ShokBox® - THE ULTIMATE BICYCLE TRANSPORT CASE WITH GPS project video thumbnail
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$24,143
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All or nothing. This project will only be funded if it reaches its goal by .

By Martin Greene
$24,143
pledged of $19,798 goal
backers

All or nothing. This project will only be funded if it reaches its goal by .

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    1. Missing avatar

      Jason Turvey 6 days ago

      Hi Martin,

      I appreciate your reply and all the information, really helpful and if I have any more questions (I think it's now all been covered) I'll DM you.

      Thank You,

      Jason

    2. Martin Greene Creator on November 13

      Hi Jason,
      I totally understand your concerns, and I want to reassure you that this is totally tried and tested tech. The basic principles of this system have been in use for around 10 years. I have sent you some links ( at the bottom) to demonstrate the technology, we have built on this method by incorporating our failsafe tech, such as anti-crush system and impact damping feature for added confidence and reassurance.

      1. Your wheels are stowed within padded bags, the bags only contact with the high-performance foam within the amniotic cavity, the wheels are packed front wheel first, followed by the rear, this accommodates for the offset of the cassette. If the wheels have rotors it’s still not a problem, because the case is designed in such a way, that the rotors will be positioned directly above triangles of the frame. Furthermore, if the case were under load, the anti-crush system comes into play, we have avoided strapping anything to the walls of the case (see previous notes) but once the case is closed, nothing can move, because of the compression from the high-performance foam.

      2. There is no movement within the case, because the foam naturally compresses around the components when the case is closed.

      3. Moving the derailer inwards is my preferred practice, but not essential. Many people may also prefer to totally remove the rear mech, but again, not essential.

      4. The nature of the foam prohibits movement of anything within the amniotic cavity.
      Hope this will helps.. if you have any further concerns, please feel free to DM me and I will pass on my telephone number so we can have a chat

      Regards
      Martin

      Ps. here are a few links of Brands that have adopt a similar system..

      eg. Thule, Scicon, Elite and Polaris

      https://www.youtube.com/watch…

      https://www.youtube.com/watch…

      https://www.youtube.com/watch…

      https://www.youtube.com/watch…

      https://www.youtube.com/watch…

    3. Missing avatar

      Jason Turvey on November 13

      Hi Martin,

      I was having a look at the video on Road.cc on the weekend, it gives a very good overview of the box and it has helped a lot although it has raised some other questions;

      1. How much movement do the wheels have in the case and is there a recess behind the foam for the cassette or disk rotor to align with? I’m just thinking of any potential movement where the rotor could make contact with something (perhaps damaging the frame or slightly bending the rotor).

      2. How much side-to-side movement may the bike have when suspended in the case as there are concerns of the derailleur/fork making contact with the side of the case (more so for the derailleur)?

      3. Would you suggest moving the rear derailleur inwards with a few clicks of the shifter so there is less surface area to make contact with the case?

      4. Are there any velcro straps to secure the bag containing the saddle/seatpost and pedals so that it’s not free to move around the case to avoid any potential damage?

      Thank You,

      Jason

    4. Missing avatar

      Jason Turvey on November 11

      Hi Martin,
      Thank you for the info and I look forward to trying out your product.
      Thanks Again,
      Jason

    5. Missing avatar

      Brian McCusker on November 11

      I really like the innovations you've incorporated in this design Martin, they've addressed a lot of the issues i've experienced too.
      I notice from your Proof of Concept drawings that you've considered a number of locking devices, such as keys and combinations, will these all be available as options?
      Good luck with this campaign. I really hope it succeeds!

    6. Martin Greene Creator on November 11

      Hi Jason
      Great question and glad you brought up the rear mech as this was the catalyst that put my mission into action. We have attempted to explain this in the written campaign, there are also references to this further down the page, but I can see now that it doesn’t give a good level of detail.
      In our research phase we concluded:
      Some of the top selling cases originally based their design around bikes being primarily of aluminium construction.
      Our research highlighted that when a frame and wheels are strapped directly to the walls of the case, that any potential knock or drop could transfer that impact internally.
      In technical terms:
      When a shock load is delivered into the frameset, this could create a load direction which is different from that which the carbon component is designed to withstand during normal use; causing a failure due to a relatively low shock load (the same reason a carbon wing on an F1 car can smash in a hundred pieces after a minor collision) this is an extreme example but it illustrates the risk.
      With this in mind:
      We turned to mother nature for a solution. With ShokBox’s revolutionary impact damping system and smart impact absorbing zones, we incorporated a seminal technology that firmly suspends the frame and wheel within two amniotic type cavities, giving ultimate protection from impact. If you were to imagine an egg yolk or a baby in the womb, they are protected and prevented from impact or contact with the outer edges of the cavity via a fluid, keeping them safe from harm.
      We have essentially replaced that fluid and cocooned the contents of your case within an industrial grade Polyurethane impact absorbing foams.
      See image:

      Once the case is closed, the nature of the materials we selected suspend your frame and wheels firmly and securely within. Movement is restricted, but your precious cargo is prevented from impacting the side walls (cavity) via the foam (liquid).
      In short, nothing can move or rattle around once the case is closed and the foam is in place, keeping all your components (including the mech) free from damage.
      I hope that helps? We have tested this system and with the ShokBox anti crush system it is without doubt the most risk-free solution.
      The wheels and latches are replaceable and will be available to purchase if needed, as will the protective foam inserts etc., should they become lost or damaged.

    7. Missing avatar

      Jason Turvey on November 11

      Hi,

      I can see from the video on packing the bike that you use two velcro straps to secure the top tube, I can see that this would keep the top of the bike in place but how secure is the lower half? I'm thinking that the box will get thrown around by the baggage handlers and I'm thinking about the derailleurs taking a knock if the lower half is not secure.

      Are all the locks and wheels user replaceable in the event of damage and will you supply these as spare parts via your website?

      Thank You,

      Jason

    8. Martin Greene Creator on November 4

      I look forwards to your DM Daddy, but in short. you will be checking in just one item �

    9. Daddy Warbucks on November 3

      Thanks. So will the add-on be a separate item or somehow integrated within the existing case (i.e. Will airlines see me rocking up with two pieces of bike luggage or just one?). Will DM you separately. Love the colours... wish more bike case manufacturers would do the same!

    10. Martin Greene Creator on November 3

      We have formed an Amniotic Chamber for your frame and wheels to sit firmly within. Shielding it from potential impacts. We looked at all options and with our team of expert engineers concluded that connecting your wheels and frame directly to the walls of the case (via skewers and straps) gave a higher risk factor with modern materials. Also, the Anti Crush system is designed to locate through the spokes (for wheels up to 90mm and 36 spokes).

      There is an add-on (coming very soon) that will allow you to carry an additional pair of wheels with this case and this will include Carbon Disc wheels. Would it be convenient to contact me directly and I will be happy to share? This is quite sensitive information and for obvious reasons, I don’t want it in the public domain right now.

      hope this helps

      Thanks again for your support

      Martin

    11. Daddy Warbucks on November 2

      Thanks,

      Given the location of the "impact dampening system" (the large shafts on the inside that cushion side blows), I'm trying hard to visualise how a disc wheel will fit inside so any details you have on that would be greatly appreciated as it seems neither of my default race wheels (Zipp disc and Zipp 1080) will fit.

      Also, how tightly are the wheels held in place? The video shows vertical straps along the outer edge and then a cross strap, but it also seems as though in the middle the spokes that surround the opening in the wheel bag will simply rest on the "impact shaft". If the case gets tossed around and the wheels aren't firmly locked in place, it would seem those spokes would take all the impact.

      The case looks great though (especially all the neat colours) and I think with your price point you'll reach your goal regardless of whether it ends up working for me or not.

      I appreciate any extra details you can provide!
      Thanks

    12. Martin Greene Creator on November 2

      Hi Daddy,
      Many Thanks for your support on my project, and sorry for the delayed response. yes the TT bike needs to remove the bars while Road bikes can usually be left in place. ( some larger frames may need to remove the bars) please see FAQ's

      There is a restriction with disc wheels, but the case is designed to take any rim up to 90mm.. we have an add-on coming down the line, that will facilitate full disc wheels for you TT specialists.

      Kind Regards
      Martin

    13. Daddy Warbucks on November 2

      Two quick questions...
      - I assume that a TT bike needs to have the bars removed, while a road bike simply fits with the bars on... Right?

      - I assume that if you are traveling with a disc or a wheel with a rim deeper than 40mm the case won't work.

      I think it looks like a neat set-up, but if the answer to the second one is "yes", I'm going to have to bow out.