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Imagine spending the rest of your life behind bars. 50, 60, 70 years until you die, and for what? Drugs... No possible parole, no hope! Read more

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Imagine spending the rest of your life behind bars. 50, 60, 70 years until you die, and for what? Drugs... No possible parole, no hope!

Phil Lee
Project by

Phil Lee

First created  |  3 backed

See full bio Contact me

About this project

Our Dream:

To help obtain freedom for our six featured individuals by bringing the details of each of their stories to light in a one-hour documentary. There are currently over 3,500 people wasting away, serving life sentences without parole in federal prisons for non-violent offenses. Of that total, over 2,000 are in for drug charges, dying a slow death. 

For all of these individuals, their only hope now is through presidential clemency. There is strength in numbers. You can make a difference. Please review our project details, join us and help out any way you can!


How You Can Help:

Regardless of where you may stand on the issue of drugs... Please take a look at the details of each individual case, and decide if these people deserve to be locked up with no hope until they die. Imagine how you would you feel if one of these individuals were your son, daughter, mother or father? The families of these prisoners are currently living that nightmare. Please stand with me and support this project with your pledge. If you are new to Kickstarter: we receive no funds unless our goal is met within the specified time frame. Please feel free to share this project with your own friends and family through email, facebook, etc.

After learning about Tim Tyler's hopeless situation, (and many others like him) I really felt inspired to do something in order to shed light on this horrible practice of twisted justice. At age 23, Tim was sentenced to die in federal prison for selling LSD.  I interviewed Tim’s sister Carrie, and created the short promo video for them (at the top of this page)... “Deadhead Journey: Life Without Parole.” Our goal is to expand this project into a one hour documentary that will give a voice to the faces, families and the stories of these prisoners, and hopefully inspire more people to become involved.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/26/justice/sentencing-clemency/index.html?hpt=ju_t5

Please understand, this is not about going soft on crime. It is obvious all of these people made poor decisions and broke laws. Instead, it is about using common sense, valuing human life and making the punishment fit the crime. The idea of locking someone away and throwing away the key here in America is maddening! Try as I might,  I still cannot totally get my head around that concept. And I cannot quit thinking about these individuals who are day by day, dying a slow death.

Someone can kill, rape, kidnap, torture, commit assault with a deadly weapon, and any other vile act you can imagine, and depending on circumstances, still walk out of prison 15, 20 years later with a 2nd chance at life. But not with drugs. Back in the 80s and the 90s, lawmakers with good intentions passed sweeping legislation that was intended to get tough on crime and keep our streets safer. However, the vast majority of these mandatory sentencing laws instead have sent non-violent offenders to prisons, and in effect condemning  2,034 souls to die a slow death behind bars on drug offenses. (as of 2012 statistics)

My hope is that our audience will see themselves, their brothers, sisters, sons and daughters in the shattered lives and stories we present. By presenting this film at college campuses, film festivals, online and potentially television broadcast, we hope to raise awareness and inspire compassion as well as outrage that can lead to real change. This is where you come in. By getting involved with your love and support you can help open doors.

How your generosity, love and support will be utilized:

We will shoot interviews with family members in order to gain insight through their personal stories and experiences of their incarcerated loved ones. Federal prisons often deny access to cameras- however we will solicit each prison/warden in the hope of being allowed inside to shoot interviews with our featured subjects. We will also conduct interviews with a variety of individuals within the system all across America: legal scholars, judges, attorneys, activist organization reps (ACLU & FAMM) and others to gain a better understanding of the current mandatory minimum sentencing laws, and to explore ways the system needs to change.

Our goal: To make an informative, emotional film that will allow an audience to empathize with the plight of these individuals, shed light on this unjust, inhumane system, and to motivate the public into taking action to affect real change.

From production, labor costs, music licensing and post production editing... we need your financial help and support to make this a reality!

Craig Cesal, 54, is a first-time felony offender serving LWOP for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute marijuana.

Craig's only prior conviction was a misdemeanor for carrying a bottle of beer into a Bennigan’s bar when he was a college student in 1981, for which he paid a $150 fine. For more than 23 years, Cesal owned and operated a towing and truck repair business that provided services to police departments and sheriffs, car and truck rental companies, and trucking companies. His company retrieved trucks throughout the Midwest. Cesal’s clients also included Sun Hill, a trucking company whose drivers sometimes trafficked marijuana.

Cesal explains that over the span of many years, drivers employed by Sun Hill would drop off semi-trailers at his shop for needed repairs after they were torn apart from smuggling contraband. Then, his company would return the truck to the rental company; sometimes the drivers would pay his company to retrieve the truck or trailer before repairing and returning it. For instance, on one occasion, his company retrieved a semi leased by Sun Hill that had been impounded at the United States-Mexico border, secured the truck’s release from DEA custody, made repairs to panels DEA agents previously ripped from the trailer, and returned the trailer to the leasing company. Cesal says that at no time did he think he was breaking the law.

Cesal was arrested in 2002 when he traveled to Georgia to retrieve a rented semi discarded at a recycling center by Sun Hill workers who had transported, offloaded, and departed with 2,667 pounds of marijuana from Mexico. Cesal was accused of conspiring with more than 20 co-conspirators, including the Sun Hill employees.

Those who provided, received, bought, and sold the marijuana were arrested and prosecuted in Texas, Florida, North Carolina, and elsewhere. “I was never accused of buying, selling, possessing, or using marijuana—and I didn’t,” Cesal says. “I never had a stake in the success of any marijuana venture—my repairs were required whether or not the driver was busted.”

On the advice of his attorney, whom he says advised him he would get a sentence of seven years, Cesal pleaded guilty. He says he subsequently learned that under the terms of the plea agreement, he would have to testify in any grand jury, deposition, or trial requested by prosecutors. Cesal recalls prosecutors wanted him to testify against a number of people he did not know and two people he believed were innocent of the charges against them.

Because Cesal breached the plea agreement by refusing to testify falsely against others, he was sentenced to a mandatory LWOP sentence under the federal sentencing guidelines for his first felony conviction. He says, “I voted my conscience and breached the plea agreement. I do not believe my sentence should have been inextricably intertwined with my ability or inability to provide substantial assistance in the prosecution of others.

”All of Cesal’s eight co-defendants pleaded guilty in exchange for sentences ranging from 50 to 130 months. He says, “In my case, those who did traffic marijuana received little or no prison sentences and resumed their activities. They patronize a different repair station now.”

Cesal was 42 years old when he was arrested. He was married with two children, He held the same job for over 20 years, and had owned his home since 1983. Now 54, he has been incarcerated for 11 years. While in prison, he has earned his paralegal certificate through a correspondence course and works tirelessly as a jailhouse lawyer assisting other prisoners with their cases.

He speaks weekly with his children, Lauren and Curtis, who were 14 and 10 years old, respectively, when he was incarcerated. Cesal is devastated that he has to “forever endure [his] life in prison,” and says, “I hope to die, sooner rather than later.

Source: ACLU "A Living Death" Sentenced to Die Behind Bars for What? 

Sharanda Purlette Jones, a mother with no prior criminal record, is serving life without parole for a crack cocaine conspiracy based almost entirely on the testimony of co-conspirators.

A couple in Terrell, Texas was arrested on drug charges and became confidential informants, which triggered a larger investigation in the small town. While acting as government informants after their arrests, the couple asked Sharanda during a taped telephone call if she knew where they could buy drugs. According to evidence presented at trial, Jones in turn responded that she might know someone she could introduce them to so that they could buy drugs.

Jones was indicted and voluntarily surrendered to police in April 1999; at the time, she was 32 years old and raising her eight-year-old daughter. She had never been arrested before. In August 1999, she was acquitted on six counts of crack cocaine possession and found guilty of one count of conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine.

There was no physical evidence presented at trial that connected her to drug trafficking with her five co-conspirators—no producible amount of drugs, video surveillance, or any other physical evidence. Other than the taped phone call, the allegations were based entirely on the testimony of co-conspirators.

Each of these co-conspirators testified against Jones in exchange for reduced sentences, pleaded guilty, and is now out of prison. Notably, Jones’s supplier was sentenced to 19 years and released from prison in 2008. The trial court concluded that Jones had sold cocaine to the two buyers, who converted the powder cocaine into crack before selling it to others. Even though Jones had no criminal record, she was sentenced to mandatory life without parole in November 1999. Jones says of her sentencing, “It was devastating and shocking tome, my body was silent and numb—I couldn’t respond I was so shocked.”

Sharanda has been incarcerated for more than 14 years. She is 45, and her daughter,  Clenesha Garland, is 22. Even though Clenesha was only nine when her mother went to prison, the two remain very close and Clenesha calls the eight years she spent living with her mother “a definite gift from God.” She visits her mother at least once a month and corresponds with her weekly. Jones says she carefully apportions her allotted 300 monthly minutes for non-legal calls to speak with her daughter for 10 minutes each day.

“I miss my mother dearly. Even as a young adult it is very difficult for me to fight back my emotions during visits and phone calls with my mother,” Clenesha says. “Being without my mother for over 14 years of my life has been extremely difficult. But the thought that she is set to spend the rest of her life in prison as a first-time nonviolent offender is absolutely devastating.... All I pray for every day is the blessing of being able to spend my life with my mother outside of prison walls."

Source: ACLU "A Living Death" Sentenced to Die Behind Bars for What? 

SHARANDA'S WEBSITE: http://www.iamsharandajones.org/

Please sign Sharanda's Petition for Presidential Clemency: http://www.change.org/petitions/president-barack-obama-sharanda-jones-does-not-deserve-to-die-in-prison         

 Timothy Tyler is a vegan Deadhead who was sentenced in 1994, at age 24, to two mandatory life without parole  sentences for conspiracy and possession with intent to distribute LSD because of 5.2 grams of LSD he mailed to a confidential informant.

Tyler grew up in Connecticut with his mother, stepfather, and sister; as a teenager, he says he moved to Florida to live with his father and escape physical abuse at the hands of his stepfather. After graduating from high school, he traveled around the country to follow the Grateful Dead and became a regular user of LSD. According to Tyler, LSD was a spiritual sacrament to him, and he overdosed on the drug several times, triggering episodes of mental illness that required hospitalization in mental health institutions. He sold fried dough at Grateful Dead concerts and would feed other Deadheads for free when they could not afford food.

In 1991, when Tyler was 21, he was arrested twice for selling small amounts of LSD and received probation both times. In May 1992, he sold marijuana and LSD to a friend who had become a confidential informant and was setting up drug buys for federal law enforcement in exchange for a lighter sentence. Five times over the course of two months, Tyler mailed hits of LSD to the informant.

In August 1992, when he was 23, he was arrested and charged with three co-defendants, including his father. Tyler pleaded guilty to possession of LSD with intent to distribute and conspiracy to possess LSD with intent to distribute. According to Tyler, his public defender told him pleading guilty would get him a reduced sentence of 21 years. Instead, he was sentenced to mandatory life without parole on each count because of his two previous convictions and the amount of LSD he was convicted of selling.

Because the judge counted the weight of the “carrier” paper the LSD was placed on in addition to the 5.2 grams of LSD, Tyler was held accountable for selling more than 10 grams of LSD, a threshold amount that triggers a mandatory minimum sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole on a third offense.

Tyler reports he was never made aware of the fact that there was a mandatory minimum life-without-parole sentence before he pleaded guilty. As the sentence was mandatory, the judge could not consider Tyler’s drug addiction, lack of violent conduct, mental health issues, or young age. Without the mandatory minimum based on his prior offenses, Tyler would have received a sentence of 262 to 327 months under the federal sentencing guidelines.

Tyler says of his sentence, “Life, it says, but life means you die in prison.” His sister, Carrie Tyler-Stoafer, who talks with her brother every other day and calls him her best friend, told the ACLU that Tyler struggles to cope with his sentence to die in prison. She said, “If he had a release date he could look forward to—he has nothing to look forward to, no release date—it would change everything. He was looking forward to 2012, the end of the world, because at least he would get out. For a decade, he was looking forward to that date, and he was so disappointed when it didn’t happen. He keeps his hope alive by using his mind to play tricks on himself.... A release date would keep him going to help him get through this.”

She explained of her brother’s sentence, “It’s worse than a death in your family, and I’ve lost a lot of loved ones. It’s never-ending because he’s still there and your heart just keeps breaking over and over.”   

Source: ACLU "A Living Death" Sentenced to Die Behind Bars for What?

TIM'S WEBSITE: www.freetimtyler.com

Please sign Tim's Petition for Presidential Clemency: https://www.change.org/petitions/my-brother-was-sentenced-to-life-without-parole-for-a-nonviolent-drug-offense

 Ricky Minor, a self-described meth addict at the time of his crime, was sentenced to LWOP after just over one gram of methamphetamine and over-the-counter decongestants were found in his home.

Minor was born and raised in Niceville, a town in the Florida Panhandle. He says he began using drugs at 13, dropped out of school at 16, and became addicted to cocaine at 20. He ran a carpet installation business for 15 years, married, and tried to be a responsible father to his daughter and two stepchildren, but he says he struggled with depression and drug addiction; after a period of sobriety, he became addicted to methamphetamine in 1998.

Minor was convicted of a number of nonviolent prior offenses, and served no time for those priors.  In 2000, acting on a tip from a confidential informant, police found 1.2 grams of methamphetamine dissolved in liquid in Minor’s home. They also found an over-the-counter decongestant (pseudoephedrine), acetone, matches, and lighter fluid.

Although there was no meth lab in Minor’s home, the Drug Enforcement Agency estimated that 191.5 grams of methamphetamine could have been produced from the decongestant pills, an estimate that sentencing guideline experts later determined was far too high.

Minor says he never sold meth and reduced the recipe to make only enough to support his and his wife’s addiction. Initially, Minor was charged under state law; he recalls he was told he faced a two-and-a-half-year sentence. He says the prosecutor threatened to “bury [him] in the federal system” if he would not cooperate, but he refused to snitch on others.

Minor was sentenced to mandatory LWOP as a career criminal in August 2001. Judge Clyde Roger Vinson, an appointee of former President Ronald Reagan said when sentencing Minor, “The sentence...far exceeds whatever punishment would be appropriate.... Unfortunately, it’s my duty to impose a sentence. If I had any discretion at all, I would not impose a life sentence...I really don’t have any discretion in this matter.”

Minor’s mother, Judy Minor, told the ACLU, “I was sitting in the courtroom when it happened, and it was all I could do to stay seated in my chair. I was so shocked. I just couldn’t believe they could do that to him. Forwhat they didn’t find...no money, no violence.”

Minor told the ACLU, “For this to happen to someone like me, I was devastated.... I had a drug problem. I had been dabbling in drugs all my life, but hurt someone? Never. I never even carried a gun.... The hardest thing is how minor the crime that I did was, and my past history, and I get this lifetime sentence.” He added, “I was raising a family. I was a responsible person, and all this was destroyed and my life was taken away from me over some sinus pills.”

Minor’s nuclear family has fallen apart since his incarceration in February 2001. His ex-wife, who also struggled with drug addiction, was unable to care for their daughter. Minor’s retired parents have been raising his teenage daughter, Heather, since he was incarcerated when she was seven years old. Heather told the ACLU that when her father was sentenced, “I was so young I didn’t grasp that for the rest of my life he wouldn’t be here. At 10, I started to grasp that he would never come home and I’d be alone forever and that was how it was going to be.”

During his 12 years in prison, Minor has earned his GED and taken classes in computer skills, business, real estate, and accounting. He reports he has stayed sober since his incarceration and completed a 40-hour drug abuse education class, but is not eligible for the 500-hour residential drug treatment program because he will never be released from prison. He is now 50 years old and says that he is a changed man since getting sober.

Source: ACLU "A Living Death" Sentenced to Die Behind Bars for What?

 Douglas Ray Dunkins Jr. was sentenced to LWOP at age 26 for conspiracy to possess and distribute crack cocaine.

The trial court found that from ages 23 to 25, Dunkins manufactured and distributed crack cocaine for a Fort Worth, Texas-based drug conspiracy comprised of 15 co-conspirators. No drugs were ever seized in the case, and Dunkins was convicted largely on the basis of testimony from co-conspirators who received reduced sentences in exchange for their testimony.

Dunkins was sentenced to a mandatory sentence of life without parole; if had he been sentenced for an equal amount of powder cocaine instead of crack, he would have received a sentence of 20 years. At sentencing, Judge Terry R. Means told him, “It does seem unfair that the guidelines bind me to give you a life sentence.... It troubles me to think that you at your age [are] going to have to spend the rest of your life in prison. It troubles me a lot.”

It was Dunkins’s first felony conviction. He had only one prior misdemeanor conviction for shoplifting from Kmart when he was 21 years old, for which he received one-year probation. “To have no release date is devastating, as a first-time nonviolent offender,” he says.

“I can’t even remember being sentenced; I was in a total daze that they pulled a life sentence on me. I didn’t understand the sentence at

the time. Two to three months later, I find out a life sentence is a life sentence. I’m surprised that I am still able to function.”

Dunkins, now 47, has been incarcerated for nearly 22 years. If the crack/powder cocaine disparity were eliminated, he would already have been released from prison. His three daughters, who were only one, five, and six years old when he was incarcerated, are now in their twenties; two are in medical school. He stays in touch with his daughters and mother weekly.

He says of being separated from his daughters, “It’s devastating, horrible, not being around to see them graduate and go to school and day-to-day function as a family should. I missed their graduations.” He adds, “I missed out on a lot, with my family. I missed out on marriages, funerals.”

Dunkins says that his mom, Bonnie Dunkins, cries whenever she visits him. Bonnie, who has Stage 4 cancer, told the ACLU, “I ask God to help me to hold on. I just want to live, God’s will, to see him come home...I just pray and ask God to let me live to see him home.” She adds, “His father didn’t live to see him be released. Whatever my oncologist gives me, I don’t object. I’m just trying to hold on for my son. I love him. I just pray that I live to see that day that he walks through that door.”

Bonnie remains extremely close with her son, who says he desperately wishes he could be released from prison to support her. “That’s my only son and he was such an inspiration and a big help to me when he was at home. We just did everything ogether, and I miss him. It’s been hard for me,” Bonnie says. “I just miss him so much. He’s my only son. I have three daughters, but no one takes the place of Douglas Ray Dunkins Jr.”

For nearly a decade, Dunkins has worked as a certified paralegal, assisting other inmates with their cases; he says he loves doing legal work. He has completed an array of educational and vocational programs while in prison and has held several prison jobs, including a position working in the prison’s food administration warehouse.

He says that if he were released from prison, he would mentor youth to ensure they avoid making the mistakes he has made and work as a paralegal. “Given a second chance, I know that I would be much more productive,” he says. “Prison has opened my eyes to a lot of things in life in general. And it’s educated me.”

Source: ACLU "A Living Death" Sentenced to Die Behind Bars for What?

Today it was announced that the presidential clemency program is expanding! There is an estimated 23,000 prisoners that might meet the new criteria, and the White House is expecting to receive record numbers of clemency requests. Please support our project so that the current 2,034 souls who are serving LIFE WITHOUT PAROLE for drugs will have a chance for their voices to be heard!

87% of all Federal inmates are in for non-violent offenses. Because of mandatory minimums, our Federal prison population has exploded, increasing by 800% since the 1980s. In addition, it costs taxpayers an estimated $31,000 per year to pay expenses to incarcerate each of these non-violent prisoners every single year.

 https://www.aclu.org/living-death-sentenced-die-behind-bars-what

Risks and challenges

Probably our most difficult challenge will be dealing directly with various Federal prisons. Obtaining access to shoot on-camera or audio interviews is really up to each warden/administration, and their existing media policies. We will be flexible with scheduling and very open to work with each administration facility in whatever capacity they allow.
Regardless of prison access, the bulk of our content will come from each prisoner's family, and by the various agencies, activists, and individuals that are involved in the criminal justice system, so possible lack of prison access will not be an issue for the success of the project.

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