$3,755
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backers
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Funding Unsuccessful
The project's funding goal was not reached on Mon, July 27 2015 2:00 AM UTC +00:00
$3,755
pledged of 10.000 $pledged of 10.000 $ goal
63
backers
0seconds to go
Funding Unsuccessful
The project's funding goal was not reached on Mon, July 27 2015 2:00 AM UTC +00:00

Andromeda

1 like

Hello everyone.

As with the first Kickstarter, I'll be introducing you to a different portrait subject every week. Andromeda was announced in the first cycle but became the first in the second cycle (lucky #13!) so this is a public preview of some of what I shared with backers of the first project.

Andromeda is a continually growing and changing, smart and intense, nearly post-subjective humanoid. She recently gave a great interview for the Kids Like Us project. She's currently raising money to bring a partner to NYC for a musical collaboration - pitch in if you can! She makes electronic and folk music as well as glitch art and plays banjo in Possum. I can honestly say that Andromeda has always seemed to have an aura of a destiny of greatness, and it seems amazing how young she is and how much she has done and will do, while remaining just a kind and funny and self-aware person.

Andromeda, oils on canvas, 36x60in, April 2015
Andromeda, oils on canvas, 36x60in, April 2015

I remember the first time I met a trans girl- that I knew of at least. It was my first day of college and I was in line to get some orientation stuff and I saw this cool looking girl with a floor length skirt on. I remember thinking "Man, that's– why can't I be confident in myself like that? Why can't I wear my skirts and just exist like that." I had been sort of exploring myself but it was always under the guise of my sexuality and never gender, because that wasn't real it wouldn't happen.

I ended up being friends with that girl later down the road, just like I'm friends with many of the people who I had looked up to in that confusing time. The sense of normalcy and like, they weren't "role models" or these lofty unreachable figures. They were women existing, in the ways that I wished I could have for years. I guess it was just comforting to see this existence normalized, to see trans women living and being.

I think that's why this project is so important to me, because it took 18 years to see any of this outside of the context of a joke or some lofty fantasy I was dreaming up. Even as a progressive person, even as a GSA leader, even as a weird gender thing myself I never saw people who looked like me or expressed the thoughts I had bouncing around in my head.

I happen to really dislike being as exceptionally annoying to people I like as is required to promote projects like this, and I really can't do it without your likes and shares. I definitely can't paint the last 7 portraits or make a second calendar without your support. Please help! 

daughtersofmercury.com

Yours,

Janet

Janet Bruesselbach likes this update.

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