$1,332
pledged of $1,330 goal
backers

All or nothing. This project will only be funded if it reaches its goal by .

$1,332
pledged of $1,330 goal
backers

All or nothing. This project will only be funded if it reaches its goal by .

About

Following the successful birthing of How To Make Life Nice I'm now keen to publish my previously written novel, The Glass Girl. With your help, I will produce a limited edition of 200 copies, typeset in Baskerville and beautifully printed on acid-free forestry commission paper; and these will be baptised in fizz and music at a launch party later this summer.

The Glass Girl is another bittersweet comedy, this time a period piece, written and set in Bristol around 2004, about a woman in her very late thirties (thirty-twelve) who suddenly decides to finish a childless relationship and start a family with another man. Unfortunately, she doesn't have another man. So begins her somewhat panic-ridden search for the perfect father and mate, the progress of which is complicated by the arrival of her teenage niece.

Celebrated, intelligent, tasteful novelist Tessa Hadley called it: "An energetic funny novel, full of treats."

Here's the song I wrote for it, played by me, Andy Davis and Simon Fish, and mixed by Leon Hunt:

And here are a couple of draft cover designs. (Comments appreciated.)

Yes, I know - too much sand in the top half...

By the way, here's the above, photographed as it appeared on two different screens:

...demonstrating the need for cover proofs.

I know I haven't got it right yet. The advice of a designer friend is a) to simplify and b) to draw letters rather than use Apple fonts and c) maybe even draw the whole damn thing.... (or get a designer friend to do it.)

Risks and challenges

If I raise the dosh, the books will be printed and delivered. The only challenge will be in meeting the July deadline - as I write this, the manuscript hasn't yet been completed. If there's any delay I will promptly notify all subscribers.

Here are answers to some questions I'm frequently asked:

Why don't you publish it properly?

No publisher would take it! - which doesn't mean it's not worth reading. It means that it wouldn't make money because it's out of date, and I'm unknown, and the people who might enjoy it are not easily identifiable. This project doesn't replace my ambition to be published properly; it's a stage towards that (so far) lifelong goal - a plan B for my writing which will make it easier to embark on the next novel, and then the next.

Why don't you just bung it up on Kindle?

A book is more pleasurable and more permanent. (It will be available on Kindle, ibooks, kobo and nook anyway.)

Why don't you use print-on-demand?

You can't vouch for quality in a remote process, and p-o-d would cost more per book.

How will you promote it?

I'll get some mentions on Bristol radio and in the local paper.

Is that all?

Yes. I have no talent as a promoter and would rather rely on word of mouth.

How will you sell it?

If I raise the publication cost I won't need to. The remainder will be available on Amazon and by order through any bookshop, just as How To Make Life Nice Is. If I ever achieve any recognition of any sort in the future, some people might be interested and will easily find it.

Isn't that the same as vanity publishing then?

Not really, because I won't spend anything on it except time. It may be vanity, but, if it is, I don't care.

What's the point if it won't make any money?

There are lots of points: I want to finish my work, to honour it and to take responsibility for it. It's a legacy – a communication across time. If it's published, it might be read, if not, it's unlikely to be; it will clutter my drawers, drag on my conscience, and be guilt-inducingly dumped on surviving relatives when I die. Published authors rarely make money from their writing anyway. One writes for other reasons, such as to be read and because 'I've always written' and 'I'm a writer' and 'writing is what I do best'.

Bloody hell, is anyone really such a rude bastard as to ask a question like that?

And worse.

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    Printed Thanks

    Your name printed on the Acknowledgements page of The Glass Girl

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    The Glass Girl

    Your name printed on the Acknowledgements page plus one printed copy of The Glass Girl, either delivered to your door or ready to be collected with a free glass of fizz at the launch party in July.

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