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Tailored & cut fabric packs to sew your own medieval/LARP clothing
69 backers pledged €11,768 to help bring this project to life.

It's 13th century time

Posted by Dennis vdM (Creator)

The thirteenth century... What can we say about it? As a hardcore 15th century re-enactor, focussed on the Burgundian court, it was hard to accept that 13th century fashion was so... Uncomplicated. It sure did make a great start for sewing my first Royal Needle pack!

Karo and I decided that the absolute must-have basic outfit for 13th century contains:

  • linen shirt
  • linen coif
  • linen bruchen/shorts
  • woolen beinlingen/hosen
  • linen cotte
  • woolen surcotte

Since we already have the undergarments in this Kickstarter, all we needed are the cotte and surcotte.

The cotte was basically a long version of the tunic. It is recommended to wear in combination with a linen shirt, a 13th century woolen surcotte (see below) and a belt.

The 13th century surcotte is a very interesting garment in itself. This garment evolved from the cyclas, which front and back were joined only at the shoulders, and had no sleeves.

When the sides are closed and sleeves are added, it becomes a surcotte. If desired, the front and back can be slit open at the lower seam to allow more space for movement, and to tuck in the corner into your belt.

You may keep the arm pits open, or slice the arms open in the length direction of the sleeve about the height of the elbow, to turn it into a gardecorps - another overgarment of the 13th century.

So with this fabric pack, you have the choice to make three different models!

Yesterday I sewed the cotte and surcotte, which was an easy job:

1. Lock the fabric around the edges

2. Sew the two back parts together

3. Sew the front and back together at the shoulders

4. Sew the sleeve in the body at the shoulder side

5. Sew the sleeve shut along the length of the sleeve

6. Sew in the gussets in the armholes

7. Sew the gores in the sides

8. Sew the sides of the body closed

9. Sew in the lining of the neckline

10. Tunnel the edges at the lower edge and the wrists

And so it was that in 10 steps I had the cotte finished. To sew the surcotte, you follow the exact same 10 steps. Every seam, except for the neck line, is a straight line. Seeing that even I was able to finish the project, I declare it fool-proof!

Below you find pictures of the results. Obviously, I only realized that I could have been the model myself if only I used the timer function of the camera... Oh well. The mannequin and I have nearly the same measurements anyway.

Cotte

The neck can be closed with a nice 13th century brooch.
The neck can be closed with a nice 13th century brooch.
Tunnels at the edges give a neat finish.
Tunnels at the edges give a neat finish.

Surcotte

The gores (large fabric triangles at the bottom) improve movability.
The gores (large fabric triangles at the bottom) improve movability.
A spaceous garment, lots of comfort inside!
A spaceous garment, lots of comfort inside!
The deep neck opening provides ventilation, vital for manly chest hair.
The deep neck opening provides ventilation, vital for manly chest hair.
Add nice accessories to complete your look: belt, hat, jewellery, a hood...
Add nice accessories to complete your look: belt, hat, jewellery, a hood...

Available now

The cotte and surcotte are now available as reward packs in the Kickstarter. The following prices apply:

Additionally, we created a 13th century pack deal. This pack contains one linen shirt, linen shorts, linen cotte, woolen surcotte, and a pair of woolen hosen. It comes at the great price of €149... A total bargain, just for this Kickstarter.

We hope you like it! 

Cheers,

Dennis

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