NZ$ 1,250
pledged of 20.000 NZ$ pledged of 20.000 NZ$ goal
17
backers
0seconds to go
Funding Unsuccessful
The project's funding goal was not reached on Mon, April 30 2018 12:00 AM UTC +00:00
G. Ian  TemplerBy G. Ian Templer
First created
G. Ian  TemplerBy G. Ian Templer
First created
NZ$ 1,250
pledged of 20.000 NZ$ pledged of 20.000 NZ$ goal
17
backers
0seconds to go
Funding Unsuccessful
The project's funding goal was not reached on Mon, April 30 2018 12:00 AM UTC +00:00

About

Final Round: Fight is a Fighting Card Game which captures the action, the strategy, and the excitement of traditional 6-button Arcade Fighting Games, and delivers them without the needed dexterity and muscle memory such games usually require. Faster attacks beat slower attacks, blocks beat incoming attacks, throws beat blocks, and no-one will beat you once you master your chosen Character.

Final Round: Fight is a modular game, which can be expanded on with new cards and new characters to keep the environment fresh. At its most compact, Final Round: Fight is a two-player fighting card game with pre-made decks representing two of the characters in the game. It can fit in your pocket and can play on even compact flat surfaces. At its most expansive, it is a game with numerous characters which are able to be acquired as individuals or in a set, each with enough cards to make every possible variation of the deck the character can use, and is played by an expansive network of players.

Final Round: Fight is the culmination of approximately three decades of passion for fighting games, two decades of involvement in card games, and five years of learning to do all the things which go on behind the scenes of a card game after one life-changing decision.

For a more in-depth video explanation of how Final Round: Fight is played, watch

 Two-Player (Vs) Pack

Everything needed to immediately jump into the game. The Character Cards, Ultimate Attacks, Basic Blocks and Decks for two characters, playable straight out of the box. Carefully balanced to show off each characters unique style and be an even match between them.

Tetsuya Character Card
Ultimate Attack: Daylight
Ultimate Attack: Rising Star
Basic Block (feat. Tetsuya)
Vapor Switch x3
Quick Sun-Yi Style x6 (feat. Tetsuya)
Heavy Tsunaan Style x6 (feat. Tetsuya)
Quick Slipstream x2
Strong Slipstream x3
Heavy Slipstream
Quick Blinding Flash x3
Heavy Shurisugen x3
Shining Sun-Yi Style x3 (feat. Tetsuya)
Gracious Sun-Yi Style x3 (feat. Tetsuya)
Majestic Sun-Yi Style x3 (feat. Tetsuya)
Diving Tsunaan Style x3 (feat. Tetsuya)
Cunning Tsunaan Style x3 (feat. Tetsuya)

Lea Character Card
Ultimate Attack: Shock and Awe
Ultimate Attack: Rolling Thunder
Basic Block (feat. Lea)
Firewall x3
Quick Sun-Yi Style x6 (feat. Lea)
Quick Fireheart Style x4 (feat. Lea)
Quick Flashbang Assault x3
Strong Flashbang Assault x3
Heavy Flashbang Assault x3
Quick Broadside Sweep x3
Strong Broadside Sweep x3
Quick Detonation x3
Strong Detonation x3
Majestic Sun-Yi Style x3 (feat. Lea)
Shining Sun-Yi Style x3 (feat. Lea)
Blazing Fireheart Style x3 (feat. Lea)
Sly Fireheart Style x2 (feat. Lea)

The double-sided playmats, which are approximately 1/8" thick, 24" wide and 14" long, and which feature Lea on one side and Tetsuya on the other are awesome to play on. With a smooth, low-friction surface, soft cushioning, and the fantastic artwork showing off your favorite character enhance the experience of play, they are 100% superfluous. Ideal for people who like to game in comfort and style.

$25,000 - Character Pack Lea and Character Pack Tetsuya.

By reaching this stretch goal, Lea and Tetusya will become available as Character Packs, with their full array of moves for deck customization.

LEA - CHARACTER PACK CONTENTS

Lea Character Card / Ultimate Attack Card 1
Lea Character Card / Ultimate Attack Card 2
Lea Character Card / Ultimate Attack Card 3
Basic Block (feat. Lea)

Firewall x3
Throw x3 (feat. Lea)

Quick Sun-Yi Style (feat. Lea) x6 
Strong Sun-Yi Style (feat. Lea) x6
Heavy Sun-Yi Style (feat. Lea) x6
Quick Fireheart Style (feat. Lea) x6
Strong Fireheart Style (feat. Lea) x6
Heavy Fireheart Style (feat. Lea) x6

Quick Flashbang Assault x3
Strong Flashbang Assault x3
Heavy Flashbang Assault x3
Quick Broadside Sweep x3
Strong Broadside Sweep x3
Heavy Broadside Sweep x3
Quick Detonation x3
Strong Detonation x3
Heavy Detonation x3

Majestic Sun-Yi Style (feat. Lea) x3
Shining Sun-Yi Style (feat. Lea) x3
Gracious Sun-Yi Style (feat. Lea) x3
Imperial Sun-Yi Style (feat. Lea) x3
Blazing Fireheart Style (feat. Lea) x3
Sly Fireheart Style (feat. Lea) x3
Savage Fireheart Style (feat. Lea) x3
Vital Fireheart Style (feat. Lea) x3

Character Pack - Lea
Character Pack - Lea

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TETSUYA - CHARACTER PACK CONTENTS

Tetsuya Character Card / Ultimate Attack Card 1
Tetsuya Character Card / Ultimate Attack Card 2
Tetsuya Character Card / Ultimate Attack Card 3
Basic Block (feat. Tetsuya)

Vapor Switch x3
Throw x3 (feat. Tetsuya)

Quick Sun-Yi Style (feat. Tetsuya) x6 
Strong Sun-Yi Style (feat. Tetsuya) x6
Heavy Sun-Yi Style (feat. Tetsuya) x6
Quick Tsunaan Style (feat. Tetsuya) x6
Strong Tsunaan Style (feat. Tetsuya) x6
Heavy Tsunaan Style (feat. Tetsuya) x6

Quick Slipstream x3
Strong Slipstream x3
Heavy Slipstream x3
Quick Blinding Flash x3
Strong Blinding Flash x3
Heavy Blinding Flash x3
Quick Shurisugen x3
Strong Shurisugen x3
Heavy Shurisugen x3

Gracious Sun-Yi Style (feat. Tetsuya) x3
Imperial Sun-Yi Style (feat. Tetsuya) x3
Majestic Sun-Yi Style (feat. Tetsuya) x3
Shining Sun-Yi Style (feat. Tetsuya) x3
Cunning Tsunaan Style (feat. Tetsuya) x3
Diving Tsunaan Style (feat. Tetsuya) x3
Elusive Tsunaan Style (feat. Tetsuya) x3
Flowing Tsunaan Style (feat. Tetsuya) x3

Tetsuya Character Box preliminary concept
Tetsuya Character Box preliminary concept

$40,000 - New Characters Unlocked

New Character 1: Ocks. Ocks is an MMA fighter and specialist in grappling and throws. Although lacking in speed and intellect, Ocks makes up for his shortcomings with his overwhelming strength. Formerly a player of numerous full-contact sports, his recklessness and brutality led to his disbarment from participating in all but the most bloody of competitions. Using the elements of Fire and Earth, Ocks is bully in battle and a force to be reckoned with.

New Character 2: The Hermit. The Hermit is a lost soul, a wandering loner, a man haunted by a past he can't remember. Washed ashore without any memory of who he is or where he comes from, he is driven by an insatiable force which leaves him wandering beaches and cliffsides at the edge of the sea. Able to call on a mysterious otherworldly power, he has unsurpassed endurance and determination in battle. Using the elements of Water and Earth, The Hermit will not be stopped.

New Character 3: LeVelle. LeVelle is a furious fashionista, a diva divine, and hell in heels. Drag has never been so fierce as when LeVelle is on the scene. The ultimate killer queen, slaying the competition with a style that is all her own. Equality is central to LeVelle as she appears to give as she takes, but this lady is no gentleman as she always gets what she wants. Using the elements of Earth and Air, LeVelle puts a new meaning to striking a balance.

 $45,000 - Battle Royale Box Set. All five initial characters with their complete sets of cards in one boxed set. 485 total cards and incalculable variations on the decks which can be played. Master one or master them all, anyone with the Battle Royale Box Set will be able to make every conceivable deck in the game.

* What is the meaning of the High, Mid and Low zones? Do they affect what cards do?

- The High, Mid and Low zones can mean either areas on your opponent you're attacking, or the amount of distance between the characters when you're doing a move. Some characters have moves in which the zones matter, but for the most part, they are there for flavor/thematic reasons.

* Why do some cards not have anything for their Attack Speed?

- Cards with No Value for their Attack Speed, such as Block cards and some Special Attack cards, don't use Attack Speed to determine if they are successful. In the case of Block cards, any attack which is played against them is unsuccessful. In the case of Special Attack cards, they have special rules which can mean they're compared against an empty zone, and any card played against an empty zone is automatically successful, just as any card played against a non-Block card with No Value Attack Speed is automatically successful. When cards with No Value Attack Speed are turned face-up in a tie-breaker, they are counted as having a lower Attack Speed than any card with a numerical Attack Speed.

* Won't I run out of cards if I have to use them to attack and do combos?

- When players draw cards, they're taking cards from the pool of cards they have already lost from their Deck due to being Damaged. It is intended to represent the "red health" aspect incorporated into some traditional fighting games, while also being a buffer to prevent players from effectively taking Damage for drawing cards.

* Which game that I've never heard of did you get these characters from?

- The characters in Final Round: Fight are 100% original. At some points through the development process, characters from other games were used as stand-ins in order to show off the kind of game Final Round: Fight was striving to be, until such times as it was appropriate to put funding into original art for the game. There had been consideration of licensing existing properties, but it was ultimately easier to make original characters to fit the game rather than to fit the game to pre-existing characters.

* Where did you go to in order to get the cards made?

- Since the seventh generation, theGameCrafter.com has been the go-to for the physical cards. Before then, as a means to keep costs down, it was a matter of designing everything at home, putting all the files onto a USB thumb drive, taking a bus into town and using the printers at a stationary store to print everything out on standard printer paper, then cutting everything by hand for playtesting.

* Why aren't the characters fighting each other? What is with the shadow-guy?

- The shadow character which Lea and Tetsuya are depicted as fighting is a generic character used to be whatever is needed for any given depiction of moves. Another cost-saving measure which was implemented out of necessity. While it would have been cool to see Lea throwing a punch at LeVelle, or to show Tetsuya delivering a precise strike to an unsuspecting Ocks, those things would have to wait until there was more of a budget than what could be fished out from between the couch cushions. Another case of "Use what you have" and "Do what you can."

* What about extra characters?

- At present, there are five characters which have fully fleshed out character concepts and move lists. Lea, Tetuya, Ocks, The Hermit, and LeVelle. If the project can get overfunded to the point where there is enough for the graphic content for those characters to be created, they will be made available as soon as possible. Beyond them are five additional characters, known as M, Grinn, Mei and Wei, Aa'cha, and Ares. And still more to come, for as long as people want them.

* What is your vision for the future of Final Round: Fight?

- I envision Champions Packs; packets of cards featuring the characters in alternate outfits or colorations, with new art and improved card stock, to be made available to compliment the character packs and to use as prizes for organized competition. I don't like the standard pay-to-win structure of other games, but I do like opening packs, so the prize cards are for personal satisfaction rather than competitive edge.

What is now Final Round: Fight first began as a thought exercise into "What is my idea of an ideal game." Throwing ideas around regarding games which had come and gone, games which had withstood the test of time, what did they do and how can I emulate their successes? This idea of what would my ideal game look like became the rudder by which I steered my life, and the passage "Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can" became my drive.

The game I had always wanted was a fighting card game which did an awesome job of emulating the 6-button arcade fighting games I had fallen in love with in my youth. If I was going to make that kind of game, I was going to need some strong mechanics to hang it on. The starting point, for me, was in the action of hitting and combo-ing your opponent. Combos were a staple and frequently most-loved aspect of the games I was trying to be like, so I started working on how that could be represented in a card game. I started out keeping my goals realistic, and opened a spreadsheet. I shuffled numbers around, making cards with an Attack Speed and Damage, sometimes the ability to combo, sometimes other abilities which are poorly documented and your guess is almost as good as mine as to what they do. The first prototype was a marvel; a thing of beauty to behold.

Generation 1
Generation 1

Butterflies and flowers. Cut from a book of press-on tattoos and added to hand-scrawled notation on slips of paper hastily cut, stuck to cards from one of the games I wanted to emulate, photocopied, recut, put into card sleeves and played according to rules which were mostly not made up on the spot. "Hey guys, help me test my fighting card game. It's got butterflies and flowers." And to this day I am thankful they did.

The biggest reason I'm thankful is because despite the grand ideas behind it, the execution was not so much a game as an amalgamation of concepts for gameplay. "So, what is the game called, or, going to be called?" Someone asked as they cast a skeptical eye over my questionable offerings. "It doesn't have a proper name yet, just a kind of project title: "ZODIA.""

The first iteration of the game lasted scarcely longer than the time it took fabricate. But a common idea in the game-making community is to "fail faster." So, what worked, the Attack Speed and Combo interaction which allowed for progressively narrower windows of opportunity made the cut. The simultaneous gameplay which had each player play a card from their hand face-down before seeing who got the hit, and blocks being used to draw cards, did not.

So, the first set of cards were taken out, divided up and given to some of the people who had been most supportive of the fledgling game, with jokes about maybe being worth something someday. The process of making, printing, cutting, testing and discarding what was still in large part loose amalgams of raw game-concepts repeated a couple of times. But the repetition honed more than the ability to cut out a couple hundred or so card-sized pieces of paper by hand.

Generation 3
Generation 3

By the start of generation 3, we had started making cards in a graphic program, using art scavenged from across the internet as something to fill the space. What was previously little more than a pile of pieces was starting to fall together into the form of an actual game.

With the rules starting to make sense as a cohesive game, focus began to curve outward, into the realms of balancing, flavor and a richer player experience. Filled with new ideas, I went ahead and made way too much work for myself, making about two dozen cards for each of four elements, throwing numbers around, making up ways of giving each portion a more distinct identity through their abilities, and ultimately ending up with another massive number of cards to extricate from the A4 sheets on which they were printed.

Generation 4
Generation 4

By the fourth generation, several things were going on. I was now working largely solo on the project, which itself was now in a place where people previously enthusiastic to help were more uncertain about its viability. But, as ever, when I came to an impasse, I would asses the state things were in, then once more start from where I was, using what I had to do what I could.

Developing the concept of four factions under four Elements gave inroads to balance cards against one-another. Associating particular values to particular Elements, such as cards with above average stats and a downside in Fire, or cards with difficult to anticipate effects in Water, or heavy-hitters with little ability to combo in Earth, or putting above-curve speed and below-curve damage on Air cards gave characters associated with those elements their fighting styles.

The testing for these extended range of cards required longer than previous iterations. The more developed, complicated and convoluted the game got, the longer the durations between game fixes would emerge. Keeping motivated, and playtesters involved, was difficult. Sometimes, outright degenerate strategies would slip through the cracks, and errata would be added on-the-fly to keep things from unraveling. But even with its adapting form as ideas were shown to work and others not, this generation too had to run its course. As was the fate of previous generations before it, it too was pulled apart and moved on from.

So back to the drawing board once more, to see what could be done. When the dust next settled, something very strange had emerged.

Generation 5
Generation 5

Three numbers where previously there had only been two. Ultimate Attacks on their own cards. New Zealand influenced art in the scant places there was anything to look at beyond a spartan presentation of information. What was going on?

This was possibly the most difficult growing phase for the game. The extended periods between updates and then the update emerging appearing to be as half-baked as a much earlier generation meant that it was more favor-calling than player interest which kept the game going through this phase. What was actually happening was much more involved behind-the-scenes. With the structure of the game now involving three numerical values on all cards, and an array of characters which represented two elements each, there were a lot of numbers trying to find balance. On top of this, and although it is not visually apparent, there was significant effort being put into learning how to improve the graphical quality of the game.

The jump from two numbers to three wasn't the only significant change that was seen in this generation. It was while testing the game that one of the players remarked about how it felt disadvantageous to draw cards, since that brought them closer to losing. This observation was the catalyst around which the card drawing system changed so that players would draw from the cards they had already lost to being Damaged rather than immediately from their Decks.

Generation 6 to 6.5
Generation 6 to 6.5

 With enough features working in harmony to capture what I felt was the action of fighting games, it came time to bring in tying the mechanics to theme.

With the improved visual aspect, people were more interested in aiding in playtesting. This meant that there was more opportunity to test the game and refine features. Minor features in the presentation and play were tweaked, adjusted and balanced through this generation. But toward the end of this generation, the numbers of cards which were needed for testing were becoming too much for printing on A4 paper and cut out with scissors. With five characters each needing over 100 cards to represent their full array of options, and the game reaching the point where it wasn't unreasonable to have more effort put into its production, it was time to see about starting to incorporating production companies. 

Generation 7
Generation 7

 The first custom printed cards had a kind of happy accident in production, as when they arrived, rather than featuring the ugly cardback of a novice making clear mistakes to learn from, the cardbacks were printed in a much less garish flat black.

I recall going to my friendly local game store (Gaming DNA, which at the time was under a different name), the place where I would playtest with members of the card gaming community in Hamilton, with a box full of plastic bags and freshly printed cards. I took it as a good sign for the game when people who had not previously played were interested in helping to sort and then play with the cards.

testing with the Blackbacks
testing with the Blackbacks

 The game was taking its form, which meant the next part of the process would be shaping it into a sellable product.

Playtesting in this phase involved a lot of player observation. Watching players to learn the mechanics of the game, and how long after that before they understood them well enough to use them to gain an advantage. Seeing how they were inclined to arrange their cards without strict guidance. These observations helped in making a rulebook, or in the case of the next iteration of printing for testing, a set of rule cards.

7.3 "Fighting Card Game"
7.3 "Fighting Card Game"

 Five characters, each able to do almost 30 different moves, and with some of those moves needing to have as many as 6 copies in card form for full extension of customizable options, it felt like the game was finally here.

With the list of things still needed to have a game I could sell almost as low as the number in my bank account, playtesting resumed. Quickly, I learned the well-intended system of having the "rulebook" on cards was not as intuitive as I had expected. Players would read cards out-of-order and be confused when they weren't able to follow on the rule they had been considering. That, however, was the only significant glitch which was to emerge for quite a while.

By now, it was becoming clear that the games mechanics and content were, but for minor balance adjustments, ready to go. Unfortunately, funding had come to the point of asking for favors and loans to keep the dream alive, and one of the biggest hurdles to making the game was still to be overcome; Game art. For a long time, I had been developing my meager abilities in making the borders and iconography for the game, so that meant funding could be more easily put into getting art for each card.

The project as a whole was too much to take on all at once. So I pared it down to what I believed I could accomplish and set out to make that.

7.4 Final Round: Fight - Lea VS Tetsuya
7.4 Final Round: Fight - Lea VS Tetsuya

The most achievable path became to make a two-player pack. By putting aside most of the characters, there was significantly less ground that the art budget had to cover. A pair of reasonably balanced decks which featured a good array of the characters abilities were made, which could fit, along with a rulebook, into a box the size of a single complete character. This narrowed the scope of needed art even further.

Impatient to find how a two-player pack of the game would be received, I made a plan to get a few pieces of high-quality content for the flashiest cards in the game to use as examples of what I had planned for the rest of the two-player pack (and by extension, the rest of the game), so I could have some prototypes made as soon as possible.

With my dozen or so packs for Presentations and Promotions, I set out to local game stores and whichever events I could get to in order to show off the game. Frequently, the response was in essence: the game was good, but the graphic content, which was cobbled together in order to avoid infringing on copyrights and still represent a fighting game, was a major drawback.

Wellycon - 2017
Wellycon - 2017

Which brings things almost all the way up to now. The response to the game in this 2-player form was enough that I could secure a path to get the rest of the art made for the 2-player pack.

The dream of someone who started where they were; lost in the world, out of work, living with the aid of family, crippled by depression and with scarcely a hope to hold onto, using what he had; a decade-an-a-half-out-of-date computer, an internet connection, the cheapest transport options available, the printers at a stationary store, an amazing community of friends and gamers, and a patient, grinding will, to do what they could to make the kind of game, and life, they only ever thought of in vague and distant terms is coming true.

Detailed move lists have already been drawn up for even more characters. M, the seductive Kunoichi with a venomous touch. Grinn, the insane jester; he who laughs last. Ares, a priest from the darkest realms who gives willingly of himself in exchange for power. And more still to be announced. Final Round: Fight has been, from the outset, designed to be modular and expandable with new rosters of characters to keep the game fresh.

In the future, as part of a push to establish organized play, packs of randomized cards featuring alternate outfits/colorations, improved graphics, and premium cards in "Prize Packs" are intended to be made for use in promoting structured play. Organized events which reward players with packs of cards to further their collections have proven to be a significant draw for other collectable card games at low-level events, with larger financial incentives being a draw for larger events. The goal is to build up to large events by selling "Prize Packs" which enhance players' decks and give incentive for playing and trading.

A very small print run was made and has been taken on-tour at local and distant card game stores, and at meetups of the fighting game community. Players from a wide background of games; Tekken, Street Fighter, Mortal Kombat, Magic: the Gathering, and Y-Gi-Oh all took to the game quickly. Halfway through April, Final Round: Fight will be showcased at the first major fighting event in the Waikato Reigon: Waikato Arena Rampage, to introduce the game to as many new players as possible.

Risks and challenges

The risks which come with this project arise primarily from the lack of experience with the production side of gaming. All efforts have been made to learn what is required, and many significant challenges in how to make and distribute product have already been taken on and overcome. New challenges will always arise, and it is expected that they will be handled with the same tenacity which has propelled progress throughout the making of this game.

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  1. Select this reward

    Pledge NZ$ 30 or more About $20

    Final Round: Fight - VS Pack

    Everything that is needed to immediately begin playing in one convenient little box. Two 45 card decks representing characters, along with their Character Cards and Ultimate Attack cards, and a Rulebook featuring visual guides to everything in the game.

    If Stretch Goal 1 is reached, backers will be able to choose to instead receive a Lea Character Pack or a Tetsuya Character Pack.

    If Stretch Goal 2 is reached, backers will be able to choose to instead receive an Ocks Character Pack, a The Hermit character pack, or a LeVelle Character Pack.

    Includes:
    • Final Round: Fight Vs Pack - Lea Tetsuya
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    Pledge NZ$ 60 or more About $41

    2-Hit Combo

    Two-player pack and a Double-sided playmat, featuring Ultimate Attack art from Lea and Tetuya.

    If Stretch Goal 1 is reached, backers will be able to choose to instead receive a Lea Character Pack or a Tetsuya Character Pack.

    If Stretch Goal 2 is reached, backers will be able to choose to instead receive an Ocks Character Pack, a The Hermit character pack, or a LeVelle Character Pack.

    Includes:
    • Final Round: Fight Vs Pack - Lea Tetsuya
    • Double-Sided Playmat
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    Pledge NZ$ 85 or more About $58

    3-Hit Combo

    Two-player pack and two Double-sided playmats, featuring Ultimate Attack art from Lea and Tetsuya.

    If Stretch Goal 1 is reached, backers will be able to choose to instead receive a Lea Character Pack or a Tetsuya Character Pack.

    If Stretch Goal 2 is reached, backers will be able to choose to instead receive an Ocks Character Pack, a The Hermit character pack, or a LeVelle Character Pack.

    Includes:
    • Final Round: Fight Vs Pack - Lea Tetsuya
    • Double-Sided Playmat
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    Pledge NZ$ 110 or more About $75

    4-Hit Combo

    A pair of Two-Player Packs and a pair of Double-Sided Playmats.

    If Stretch Goal 1 is reached, backers will be able to choose to instead receive up to two Lea Character Packs or up to two Tetsuya Character Packs, or a mix of Character Packs of their choice (maximum 2 Character Packs).

    If Stretch Goal 2 is reached, backers will be able to instead receive up to two Ocks Character Packs, or up to two The Hermit Character Packs, or up to two LeVelle Character Packs, or a mix of Character Packs of their choice (maximum 2 Character Packs).

    Includes:
    • Final Round: Fight Vs Pack - Lea Tetsuya
    • Double-Sided Playmat
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    Pledge NZ$ 150 or more About $102

    5-Hit Special Combo

    Five Two-Player Packs and a Double Sided Playmat.

    If Stretch Goal 1 is reached, backers will be able to choose to instead receive up to five Lea Character Packs or up to five Tetsuya Character Packs, or a mix of Character Packs of their choice (maximum 5 Character Packs).

    If Stretch Goal 2 is reached, backers will be able to instead receive up to five Ocks Character Packs, or up to five The Hermit Character Packs, or up to five LeVelle Character Packs, or a mix of Character Packs of their choice (maximum 5 Character Packs).

    If stretch goal 3 is reached, players will be able to choose instead to receive a Battle Royale Box Set containing all five characters.

    Includes:
    • Final Round: Fight Vs Pack - Lea Tetsuya
    • Double-Sided Playmat
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    Pledge NZ$ 180 or more About $122

    5-Hit Ultimate Combo

    Five Two-Player Packs and a pair of Double Sided Playmats.

    If Stretch Goal 1 is reached, backers will be able to choose to instead receive up to five Lea Character Packs or up to five Tetsuya Character Packs, or a mix of Character Packs of their choice (maximum 5 Character Packs).

    If Stretch Goal 2 is reached, backers will be able to instead receive up to five Ocks Character Packs, or up to five The Hermit Character Packs, or up to five LeVelle Character Packs, or a mix of Character Packs of their choice (maximum 5 Character Packs).

    If stretch goal 3 is reached, players will be able to choose instead to receive a Battle Royale Box Set containing all five characters.

    Includes:
    • Final Round: Fight Vs Pack - Lea Tetsuya
    • Double-Sided Playmat
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Funding period

- (29 days)