Council, City of Knox, project-partners, participants and select members of Community and Nation for comment and feedback on website and content.  

• Survey monkey to be distributed to Key stakeholders for feedback.  

• Any necessary changes and updates following feedback to be implemented.  

• Soft and hard launch timing to be discussed with Key Stakeholders.  

• Interviews to be conducted with Key stakeholders and identified end-users including Creative Victoria, Department of Premier and Cabinet, Department of Education and Training Victoria, APPVA, V VAA, RSL Victoria, City of Greater Dandenong, Yarra Ranges Council, City of Knox, project-partners, participants and select members of Community and Nation for 'behind the scenes' and 'making of' materials.  

• Co-ordinate with SANE to ensure the reporting quality is sensitive and responsible. • Mindframe to check before the final edits are released.  

• AUSPOL MEDIA Marketing and Distribution ongoing.  

Milestones; Final Edits and Website Complete. Partner Interviews Complete. Launch venue, date and invitee list to be finalised.

SUPPORT, MARKETING & DISTRIBUTION  

Phase 1 - Complete  

INITIAL AWARENESS  

• Website (www.the100.org.au)  

• Twitter • the1zerozero • recoverytff • valactor • films4change  

• Facebook • the1zerozero • recoverythroughfilmandfood • valactor • films4change  

• Instagram • the1zerozero • recoverythroughfilmandfood • valactor • films4change  

• IMBD (www.imdb.me/valathanassiou)  

• Vimeo • valmanproductions • films4change  

• LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/in/valathanassiou)  

• You Tube • valathanassiou • films4change

Phase 2 - Underway  

ONGOING ENGAGEMENT  

• Proof of Concept Trailer via  

o www.the100.org.au o www.films4change.org.au o www.valman.com.au

• Australian Peacekeeper Magazine (Global Circulation 77,000+)  

• Dandenong and Cranbourne RSL (Social Media, Email and Newsletter Reach 5,000+)  

• Films4Change & Valman Productions Email (Reach 1,600+)  

• AUSPOL (Facebook Reach 3,500+, Twitter Reach 500+ Instagram Reach 1,400+, LinkedIn Connections 2,100+, Email Reach 1,200+) • APPVA National (Social Media Circulation 2,300+)  

• VVAA - Vietnam Veterans Association - Victoria Branch (Social Media Circulation 600+)  

• RSL Victoria (Membership TBC, Social Media Circulation 6,000+)  

• RSL WA (Membership TBC, Social Media Circulation 6,000+)  

• Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of Australia (Social Media Circulation 7,300+)  

• Boronia & Basin Community News (Print Circulation 12,000+)  

• Dandenong Journal (Print and Electronic Circulation 48,000+ Readership 78,000+)  

• Star Journal (Electronic Circulation 75,000+)  

• The City Magazine (Print Circulation 75,000+)  

• Eastern Regional Libraries Corporation Victoria (eNewsletter, Social Media and Member Circulation 410,000+)  

• Film and Television Connection (Social Media Circulation 10,300+)  

• Film and TV Networking Australia (Social Media Circulation 16,700+)  

• Melbourne Independent Filmmakers and Actors (Social Media Circulation 7,100+)  

• Young Veterans RSL (Social Media Circulation 11,600+)  

• WVNA - Women Veterans Network Australia (Social Media Circulation 8,000+)  

• The Warriors Return (Social Media Circulation 17,000+)

Phase 3  

LAUNCH  

• Dandenong/Cranbourne RSL will provide the venue for the official launch of The 100.  

• Filming of the Launch to be streamed to other venues by invitation.  

• Key stakeholders and identified end-users including Creative Victoria, Department of Premier and Cabinet, Department of Education and Training Victoria, APPVA, RSL Victoria, Vietnam Veterans Association, Eastern Regional Libraries Corporation Victoria, City of Greater Dandenong, Yarra Ranges Council, City of Knox, project-partners, participants and select members of Community and Nation will be invited to participate at the launch.  

• Interviews to be conducted at the launch and preserved for posterity.  

• APPVA have suggested the timing of the launch to coincide with Remembrance Day.  

• City of Dandenong have offered the support of their media department and will provide a journalist to report on the day.  

• City of Knox have offered the support of their media department and will provide a journalist to report on the day. 

SUPPORT, MARKETING & DISTRIBUTION 

ACKNOWLEDGING STAKEHOLDERS 

APPVA 

V V A A 

W V N A 

City of Knox 

RSL Victoria 

Young Veterans 

Yarra Ranges Council 

City of Greater Dandenong 

Dandenong / Cranbourne RSL  

ARVN Rangers Association Victoria 

Department of Premier and Cabinet Victoria 

Department of Education and Training Victoria 

Interviews to be conducted with Key Stakeholders within Creative Victoria, Department of Premier and Cabinet, Department of Education and Training Victoria, APPVA, RSL Victoria, Vietnam Veterans Association, Eastern Regional Libraries Corporation Victoria, City of Greater Dandenong, Yarra Ranges Council, City of Knox, project-partners, participants and select members of Community and Nation to formally acknowledge their generosity and support. 

^The 100 Logo imagery used with kind permission Michael Quinn, Fiona Quinn and By The Left 

Risks and challenges

An Open Letter

Events, media exposés and exercises are shining nothing short of a Mil-Spec Battlefield Illuminator on a host of long simmering issues and challenges both confronting and confounding, you have surely heard the catchphrases, abbreviations and acronyms;

PTSD, DVA, RSL, FUBAR

The crosshairs are trained on the apparent failure of many aspects of our Veteran Support Network.

PTSD and Suicide, (relevant to not only Military Personnel, but also Emergency Services, The Police Service, Front Line Personnel, even the General Populace), are white-phosphorous hot topics. PTSD does not differentiate between combat witnessed from afar or experienced close quarter

Many suffered physical trauma on the battlefield. Some experienced no physical injuries but were traumatised through deployment into a controlled environment that rapidly spiraled out of control

A cursory look at a number of private and closed social media groups that I was granted access to, show a bewildering number of individuals who served, cooked, chooked, crumped and killed & returned only to feel abandoned and abused in a minefield of medical misinformation and a sea of red tape

The term “Last Post” has taken on a grisly new meaning

These topics do require constant and consistent discussion to be sure,

HOWEVER;

The producers and founders of The 100 are not aiming to enhance an already well-oiled media machine which is often focusing on the negative aspect of the topic at hand. Many sufferers of PTSD are, in the words of the aforementioned Advocate, “…high functioning, and in many cases, CEO’s of well-respected companies”. The stigma must be broken.

It is because of the stigma and fear to approach the “hard sell” of coupling “Achievement “ and “War” in a single sentence, that The 100 wants to be a standard bearer and shine a light and focus on those achievements, both during service and post, in civilian life. If it could be encapsulated in a single question, it may be;

"How has serving your country shaped who you are and how you have lived your life since?"

An Open Letter From Our Mentor

Date: 13th August 2018

Re: The 100

To whom it may concern,

I have been asked to review “The 100”, a documentary project by Films4Change. As a psychotherapist who specialises in treating acute and chronic trauma, anxiety disorders and PTSD, I was asked whether the content of the documentary would be likely to cause adverse reactions in war veterans, or trigger anxiety/PTSD symptoms. In short, my answer is categorically NO. In fact, it is likely to be beneficial to veterans who are suffering from anxiety, depression or PTSD. Let’s explore why……..

Trauma is a condition best defined as what happens to warm-blooded species when they are unable to respond in a stressful situation. When someone is unable to fight or flee, their system responds by going into the freeze response. While a few mammals have used this to their advantage, for most (including humans) this often has lasting adverse effects on their psychobiological functioning. At the moment when the trauma occurs, the old brain (survival brain) stores all the sensory, emotional and cognitive data. In the case of veterans who have potentially been exposed to multiple traumatic situations, the old brain stores and filters and files, drawing its own conclusions as to what stimuli are a sign of imminent danger.

These stimuli are what we call triggers, and when one of these stimuli is experienced by the person, their survival brain recognises it as one of the conditions that was present in the original traumatic event and assumes that the person is in danger again, so the system is triggered into high alert and the system is flooded with fight-flight chemicals. The person then experiences extreme anxiety (flight) or anger (fight), a traumatic flashback or a panic attack. The problem with the survival/old brain is that it is receiving data from the cortex (human/reasoning brain) second hand. It does not process visual, aural or sensory stimuli (those processing centres are contained in the cortex) and therefore has a primitive, hazy concept of reality. It is unable to distinguish between, for instance, a car backfiring and a gunshot, because it has no access to firsthand aural stimuli or reasoning and discernment. Given that it is the part of our brain that is responsible for ensuring survival, it errs on the side of caution.

The stimuli that trigger people who suffer from chronic or acute trauma are sensory. A fireman I treated for acute PTSD was triggered every time he saw the lights flashing on a firetruck or at the station (visual). A woman I treated for chronic trauma (childhood sexual abuse) was triggered if she heard floorboards creaking (“he’s coming”) or a door/gate click shut (“he’s home/here”). Her triggers were aural. I have treated people who were triggered by smells, tastes or sensations.

In addition to this, sufferers may be triggered by feeling states – a policeman I treated for PTSD was triggered by arguing with his wife. As soon as he experienced irritation (a sensation of tightness in his shoulders), it would trigger him into a rage state. A survivor of childhood physical and emotional abuse was triggered by fear – if his wife disagreed with even one thing that he said, he was gripped by debilitating fear (like a vice around his chest) which either drove him to collapse into tears or abuse her. Feelings are actually complex combinations of internal sensations which we learn to label as what we call emotions.

Having watched “The 100” there is not one interview in which anything that could trigger a trauma response is presented. There are no graphic verbal descriptions or visual depictions of traumatic events, no loud noises or sounds of war, and none of the people interviewed are experiencing trauma or are extremely emotionally heightened during the filming. War veterans suffering from PTSD are more likely to be triggered by the 6 o’clock news or a wide variety of prime time television shows.

In watching “The 100” myself, what I heard was that these people are expressing how service to their country has shaped their lives in profoundly positive ways. Rather than being likely to cause adverse responses in war veterans, I would be recommending that veterans who are sufferers of PTSD should watch this documentary.

Sufferers of PTSD do not have impaired reasoning, and seeing stories of people like themselves who are expressing the positive results they have experienced from being in service to their country is likely to encourage sufferers to think and question their own experience and draw positive inferences from it. This is something that will support them in their journey to recovery from PTSD.

Many sufferers come to have very negative feelings about their experience in the armed services, because of how intensely they are suffering in the present. Drawing them into re-remembering and exploring how their service has positively shaped who they are is a step to recreating balance in their lives.

In conclusion, far from recommending that it should not be shown, I would recommend that it should be actively distributed to services that are involved in the treatment of PTSD in armed services veterans.
Warm Regards,

Victoria Shaw
BA (Hons) Psych, Dip. Psychotherapy, ASIST accreditation (suicide counselling), Crisis counsellor accreditation, Dip. Life Coaching, Cert IV TAA, Generative Trance (postgrad), Imago Therapy (postgrad)

TOPICS AND RESEARCH

Responsible Reporting in the Media - A Mindframe Initiative

SANE is a national charity helping all Australians affected by mental illness. Guided by a vision in Australia to lead the world in mental health within ten years, their mission is to help all Australians affected by mental illness lead a better life.

SANE pursues its Mission through three key areas of activity to promote a better life for all Australians affected by mental illness: Support, Training, and Education. Assisting Media reporting in a responsible manner, they help people improve their lives and reduce the risk of suicide.

Funded under the Mindframe National Media Initiative, Mindframe for stage and screen is a partnership between the Hunter Institute of Mental Health, the Australian Writers’ Guild, SANE and a group of nine Australian scriptwriters. The Mindframe National Media Initiative recognises that all media have an important role to play in influencing social attitudes towards and perceptions of suicide and mental illness.

Film, television and theatre can exert a powerful influence on community attitudes towards mental illness and suicide. In March 2007, a workshop brought together Australian scriptwriters with people directly affected by mental illness and those working in mental health. This established the need for resources that would enhance the development of more truthful and authentic portrayals of mental health issues rather than portrayals that perpetuate current myths and stereotypes.

• When suicide is incorporated into a story on stage or screen, that it reinforces the attitude that there are alternatives to suicide and that help is available;

• Depictions of mental illness are based on accurate information, challenge stereotypes and myths about mental illness and encourage people with mental health problems to seek help;

• People involved in the development of film, television and theatre understand the impact of portraying suicide and mental illness on stage and screen, based on evidence from up-to-date research;

• Research on suicide and mental illness and reliable sources of information are available to scriptwriters when preparing a piece;

An electronic copy of the full resource book, Mental Illness and Suicide: A Mindframe resource for Stage and Screen can be downloaded at;

www.mindframe-media.info/__data/assets/pdf_file/0014/6017/Stage-and-Screen-Resource-Book.pdf

Along with quick reference resources at;

http://www.mindframe-media.info/for-media

TOPICS AND RESEARCH

Issues to Consider

Nearly half (45%) of the Australian population between the age of 16 and 85 years will experience a mental disorder at some time throughout their life. During any given 12-month period, one in five people will be actively experiencing symptoms of a mental disorder and many more people will be affected indirectly as they provide loved ones such as family, friends and/or work colleagues support throughout that experience.

As Storytellers, our audience will include people directly affected by mental illness, as well as people who have limited knowledge of mental illness. When developing a storyline that might include mental illness, we have asked ourselves…

• Why are we introducing mental illness into the story?

• Will our portrayal be fresh and original?

• Are we perpetuating stereotypes?

• Will our portrayal of mental illness be truthful?

• What language will our characters use?

• Can we improve the accuracy and authenticity of our portrayal?

• Can the storyline have a positive effect on the audience?

As Film Makers we will keep these questions front of mind and to ensure we are responsibly reporting the outcomes, the support of Mindframe will be invaluable as they have offered to check the film before the final edit is released.
A warning message will be included at the beginning of the film to alert vulnerable audiences of any ‘triggering’ content. Also a Helpline will be displayed at the end of the film (relevant to veterans)

Veterans Support Service
Veterans and Veterans Families Counselling Service
1800 011 046
www.vvcs.gov.au

TOPICS AND RESEARCH

Australian Veterans and Peacekeepers

Since Federation, approximately 1.4 million Australian men and women have served with Australian military forces in wars and peacekeeping operations. Amongst those alive today, the majority are males aged 60 years and over. World War II veterans are the largest group (around 77,400), followed by Vietnam veterans (around 47,000) and approximately 14,700 veterans of the Korean War, Malayan Emergency, Indonesian Confrontation and other operations in Southeast Asia.

The 1990s saw the Australian Defense Force engaged in a new wave of overseas deployments, with approximately 1200 personnel serving in the First Gulf War and an estimated 5000 engaged in peacekeeping operations in places such as Cambodia, Somalia and Rwanda. Since 1999, it is estimated that a further 45,000 ADF personnel have served in peacekeeping operations and in areas of conflict, including East Timor, Afghanistan and Iraq.

Experience

For many veterans, military service and operational deployment leads to a strong sense of identity and belonging.

A veteran’s military experiences may have taken place many years in the past or more recently, and they may have been deployed to different types of operations. Some ex-ADF members may not have participated in deployment that involved war or peacekeeping duties but may have nonetheless been deeply affected by experiences such as humanitarian deployments.

Military training promotes strict conformity to high standards of behaviour in terms of discipline, punctuality, orderliness, cleanliness, obedience and attention to detail. Lives may depend on these behaviours in the face of a military threat.

Beyond military culture and training, many veterans have had experiences in the course of service which have led them to think of themselves as fundamentally different to civilians. Many of these experiences relate to their exposure to people’s capacity to behave inhumanely towards others. In war, service people are required to overcome their natural reluctance to kill another human being, which requires, amongst other things, learning to ‘dehumanise the enemy’.

Many peacekeepers struggle within themselves to reconcile this with their personal values and beliefs, and feel that they have been changed as a result. They have the training to intervene, but often they do not have the authority. This is often described as a ‘loss of innocence’.

“Analyse”

TOPICS AND RESEARCH

Entitlement

Service people deployed overseas in war zones or peacekeeping missions are required to ‘put their lives on the line’ for their country. While this is accepted as part of the job, it can become a source of bitterness and resentment for veterans who feel that the public or government have not appreciated their loss, or the loss of their mates, which can lead to another form of trauma or PTSD in “Survivor Guilt”.
Many veterans feel let down by the government and society for whom they were prepared to die, when they are left with mental health problems following their service and feel that they have to fight for recognition. While they may indeed be entitled to care as defined in legislation, eligibility needs to be established in each case. Some veterans may have a low tolerance for the process of establishing entitlement.

Community Attitudes

The experience of Vietnam veterans highlights the difficulties caused by public opposition to a conflict. The experience of many Vietnam veterans was that instead of being welcomed home as heroes, they were confronted with moratoriums, ostracised by their peers, and vilified as ‘baby killers’.

Many speak of leaving a war zone only to be confronted by another ‘enemy at home’. While there were many locally organised welcome home parades for Vietnam veterans, there was no official national welcome home parade until 1987, almost 15 years after the war in Vietnam had ended. For many Vietnam veterans, this was a devastating experience, which reinforced their perception that there was a clear divide between ‘them’ (civilians) and ‘us’ (veterans) and the associated mistrust of those outside the group. Some Vietnam veterans do not, even now, disclose their service to others, for fear of negative judgment.

This feeling of being “left out” is not unique to the Vietnam Veteran; ex-Service Personnel will report that not only can this feeling permeate from within the Community, but also from within the Service itself.
We must accept the disconnect that occurs when an individual, elite in their training and focus, returns from Service only to find difficulty in transitioning those skills to a Civilian existence.

Disconnect. How?

Well consider this; Diesel mechanics are in high demand, snipers are not.

“Address”

TOPICS AND RESEARCH

What is PTSD?

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a condition that can develop in response to single or repeated exposure to traumatic events.
A number of events have the potential to cause PTSD, including: threat of death; serious injury; viewing or handling human remains; seeing someone badly injured or killed; interpersonal violence, being unable to respond to a threatening situation; and witnessing human suffering on a large scale.

It is normal to experience some form of distress after traumatic events. Some people may recover without professional assistance and get back to their normal lives with the support of family and friends. For others, the distressing symptoms do not subside and can intensify to the point that normal functioning at work and in their private lives is severely affected. Generally, these people will need specialised professional assistance to recover their normal functioning, but most will eventually go on to lead normal, productive and satisfying lives.

PTSD is a treatable condition.

What causes PTSD in Veterans and Peacekeepers?

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), sometimes known as shell shock or combat stress, occurs after you experience severe trauma or a life-threatening event. It’s normal for your mind and body to be in shock after such an event, but this normal response becomes PTSD when your nervous system gets “stuck.”

Your nervous system has two automatic or reflexive ways of responding to stressful events;
Mobilization, or fight-or-flight, occurs when you need to defend yourself or survive the danger of a combat situation. Your heart pounds faster, your blood pressure rises, and your muscles tighten, increasing your strength and reaction speed. Once the danger has passed, your nervous system calms your body, lowering your heart rate and blood pressure, and winding back down to its normal balance.
Immobilization occurs when you’ve experienced too much stress in a situation and even though the danger has passed, you find yourself “stuck.” Your nervous system is unable to return to its normal state of balance and you’re unable to move on from the event.

This is PTSD.

“Understand”

TOPICS AND RESEARCH

Symptoms of PTSD in Veterans and Peacekeepers.

While you can develop symptoms of PTSD in the hours or days following a traumatic event, sometimes symptoms don’t surface for months or even years after you return from deployment. While PTSD develops differently from veteran to veteran, there are four symptom clusters;

1. Recurrent, intrusive reminders of the traumatic event, including distressing thoughts, nightmares, and flashbacks where you feel like the event is happening again. Experiencing extreme emotional and physical reactions to reminders of the trauma such as panic attacks, uncontrollable shaking, and heart palpitations;

2. Extreme avoidance of things that remind you of the traumatic event, including people, places, thoughts, or situations you associate with the bad memories. Withdrawing from friends and family and losing interest in everyday activities;

3. Negative changes in your thoughts and mood, such as exaggerated negative beliefs about yourself or the world and persistent feelings of fear, guilt, or shame. Diminished ability to experience positive emotions;

4. Being on guard all the time, jumpy, and emotionally reactive, as indicated by irritability, anger, reckless behavior, difficulty sleeping, trouble concentrating, and hypervigilance;

5. Chronic Pain can be the same as PTSD.

What do we know about PTSD in the ADF?

All Australians, including ADF members, have the potential to be exposed to traumas that may contribute to the development of PTSD. However the rates of both military and non-military related traumas are higher in the ADF than in the Australian community.

Studies also indicate that ADF members who have never deployed, experience PTSD at the same rate as those who have deployed, and that length of deployment is not a useful marker of risk for PTSD.
However, the number and type of traumas as well as roles on deployment, such as combat or explosive ordinance roles, may assist to identify those most at risk. Those who experience multiple traumas across their lifetime, including on deployment;
are at greater risk of PTSD.

“Accept”

MECHANICS OF
THE INTERVIEW PROCESS

Safety Plan

Interview Format - Screening Individuals

Advocates Michael Quinn and John McNeill will identify the “mind set” of individuals with an informal “pre-screening” conversation, preferably face to face, in line with APPVA Advocate policy and procedures used in assisting Veterans with many topics ranging from (but not limited to), Welfare, Health, State of Mind, Finances, Family, Department of Veterans’ Affairs Claims e.g. TPI, Comsuper, also giving the individual the opportunity to preview the questions.
Hence these conversations, are analysed by observation and/or listening to responses to gauge a “state of mind”.

Vocal responses may be (but not limited to) Speech, Conversation, Cadence e.g.
• Stop/Start;
• Flowing;
• Confrontational;
• Submissive;
• Agitated;
• Avoiding;
• Exaggeration of Circumstances/Experiences;
• Conflicted Memories;

Physical responses to certain questions may be (but not limited to);
• Sweating;
• Shaking;
• Fidgeting;
• Staring;
• Avoiding eye contact;
• “Glassy Eyes” indicating the mind is wandering;
• Exaggerated Stillness;

“Enquire”

MECHANICS OF
THE INTERVIEW PROCESS

Safety Plan

Interview Format - Managing Individuals

Advocates Michael Quinn and John McNeill understand that the provision of a safe, non-judgmental environment, is paramount to the comfort and safety of an individual, hence the individual will be given the opportunity to dictate their comfort level and “control the environment”
These actions may be (but not limited to);

• Individual “reconnoiters” the environment;
• Individual chooses their physical position within the confines of the room;
• Minimisation Techniques e.g. avoiding loud noises, phone calls, stressor questions;
• Avoiding the Quick Anger Scenario e.g. avoiding loaded questions, facilitating travel to avoid heavy traffic.

Advocates Michael Quinn and John McNeill are trained to observe and interpret the signs that an individual may exhibit while entering a state of distress or discomfort
In the event of escalation signs may range from (but not be limited to);

• Semi or completely guarded responses;
• Semi or complete avoidance of the Question or Topic;
• Voice patterns escalating in volume or pitch;
• Pupils becoming dilated;
• Skin becoming flushed;
• Individual standing abruptly from a seated position;
• Individual suddenly becoming quiet and unresponsive;
• Individual body movements becoming exaggerated;
• Individual opening their mouth in an exaggerated manner;
• Individual focusing on their own opinion;
• Individual becoming confrontational or aggressive (passively or overtly).

“Explore”

MECHANICS OF
THE INTERVIEW PROCESS

EMERGENCY Management Procedure

Interview Format – Assisting Individuals

Advocates Michael Quinn and John McNeill are trained to “de-escalate the environment” in the unlikely event of an Intervention. Their approach is measured and empathetic;

• Stop Talking;
• Ask if the individual would like to “stand down”;
• Clear the room of occupants at the individuals discretion;
• Facilitate the individuals exit;
• Be present as the individual “vents” or “winds down”;
• Provide the opportunity to recommence, defer or cancel entirely;
• Follow up.

In the event a de-escalation is not possible

• Call 000;
• Alert Venue Security;
• Follow up.

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