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A documentary film about the Kilogram and the scientific efforts to redefine it.
A documentary film about the Kilogram and the scientific efforts to redefine it.
174 backers pledged $27,038 to help bring this project to life.

Checking facts: How much does a fingerprint weigh? Enough to concern mass metrologists and museum curators.

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Update, updated references, and guest blog post!

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Update, blog post about Colonial weights and measures

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Update and some information about a forthcoming book

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Research highlights in public understanding of metrication (which is more photogenic than it sounds)

Dear Friends,

As one of my aims for the State of the Unit is to help the general public understand what the redefinition of the kilogram will mean (and how it came about), I am naturally interested in examples of public instruction on measurement. There is quite a precedent in the history of the kilogram. Michael Trott, the film's science advisor, has bought some books—very, very old books, i.e., 1790s—that teach the newly invented and launched metric system to the general public of France. 

On the film's blog, I have put together some thoughts about the public instruction one can glean from these books and from the demands for standardized weights and measures published the summer before the French Revolution: "Metrication in 1790s France: When people got what they asked for, but not what they wanted

Even today, a little pocket ruler matches the standard published in Year III, or what you would call 1795.
Even today, a little pocket ruler matches the standard published in Year III, or what you would call 1795.

Things are going well for me and this project, and I hope you enjoy the blog post. Scroll down for many pictures of the books! :D

Sincerely,

Amy