Share this project

Done

Share this project

Done
Who pushed Humpty Dumpty? Find out in this Dragnet-inspired police procedural that will entertain children and adults alike.
145 backers pledged $9,603 to help bring this project to life.

BEHIND THE SCENES True Crimes From Rhymes Square Pt. 4 - Rough Sketching the Whole Book

Posted by Andy Heidel (Creator)
4 likes

Now that we had all the characters under out belt, and a fair degree of the visual style of the book, the next step was to go through every book spread and provide sketch ideas. We had a few images that we had a pretty fair idea what we wanted the sketch to be, but for the majority of the book, the art direction committee--Andy Heidel (writer/producer), Elizabeth Daggar (Graphic Designer for the book, video, and promotional resources), and I--decided to have me whip up with about four variations for each spread image. We wanted a lot of ideas to look at in order to pick the right images for each.

So with the text laid out in the book format, the spaces for the illustrations assigned, and all of Andy's and Liz's preliminary visual notes and ideas in hand, I spent 6-plus weeks filling a sketchbook and a half worth of sketch variations for the vast majority of the book (with at least one rough for a few, but usually four for 85% of the images). So I played around with options that changed the camera view of the image, the character focus,and which part of the story in the related text to pull from. I also did some straight storytelling images along with some more conceptional-driven images as alternatives.

We met biweekly, picking our favorite--or favorites--and debating which was stronger and why. Liz would place our choices in the book template so we would see how each spread flowed into the next, careful of the potential repetitiveness of images following each other. We were also mindful of the "we've already done this" situation too. We crafted spot illustrations to fill in on spreads where the text did not fill out the leading side enough.

And later on, if we really liked an image but it was not relating to the text enough, either Andy would rewrite the text to fit or I would redraft the image to better compliment the text. It was a very exciting time of idea developing or redeveloping.

Below, as an example, are the four concept sketches for the Baa Baa illustration. I played a bit with active and passive images, character focus, and so on.

Variation 1: Somewhat active, but September could be better.
Variation 1: Somewhat active, but September could be better.

 

Variation 2: All characters passive. Again, September gets a back seat (which was already happening in the book to much). More focus on the bike than the horse.
Variation 2: All characters passive. Again, September gets a back seat (which was already happening in the book to much). More focus on the bike than the horse.

 

Variation 3: Full on steampunk noir bike. Great shot of Baa Baa. Good showing the badassery of Friday. But now September is bumped out all together.
Variation 3: Full on steampunk noir bike. Great shot of Baa Baa. Good showing the badassery of Friday. But now September is bumped out all together.

 

Variation 4: And here we got it. Everyone moving and setting up the tone of the text. Not Friday AND September get to be badasses.
Variation 4: And here we got it. Everyone moving and setting up the tone of the text. Not Friday AND September get to be badasses.

Below is the final sketch, which will be in the book. We added the Shoe Building in the final (vs the rough sketch) as it was soon to be visited by Friday and September in the story for another witness statement. By adding this element, it sets up an upcoming scene, which is just better storytelling.

Finished Sketch: And here's the image with more of a polish as the finals sketch. And adding the Shoe building to set up upcoming scenes.
Finished Sketch: And here's the image with more of a polish as the finals sketch. And adding the Shoe building to set up upcoming scenes.

After all of the rough sketching was complete, I could now produce some final sketches and some final paintings for the pitch and the Collector's Edition--which would showcase our pitch art in a complete book with the various stages of art from rough images to final paintings. More on that in Pt. 5.

Andy Heidel, Kati, and 2 more people like this update.

Comments

Only backers can post comments. Log In