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Finally, a toy you can have a real conversation with!
1,226 backers pledged £68,121 to help bring this project to life.

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    1. SaltyBrains
      Superbacker
      on

      to all those who have not hit the "report" button on the projects homepage;

      so if you have not already, could you please do so ? i am sick of these stupid updates im sure you must be too. this is well beyond a joke at this point. his account needs freezing, kickstarter has to step in and do something here.

      he quite obviously can not handle the responsibility of a simple project-related-update tool.

    2. SaltyBrains
      Superbacker
      on

      your crazy;
      -the only bully here is you.
      - the only one levelling threats to anyone is you.
      - the only one breakings kickstarters terms and conditions is you.

      its all you ashley. this update is a clear example of that too.

    3. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      Think Nice Thoughts

    4. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      Mental anguish is an element of non-economic damages usually sought in personal injury cases, medical malpractice and sometimes defamation cases. Generally, "mental anguish" translates to certain types of suffering that may include distress, anxiety, fright, depression, grief, or trauma. In many jurisdictions, plaintiffs may recover for mental anguish; however, some states set compensation caps on non-economic damages.
      Non-Economic Damages
      Non-economic damages cover certain type of injuries that are not out-of-pocket losses, including pain and suffering, disability, disfigurement, humiliation, mental anguish, loss of consortium (companionship) as well as emotional distress. Because these damages are often difficult to calculate and, juries may overcompensate and non-economic damages can exceed actual economic damages. There is no standard formula to calculate these non-economic damages; therefore they vary on a case by case basis and are referred to as subjective damages because they differ according to a plaintiff's personal or subjective experience.
      In most cases, to recover non-economic damages, the plaintiff must show by a preponderance of the evidence (which means "more likely than not") that they suffer these injuries. If they cannot meet this burden of proof, they will not recover.
      History of Damages for Mental Anguish
      Damages for pain and suffering, including mental anguish, date back to Roman delicts, which is equivalent to today's tort system. The basic Roman delicts were iniuria (injury to person) and damnum iniuria datum (damage to property, including slaves). Under iniuria, the wronged party had to show that the tortfeasor acted willfully and intentionally to recover damages. The action was based on the plaintiff's "sense of outrage" and not on actual economic loss. Therefore the plaintiff could be compensated for "pain or distress of mind or body" in addition to any pecuniary damages. Whereas iniuria required a showing of ill will, damnum iniuria datum only required a showing of negligence. Eventually, Roman law evolved into only compensating for pain and suffering where the tort was intentional and only providing pecuniary damages in the sole case of negligence.
      Under early English law compensation was afforded for slander and libel, and much later, shame, because shame "was keenly felt."
      Compensation Caps on Non-Economic Damages
      Several states have sought to control increasing non-economic awards by implementing compensation caps for these types of damages. Most of these compensation caps directly address medical malpractice issues where malpractice premiums rose to a level to become disincentives for physicians to practice. The tort reform of non-economic damages was intended to ameliorate this situation and protect doctors and health facilities from exorbitant damages. However, advocates against caps argue that caps unduly penalize those victims who may require a level of damages to compensate for lifelong losses that can never be regained.
      California is one state where the compensation cap on non-economic damages in medical malpractice cases has been codified. Under California's Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act of 1975 (MICRA), a patient's non-economic damages may not exceed $250,000.
      Consult an Attorney for Legal Advice
      If you suffer mental anguish arising from a case of personal injury or medical malpractice, you may recover non-economic damages. However, in some jurisdictions, you may only be allowed to recover a specified maximum. Also, you will have to prove your injuries by a preponderance of the evidence. Talk with an experienced attorney to discuss the details of your case.
      Updated by: David Goguen, J.D.

    5. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      This comment has been removed by Kickstarter.

    6. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      This comment has been removed by Kickstarter.

    7. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      This comment has been removed by Kickstarter.

    8. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      This comment has been removed by Kickstarter.

    9. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      This comment has been removed by Kickstarter.

    10. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      This comment has been removed by Kickstarter.

    11. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      This comment has been removed by Kickstarter.

    12. Cameron (BLINK) on

      STOP PUSHING YOUR FUCKING RELIGION ONTO ME YOU FUCKING SHITSTAIN

    13. Missing avatar

      Danny Silberman on

      I can't wait to get my bear and sell it on eBay so that I can at least recoup half my wasted pledge money!

    14. Mark on

      You want it to stop. Very very very easy even for someone like you. Send a refund to everyone whom wants out because of this FAILED project. The bear does nothing promised. All goes away. Also might be worth you seeking some medical help you clearly have issues.

    15. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      I have suffered beyond any human soul

    16. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      Same goes for you Ticketmaster as your read this.

    17. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      You think behind your PC your can escape the LAW?

      NO

    18. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      I have suffered beyond any human should. You think your clever. You think you can say anything? sorry no. NO.

      As God is my witness, I will seek justice.

      It does matter how many years it takes,

      I will get justice.

      It does not matter the cost, I will spend every cent and penny I own to bring justice.

      I have lived a life of FEAR and SUICIDE because of YOU.

      Do you think you can do this?

      Say anything you like?

      Sorry NO.

      I and I will with my last breath prove to you the law says no.

      NO CYBER BULLYING MY FRIEND

    19. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      From all Trolls.

    20. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      I want damages for ALL the pain.

    21. Supertoy Robotics Creator on

      Mental anguish is an element of non-economic damages usually sought in personal injury cases, medical malpractice and sometimes defamation cases. Generally, "mental anguish" translates to certain types of suffering that may include distress, anxiety, fright, depression, grief, or trauma. In many jurisdictions, plaintiffs may recover for mental anguish; however, some states set compensation caps on non-economic damages.
      Non-Economic Damages
      Non-economic damages cover certain type of injuries that are not out-of-pocket losses, including pain and suffering, disability, disfigurement, humiliation, mental anguish, loss of consortium (companionship) as well as emotional distress. Because these damages are often difficult to calculate and, juries may overcompensate and non-economic damages can exceed actual economic damages. There is no standard formula to calculate these non-economic damages; therefore they vary on a case by case basis and are referred to as subjective damages because they differ according to a plaintiff's personal or subjective experience.
      In most cases, to recover non-economic damages, the plaintiff must show by a preponderance of the evidence (which means "more likely than not") that they suffer these injuries. If they cannot meet this burden of proof, they will not recover.
      History of Damages for Mental Anguish
      Damages for pain and suffering, including mental anguish, date back to Roman delicts, which is equivalent to today's tort system. The basic Roman delicts were iniuria (injury to person) and damnum iniuria datum (damage to property, including slaves). Under iniuria, the wronged party had to show that the tortfeasor acted willfully and intentionally to recover damages. The action was based on the plaintiff's "sense of outrage" and not on actual economic loss. Therefore the plaintiff could be compensated for "pain or distress of mind or body" in addition to any pecuniary damages. Whereas iniuria required a showing of ill will, damnum iniuria datum only required a showing of negligence. Eventually, Roman law evolved into only compensating for pain and suffering where the tort was intentional and only providing pecuniary damages in the sole case of negligence.
      Under early English law compensation was afforded for slander and libel, and much later, shame, because shame "was keenly felt."
      Compensation Caps on Non-Economic Damages
      Several states have sought to control increasing non-economic awards by implementing compensation caps for these types of damages. Most of these compensation caps directly address medical malpractice issues where malpractice premiums rose to a level to become disincentives for physicians to practice. The tort reform of non-economic damages was intended to ameliorate this situation and protect doctors and health facilities from exorbitant damages. However, advocates against caps argue that caps unduly penalize those victims who may require a level of damages to compensate for lifelong losses that can never be regained.
      California is one state where the compensation cap on non-economic damages in medical malpractice cases has been codified. Under California's Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act of 1975 (MICRA), a patient's non-economic damages may not exceed $250,000.
      Consult an Attorney for Legal Advice
      If you suffer mental anguish arising from a case of personal injury or medical malpractice, you may recover non-economic damages. However, in some jurisdictions, you may only be allowed to recover a specified maximum. Also, you will have to prove your injuries by a preponderance of the evidence. Talk with an experienced attorney to discuss the details of your case.
      Updated by: David Goguen, J.D.

    22. Andrew Nicholls
      Superbacker
      on

      Are you seriously calling everyone with a mental health issue a troll?

    23. Missing avatar

      James Cha on

      I agree completely agree with Mathew and Peter. Sending something like this out can be interpreted as trolling also. Thank you for your hard work.

    24. Missing avatar

      Peter on

      @Matthew, complete agreement here, and awesome to hear you've got your bear! Do you have any thoughts about the bear that you might be willing to share with those of us who are waiting? :-)

    25. Matthew Muir on

      Ashley - PLEASE just stick to Bear updates. Trolls are only fuelled by posts like the one above - You're better than that aren't you? I have 1 of my bears, so I know that they're real.

    26. Missing avatar

      TK on

      So...your backers are mentally handicapped, and you are a Christ figure?

      I still don't have my bear dude.