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Funding for this project was canceled by the project creator on Mar 25 2013
Joseph YbarraBy Joseph Ybarra
First created
Joseph YbarraBy Joseph Ybarra
First created
$27,460
pledged of $700,000pledged of $700,000 goal
808
backers
0seconds to go
Funding Canceled
Funding for this project was canceled by the project creator on Mar 25 2013

Stage Two at a Glance

Posted by Joseph Ybarra (Creator)

Howdy folks! Jo Shindler here to tell you more about the game play of Shackleton Crater. If you've been following these updates or reading our website you know about stage one already, as well as our strategy for why we are building the game this way. Although early colonization efforts will be mainly focused on becoming self-sustaining, second stage colonies will be able to shift their attention to growth. This growth is extremely expensive to undertake but represents the second step of progress for any lunar colony. This is why self sustenance is important for lunar colonies. 

As an example, building a factory on the Moon is cost-prohibitive if you have to ship all your materials in from Earth. It's in every colonist's best interest to meet their own needs - although the type of colony you build determines very much how you develop your growth. In the world of Shackleton Crater, there are four types of colonies, each corresponding with the four core resources. These colony types are classifications of convenience as opposed to choice - players are free to focus their colony's efforts as they see fit, or build more than one!

  • Industrial - these practical colonies focus on generating material. Industrial colonies are good because you can easily expand your colony while shipping valuable resources back to Earth. 
  • Research - these useful colonies focus on observation of and experimentation with the Moon. Research colonies are good because you can easily discover new technologies that reduce the cost of lunar living. 
  • Support - these strategic colonies focus on generating heaps of power for other colonies. Support colonies are good because you can enable (or disable) the progress of humanity on the Moon. 
  • Habitation - these essential colonies focus on generating life support. Habitation colonies are good because they allow you to add more colonists to the Moon, improving all aspects of the colonization effort. 
As players move from stage one to stage two they will likely find themselves gravitating to one of these four colony archetypes. Focusing your efforts to maximize a particular resource is a good strategy in Shackleton Crater as having surplus resources allows you to engage in trade with other players. We also intend to reward specialization through various mechanical effects, such as improving the rate of resource generation a building provides through upgrades. The net (and intended) effect of the system will be that your stage one colony will start to expand its role after obtaining self-sufficiency and begin to participate in a lunar market that encourages you to do great things on the moon. Do you build one thousand acres of solar panels to fuel the construction of mass habitation or develop new drilling systems to send valuable resources back to Earth? Do you trade life support generated in your lunar greenhouses for scientific data discovered by a neighbor in a crater? 

In our next update, I'll talk more about how your decisions in stage two affect the lunar terrain, as well as how the stage one elements affect your progress. Until next time!

Josef Shindler
Vice President, Joe Got Game

Comments

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    1. Raufgar on

      Indeed, having rewards tied to specific actions undertaken by the player would encourage them to try different options as they go, thus encouraging replayability. A Jack-of-all-trades play style would enjoy a diverse range of rewards, but lack the depth of more focused styles, who would enjoy bigger singular rewards for specializing.

    2. Missing avatar

      Spencer Egart on

      It would be interesting to see gameplay mechanics reward the various combinations of these specializations, rather than just pigeon-holing into one of the four.