Share this project

Done

Share this project

Done
Claustrophobia 1643 is an updated, improved reissue of the classic Claustrophobia, a survival boardgame published 9 years ago.
Claustrophobia 1643 is an updated, improved reissue of the classic Claustrophobia, a survival boardgame published 9 years ago.
7,712 backers pledged $757,459 to help bring this project to life.

An Interview with Artist David Demaret

Posted by Monolith Board Games LLC (Creator)
66 likes

Faithful pledgers,

The new edition of Claustrophobia’s stunning game board tiles were illustrated by French artist David Demerit.

As with Pascal Quidault, we chose David Demaret to work on Claustrophobia 1643 after collaborating with him on previous projects.

He has dedicated himself to breathing illustrative life into the hellish tunnels of New Jerusalem. - whether Human or Infernal I swear you can hear them breathing.

He tells us about his career and his contribution to Claustrophobia 1643.

How would you describe your career as an illustrator?

I started my career in video games very early (Amiga and Atari ST). First in 2D with Deluxe Paint (in pixel art) and then with Photoshop on PC, to finish with 3D on 3DSMAX, mostly on characters, weapons, objects and monsters in real time 3D.

I had the chance to work on hits like Duke Nukem 3D or Driver, for which I had to expatriate myself in the United States and in England. I came back to France to work on Alone in The Dark (Dreamcast and Playstation) and many other projects after that. I learned everything on the job, everything was to be invented and there were no schools at that time. I had to constantly adapt to new techniques.

Despite my "success" in 3D, my long buried true passion, that was illustration, came back to life. Fed up with 3D, fed up with video games! Frazetta (for the heroic-fantasy side) and Chris Foss as well as Moebius (for SF) really made me dream forever. This explains why I am passionate about illustrating both without really being able to choose. The fact that we can work from home with Photoshop and a tablet using the same techniques as traditional art and without heavy equipment (oil, airbrush ...) have made me finally get into it. Anyways, I had seen most everything in the video game industry and I thought that this world had changed too much compared to small teams and fun I had learned to expect. I therefore launched myself in this new challenge with the help of former colleagues who had also taken the leap before me. I therefore had to learn everything from scratch again and work on improving slowly, image by image. It is an exciting job, but very hard and very demanding. It requires a lot of sacrifice (I thank my wife about it ;)).

Above all, you have to be patient and persevering to be able to "break through" and make a living out of it! But what a joy it is to be able to create works that were first imagined and that can take form on the screen! And if we can also make people dream with our vision, it's really satisfying. To summarize, we can say that I've given my most ferocious self in it, and in the end if we want it badly enough, we can!

How do you work? What is your creative process?

I work exclusively with Photoshop (CC2018) and with a Wacom Pro graphics tablet. I also use a Pro Pen (Wacom), which is still stronger than the basic stylus! I am exclusively a PC guy . For the process itself: I learn a lot when I know the project I'm working on, I gather a lot of docs (photos). I think a lot about what I will be able to paint before "attacking". Then comes the phase of graphic research, sketches and adjustments following client feedback. The inspiration comes to me in the middle of the night, my Muse not coming to visit me during the day!

How did you come to illustrate Claustrophobia 1643? And what is your relationship with Monolith?

It’s mostly about friendly relationships. It all started with the trust placed in me by Fred Henry (whom I still thank), to whom I had sent my images of SF without really believing it, having suffered many refusals before. He immediately gave me an appointment and I was able to start working on Mythic Battles: Pantheon: a huge chance! However, I had to prove myself to convince the rest of the team. I had to raise my level like a sportsman transcended by the event 😉 in order to be able to approach that of the other fantastic illustrators of this project. Then, thanks to the trust of Erwan Hascoët, I was working again, but on Batman: Gotham City Chronicles this time, and on the tiles (a new field for me). I helped Georges Cl4renko on this huge task and he helped me get started. I then continued naturally with the tiles for Claustrophobia 1643, solo this time.

First version of the "healing fountain" tile. Judged too heroic-fantasy and not dark enough.
First version of the "healing fountain" tile. Judged too heroic-fantasy and not dark enough.

Illustrating a reissue is different from illustrating a new project. How did you go about that?

First, we must recognize the high quality of the old tiles of the initial game. Then I told myself that we had to do better and that it would not be easy at all! A real challenge, in short. Moreover, they are not simple illustrations of atmosphere, but real mini-universes in each tile with an effect on the gameplay that I had to represent there. There was therefore a huge pressure to give a new look and have the new graphic universe be accepted by the first edition players, as well as to engage newcomers.

After a phase of graphic research, the final representation of the underground of Claustrophobia 1643 began to take place. The final look emerged and began to consolidate more and more with each new tile. I learned to know and give life to this universe. The hard part was ultimately to make corridors interesting and beautiful to look at, to mix the danger with a certain beauty, to have diversity with a graphic unit, varied but coherent. It took several months of hard work to carry out this project. I must say that I am very proud of the result, especially given the feedback. I like to think that people will admire them and immerse themselves in the universe when they play the game, and in the end it will be more than an illustration.

Reference prototype of the graphic look of the new Claustrophobia 1643 tiles. The light is good but the walls must still be defined and separated from playable areas of the ground.
Reference prototype of the graphic look of the new Claustrophobia 1643 tiles. The light is good but the walls must still be defined and separated from playable areas of the ground.

Which of your Claustrophobia 1643 illustrations are you most proud of?

For this game, it's the T-rex (little nod to Erwan Hascoët). This is one of the tiles that asked me the most work and in the end makes it really good and shows the danger of these tunnels. I then have a weakness for the well of the underworld, the mushrooms, the mist, the tomb and the hole in the troglodyte soil.

Are you planning on playing it?

Of course, I can’t wait! I am a game fan .

Old "phosphorescent mushrooms" tile. The hole on the right could have suggested that there was an exit or a troglodyte exit. It had to be reworked.
Old "phosphorescent mushrooms" tile. The hole on the right could have suggested that there was an exit or a troglodyte exit. It had to be reworked.
Final phosphorescent mushrooms tile.
Final phosphorescent mushrooms tile.

Thanks for the interview David . You can more of Davids’ art at https://www.facebook.com/DavidDemaretofficial/.

Très chers pledgers, 

Les tuiles de la nouvelle édition de Claustrophobia 1643 ont été illustrées par l’artiste David Demaret. Tout comme ça avait été le cas pour Pascal Quidault, nous avons choisi de solliciter David Demaret après avoir collaboré avec lui sur de précédents projets. Il s’est ici consacré à l’illustration des tuiles que foulent humains et démons dans les sous-sols de la Nouvelle Jérusalem. Il nous parle de son parcours et de sa contribution à Claustrophobia 1643

Quel est ton parcours d’illustrateur ? 

J’ai commencé ma carrière dans le jeu vidéo et ceci très tôt (Amiga et Atari ST). D’abord en 2D avec Deluxe Paint (en pixel art) et ensuite avec Photoshop sur PC, pour finir à la 3D avec 3DSMAX essentiellement sur des personnages, armes, objets et monstres en 3D temps réel.
J’ai eu la chance de travailler sur des hits comme Duke Nukem 3D ou Driver, pour lesquels j’ai dû m’expatrier aux Etats-Unis et en Angleterre.
Je suis revenu en France pour travailler sur Alone in The Dark (Dreamcast et Playstation) et bien d’autres projets par la suite. J’ai tout appris sur le tas, tout était à inventer et il n’y avait pas d’écoles à cette époque. Il a fallu sans cesse s’adapter à de nouvelles techniques.
Malgré mes « succès » dans la 3D, ma véritable passion longtemps enfouie qu’était l’illustration se réveilla. Marre de la 3D, marre des jeux vidéo !
Frazetta (pour le coté heroic-fantasy) et Chris Foss ainsi que Moebius (pour la SF) me faisaient vraiment rêver depuis toujours. Ceci explique pourquoi je me passionne à illustrer les deux domaines sans pouvoir vraiment choisir.
Le fait qu’on puisse travailler depuis chez soi avec Photoshop et une tablette en utilisant les mêmes techniques que l’art traditionnel et sans matériel lourd (huile, aérographe...) ont fait que je me suis enfin lancé. De toute façon, j’avais fait le tour de l’industrie du jeu vidéo et je pensais que ce monde avait trop changé par rapport aux petites équipes et « cingleries » des débuts.
Je me suis donc lancé corps et âme dans ce nouveau défi et ce avec l’aide d’anciens collègues qui avaient eux aussi franchi le pas avant moi. Il a donc fallu tout réapprendre à la base et travailler à s’améliorer lentement, image après image.
C’est un métier passionnant, mais très dur et très exigeant. Il demande énormément de sacrifices (je remercie ma femme à ce sujet ;)).
Il faut savoir avant tout être patient et être persévérant pour pouvoir « percer » et en vivre !
Mais quelle joie de pouvoir créer des œuvres qu’on a d’abord imaginées et qui puissent se concrétiser sur l’écran !
Et si en plus on peut faire rêver des gens avec notre vision, c’est vraiment satisfaisant.
Pour résumer, on peut dire que j’ai bouffé pas mal de vache enragée et qu’au final si on veut, on peut ! 

Comment travailles-tu ? Quel est ton processus créatif ? 

Je travaille exclusivement avec Photoshop (CC2018) et avec une tablette graphique Wacom Pro. J’utilise aussi un stylet Pro Pen (Wacom), qui est quand même plus solide que le stylet de base ! je suis exclusivement PC :).
Pour le processus proprement dit : je me renseigne énormément quand je connais le projet sur lequel je travaille, je rassemble beaucoup de docs (photos).
Je réfléchis énormément à ce que je vais pouvoir peindre avant « d’attaquer ». Ensuite vient la phase de recherche graphique, sketchs et ajustements suivant les différents retours. L’inspiration me vient au cœur de la nuit, ma Muse ne venant pas me visiter le jour ! 

Comment en es-tu venu à illustrer les tuiles Claustrophobia 1643 ? Et quel est ton lien avec Monolith ? 

Ce sont avant tout des liens amicaux. Tout est parti de la confiance qu’a placé en moi Fred Henry (que je remercie encore), à qui j’avais envoyé mes images de SF sans trop y croire, ayant essuyé de nombreux refus auparavant. Il m’a immédiatement donné rendez-vous et j’ai ainsi pu commencer à travailler sur « Mythic Battles Panthéon » : une chance énorme !
J’ai cependant dû faire mes preuves pour convaincre le reste de l’équipe. J’ai dû hausser mon niveau tel un sportif transcendé par l’évènement 😉 afin de pouvoir approcher celui des autres fantastiques illustrateurs de ce projet. Ensuite, grâce à la confiance d’Erwan Hascoët, j’ai remis ça sur Batman : Gotham City Chronicles cette fois-ci sur les tuiles (un domaine nouveau pour moi). J’ai épaulé Georges Cl4renko sur cette énorme tache et il m’a d’ailleurs bien aidé à me lancer.
J’ai ensuite enchaîné tout naturellement sur les tuiles de Claustrophobia 1643, en solo cette fois-ci.

Première version de la tuile « fontaine de guérison ». Jugée trop heroic-fantasy et pas assez dark.
Première version de la tuile « fontaine de guérison ». Jugée trop heroic-fantasy et pas assez dark.

Illustrer une réédition est différent de l'illustration d'un nouveau projet. Comment ça s'est passé pour toi de ce côté-là ? 

Tout d’abord, il faut reconnaître la grande qualité des anciennes tuiles du jeu initial. Ensuite, je me suis dit qu’il allait falloir faire mieux et que ça ne serait pas facile du tout ! Un véritable challenge, en somme.
De plus ce ne sont pas de simples illustrations d’ambiance, mais de vrais mini-univers par tuile avec un effet sur le gameplay qu’il fallait y représenter. Il y avait donc une énorme pression pour donner un nouveau look et faire accepter le nouvel univers graphique par les anciens joueurs et par la même séduire les nouveaux venus.
Après une phase de recherche graphique, la représentation finale des sous-sols de Claustrophobia 1643 a commencé à se mettre en place. Le look final a émergé et commencé à se consolider toujours plus à chaque nouvelle tuile. J’apprenais moi-même à mieux connaître et donner vie à cet univers.
Le plus dur était au final de rendre des couloirs intéressants et beau à regarder, mélanger le danger à une certaine beauté, avoir de la diversité avec une unité graphique, variée mais cohérente.
C’est en tout plusieurs mois de travail acharné pour mener à bien ce projet. Je dois dire que je ne suis pas peu fier du résultat, surtout au vu des retours. J’aime penser que les gens vont les admirer et s’immerger dans l’univers quand ils joueront au jeu, et qu’au final ce sera plus qu’une illustration. 

Prototype de référence du look graphique des nouvelles tuiles Claustrophobia 1643. La lumière est bonne mais il reste encore à mieux définir les murs et les séparer des zones jouables du sol.
Prototype de référence du look graphique des nouvelles tuiles Claustrophobia 1643. La lumière est bonne mais il reste encore à mieux définir les murs et les séparer des zones jouables du sol.

Parmi toutes tes illustrations pour Claustrophobia 1643, de laquelle es-tu le plus fier ?

Pour ce jeu, c’est le T-Rex (petit clin d’œil à Erwan Hascoët). C’est une des tuiles qui m’a demandé le plus de travail et au final rend vraiment bien et montre bien le danger de ces souterrains.
J’ai ensuite un faible pour le puits des enfers, les champignons, la brume, le tombeau et le trou dans le sol des troglodytes. 

As-tu prévu d'y jouer ? 

Bien sûr, j’ai même hâte ! je suis joueur à la base :). 

Ancienne tuile « Champignons phosphorescents ». Le trou à droite aurait pu faire penser qu’il y a une issue ou une sortie de troglodytes. Elle a donc du être refaite.
Ancienne tuile « Champignons phosphorescents ». Le trou à droite aurait pu faire penser qu’il y a une issue ou une sortie de troglodytes. Elle a donc du être refaite.
Tuile finale des champignons luminescents
Tuile finale des champignons luminescents

Merci à David de s’être prêté au jeu de l’interview. Vous pouvez le retrouver sur https://www.facebook.com/DavidDemaretofficial/

L'équipe Monolith

MisterShamWOW, Rob, and 64 more people like this update.

Comments

Only backers can post comments. Log In
    1. John Angelo on

      The inclusion of steps on some of the tiles is a very nice touch, too! Beautiful work all around

    2. John Angelo on

      Sorry, not the tail. The hip section of the T.Rex skeleton makes it appear as if the path is blocked. It's NOT blocked, correct?

    3. John Angelo on

      The T-Rex tile is my favorite, too, but I'm surprised it's left as is. The tail makes the path connection looked blocked. Is it blocked ?

    4. Jimmy Trinket
      Superbacker
      on

      I can understand why his favourite is the T-Rex, I think it is also my favourite. And a shame he had to rework the old mushroom tile, as I really like the original tile before it was reworked.

    5. Eric Chénard
      Superbacker
      on

      Vraiment de haute qualité!

    6. Djinn on

      Magnifique travail. Hâte de suer sang et eau dessus.

    7. Missing avatar

      Marco Herreras
      Superbacker
      on

      The art is Gorgeous, I can't wait to play this!
      This actu should be showcased ad nauseam in all forums

    8. Laurent RUFFIE on

      Congratulation to David Demaret.
      The illustrations are marvelous and the ambiance is well translated: oppressing but still with a certain beauty.

    9. Fabian Roth
      Superbacker
      on

      Fantastic tiles - a great improvement while staying true to the old ones. This is a part of the second edition I really like.

    10. Missing avatar

      Halcon on

      I really enjoy these updates and getting to know more about the artists involved. The art in this game is just so amazing. I can't wait to play !!

    11. Missing avatar

      Manuel Gracia on

      awesome insight from a 3D artist turned illustrator.

    12. Missing avatar

      Dael Alonso
      Superbacker
      on

      Amazing Art. Thank you