AU$ 603
pledged of AU$ 23,000pledged of AU$ 23,000 goal
8
backers
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Funding Unsuccessful
The project's funding goal was not reached on Sat, September 24 2016 5:30 AM UTC +00:00
AU$ 603
pledged of AU$ 23,000pledged of AU$ 23,000 goal
8
backers
0seconds to go
Funding Unsuccessful
The project's funding goal was not reached on Sat, September 24 2016 5:30 AM UTC +00:00

About

“Nuclear”

Exposing the legacies of the atomic age through creative arts.

Showcase at Tandanya – the National Aboriginal Cultural Institute in Adelaide, South Australia. 

17 September to 12 November.

Official launch Friday 30 September

  • Two 20 minute digital projections – experiments with immersive video projected on a large cylindrical screen.
  • Related exhibitions of photography, sculpture, paintings
  • Performances
  • Experimental radio works
  • Seminars and documentary film screenings
  • Linked with campaigns to stop nuclear waste dumps in South Australia.

Involving more than 50 creative artists – photographers, filmmakers, digital artists, actors, musicians, painters, sculptors and writers, our showcase bears witness to the legacies of the atomic age. Our stories come from atomic survivor communities – those who have experienced the atomic bomb. 

Atomic survivor stories remain relevant and illuminating within the contemporary international debate about ongoing testing and development of nuclear weapons – over 2,000 have been tested since the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They also speak to current debates about Australia's nuclear industry and proposed waste repositories in South Australia.

The video above is an extract from one of our immersive digital projections, 'Ngurini', made by Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists working together. Imagine this on an 8 metre diameter cylindrical screen!

Your donations will help fund installation costs and the public education program for our showcase.

Here is more of our story....

Across 2014-16, community arts company Alphaville has facilitated a program linking artists with communities that have experienced the atomic bomb.  

  • Britain exploded 12 major bombs and conducted hundreds of minor 'trials' on Australian country – with the complicity of the Australian government.

In South Australia, the affected communities include Indigenous Australians – Anangu – who were relocated from traditional lands at the time of the British-run atomic tests at Emu Field and Maralinga in South Australia; and nuclear veterans who served at these test sites during the 1950s and 60s.

Our showcase, which is suitable for all ages, presents stories from these places and people, and fits within a long tradition of artists and communities responding to ‘the bomb’ and its long term effects. 

  • We all live with irreversible radiation impacts – affecting our environment, and our bodies. Plutonium half-lives are up to 24,000 years!

Find out more about us at http://nuclearfutures.org/blog-posts/ 

Here is more about the Showcase with images from the creative works:

DIGITAL PROJECTIONS

Photomedia, screen art, immersive projection, eyewitness testimony and community commentary collide across these two companion art works, designed to screen as one program – '10 Minutes to Midnight', and 'Ngurini' (searching). 

They are for presentation either on an 8 metre diameter cylindrical projection surface, with 6 projectors and 7 speakers. These two digital art works respond to the slow public reveal and long-term legacies arising from the British run atomic experiments at Emu Field and Maralinga in South Australia, and Monte Bello in Western Australia, during the 1950s and 60s. 

  • '10 Minutes to Midnight' is the culmination of a collaborative partnership with representatives from Australian nuclear veteran communities. The creative team worked as artists in residence over 18 months in the south Australian rural community of Balaklava, a place subjected to wind blown contamination from British nuclear tests, and also home to long time nuclear veteran campaigner Avon Hudson who has been a key adviser for the project.
  • 'Ngurini' (searching) explores the forced relocation and intergenerational response of Pitjantjatjara Anangu in the aftermath of Britain’s atomic testing at Maralinga in South Australia. It embodies community stories of landscape and migration, and is inspired by the resilience and hopes of current generations. This work is a culmination of a community-based arts project with Pitjantjatjara Anangu from Yalata and Oak Valley, who were relocated from traditional lands and the Ooldea Mission, from 1952 when Britain commenced its nuclear testing program in Australia. 
'10 Minutes to Midnight': Digital projections within an 8 metre cylinder. These are the centrepiece of our showcase (Photo Danni Marwick)
'10 Minutes to Midnight': Digital projections within an 8 metre cylinder. These are the centrepiece of our showcase (Photo Danni Marwick)

 

Making of 'Ngurini' – a collaboration with the Yalata community in remote South Australia (Photo by J. Boylan)
Making of 'Ngurini' – a collaboration with the Yalata community in remote South Australia (Photo by J. Boylan)

 

Audience interaction is an element of our immersive screenings. 'Ngurini' (which means 'Searching'). Photograph by Danni Marwick
Audience interaction is an element of our immersive screenings. 'Ngurini' (which means 'Searching'). Photograph by Danni Marwick

For more on our immersive digital projections click here

OTHER EXHIBITS

Our digital art works are accompanied by 

  • Portrait of Whistleblower – a photographic exhibition on one anti-nuclear campaigners'  life and work.
  • 'Talking Straight Out' – a collection of images from campaigns against nuclear waste repositories on Aboriginal land. 
  • paintings – Life Lifted into the Sky
  • sculpture – Fat Man and Tree of Life: Gift of Peace
  • and pottery – a collection titled Ebay makes the bomb
'Portrait of a Whistleblower' Photography exhibition by Jessie Boylan – the remarkable story of nuclear veteran Avon Hudson's life long campaign for justice.
'Portrait of a Whistleblower' Photography exhibition by Jessie Boylan – the remarkable story of nuclear veteran Avon Hudson's life long campaign for justice.

For more on 'Portrait of a Whistleblower' click here.

'Talking Straight Out': our showcase includes a display of photographs from the Irati Wanti campaign against nuclear waste dumping on Aboriginal land
'Talking Straight Out': our showcase includes a display of photographs from the Irati Wanti campaign against nuclear waste dumping on Aboriginal land

For more on the current campaign against nuclear waste dumps in South Australia, click here.

We are also pleased to include international stories and experiences of hibakusha (the Japanese term for ‘atomic survivor’), which remain integral to Australia’s Cold War atomic test history; and also soundscapes and radio plays made with British nuclear veteran families.

'Fat Man' life size sculpture of the Nagasaki bomb, made by our fellow artist and Hiroshima descendent Yukiyo Kawano from her grandmother's kimonos and her own hair.
'Fat Man' life size sculpture of the Nagasaki bomb, made by our fellow artist and Hiroshima descendent Yukiyo Kawano from her grandmother's kimonos and her own hair.

 To discover more about Yukiyo Kawano's artistry, click here

Bomb painting by Alinta Smart from Yalata Anangu community, in the collection 'Life Lifted into the Sky' – part of our showcase
Bomb painting by Alinta Smart from Yalata Anangu community, in the collection 'Life Lifted into the Sky' – part of our showcase

Together all these works constitute a creative response to the slow public reveal and long-term legacies (the 'slow emergency') arising from the nuclear bomb tests.

The showcase explores how local experiences have translated into community development and international campaigns for peace and disarmament; and we examine the ‘nuclear past’ as a means of inviting views on the kind of future we can imagine.

Our supporters

If you are able to make a donation, it will sit alongside financial and in-kind support we have received from several organisations, including:

The Australia Council for the Arts, Arts SA, the Graham F Smith Peace Foundation, The Global Hibakusha Project, Yalata Community Inc, Maralinga Tjarutja Council, In Place of War, Archive of Nuclear Harm, Atomic Photographers Guild, British Nuclear Test Veterans Association, Mayors for Peace, Fremantle City Council, Wakefield Regional Council, Adelaide Festival Fringe, Murdoch University, University of New South Wales, Winchester University, Queensland University of Technology. Nagasaki City Council, Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Survivors Council.

Risks and challenges

We need your support to help fund installation costs for our showcase, and a program of community education and engagement – so that these stories are shared via schools who visit the showcase, members of atomic survivor communities who will travel from remote locations for the showcase, and the general public.

Ensuring that the showcase reaches these audiences is the key challenge we face. Our budget for the showcase is stretched thin – so your donation will ensure we engage communities.

We are new to Kickstarter. If we thought we could raise $150,000, then that is what we really need to allow us to tour our showcase in 2017-18 – to remote parts of Australia and to the UK and Japan. But for now we are hoping to support the Adelaide installation.

Lighting equipment – $7,000
Storyteller fees – $5,000
Travel for remote area community members – $6,000
Publicity and promotion – $4,000

If we are fortunate enough to raise more than our minimum, $22,000, we can start on the production of a 'webisode' that we are making about our project, and we can support future touring.

To see what we mean by 'webisode' go to https://vimeo.com/177879161 which is a 10 minute film about a sculpture gift to Nagasaki – another stand of our arts program.

If you would like to contact us direct, please email me, Paul Brown Creative Producer at: alphaville@iprimus.com.au

And we hope you will enjoy the rewards that come with your donations. These are ready for distribution.

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Support

  1. Select this reward

    Pledge AU$ 50 or more About $37

    'Maralinga Song' CD

    Aboriginal visual artists and musicians have produced a CD – a song translated into Pitjantjatjara, to convey stories from the era of British nuclear testing at Maralinga in South Australia. Limited edition CD with paintings decorating the cover and the story of the project.

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    Pledge AU$ 100 or more About $73

    Print of original block carving

    These beautiful black and white prints (approx 25cm by 20cm) are by community members from Yalata and Oak Valley. They depict daily life or community stories, including the atomic bomb tests.

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    Pledge AU$ 250 or more About $183

    Maralinga: the Anangu Story – book

    Communities around the Maralinga bomb test site, with author Christobel Mattingley, have produced a remarkable book that conveys the upheaval caused by nuclear testing but also the spirit in these resilient communities.

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    Pledge AU$ 500 or more About $367

    Pack of three: book, CD, print

    Get your copy of 'Maralinga: the Anangu Story, also a copy of 'Maralinga Song' CD and an original print by one of the indigenous artists in our creative team.

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Funding period

- (28 days)