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Turn your BeagleBone Black into a wide-band (0-30 MHz) SDR with a multi-user web interface. Includes a software-defined GPS receiver.
Turn your BeagleBone Black into a wide-band (0-30 MHz) SDR with a multi-user web interface. Includes a software-defined GPS receiver.
Turn your BeagleBone Black into a wide-band (0-30 MHz) SDR with a multi-user web interface. Includes a software-defined GPS receiver.
294 backers pledged $70,757 to help bring this project to life.

About this project

KiwiSDR: BeagleBone Software-defined Radio (SDR) with GPS project video thumbnail
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KiwiSDR: BeagleBone Software-defined Radio (SDR) with GPS

$70,757

294

What is KiwiSDR?

KiwiSDR is a software-defined radio (SDR) covering shortwave, the longwave & AM broadcast bands, various utility stations, and amateur radio transmissions, world-wide, in the spectrum from 10 kHz to 30 MHz. The KiwiSDR is a custom circuit board you connect to an inexpensive BeagleBone Black or Green computer. Add an antenna, power supply, internet connection, then install the software package to be running in minutes.

An HTML5-capable browser and internet connection will let you listen to a public KiwiSDR anywhere in the world. Up to four people can listen simultaneously to one receiver — each listener tunes independently.

Try it right now! Click to listen to a test site in Sweden, Canada or New Zealand:

New KiwiSDR receivers will be listed on the sdr.hu website.

Full 0 - 30 MHz spectrum, early evening at SK3W in Sweden (click for larger)
Full 0 - 30 MHz spectrum, early evening at SK3W in Sweden (click for larger)
Cyprus over-the-horizon-radar (OTHR) as received in New Zealand (click for larger)
Cyprus over-the-horizon-radar (OTHR) as received in New Zealand (click for larger)

Features:

  • Browser-based interface allows up to 4 simultaneous user web connections per KiwiSDR.
  • Each connection tunes an independent receiver channel over the entire spectrum.
  • Waterfall display tunes independently of audio and includes zooming and panning.
  • 100% Open Source / Open Hardware / Open PCB.
  • Extra attention paid to VLF/LF performance.
  • Automatic frequency calibration via received GPS timing.
  • Easy hardware and software setup.
  • Browser-based configuration interface.

Hardware:

  • Compatible with BeagleBone Black/Green cape specification.
  • Multi-channel, parallel DDC design using bit-width optimized CIC filters.
  • Linear Technology 14-bit, 65 MHz ADC.
  • Xilinx Artix-7 A35 FPGA, programmed from the Beagle.
  • Integrated 12-channel software-defined GPS receiver.
  • Skyworks SE4150L GPS front-end.

Software:

  • Web interface based on OpenWebRX from András Retzler, HA7ILM.
  • Integrated software-defined GPS receiver from Andrew Holme's Homemade GPS Receiver.
  • Simple build environment. Recompiles on Beagle from clean in two minutes.
  • Beagle server-side written in C/C++, Javascript on the browser, Verilog for the FPGA.
  • Automatically starts when the Beagle (re)boots.
  • Optional automatic software updates over the network.
  • Configuration and admin settings accessed through browser interface or text files.
  • ADPCM audio and waterfall compression to minimize required network bandwidth.
  • All sources are on Github.

Why did we make it?

Sure, the world doesn't really need another SDR. But we haven't found one with this set of features. In cost and performance, KiwiSDR fits between RTL-SDR USB dongle-style, or fixed DDC chip devices ($20 - $400, 8-12 bit ADC, limited bandwidth), and full 16-bit SDRs ($700 - $3500) while offering better wide-band, web-enabled capabilities than the more expensive SDRs.

Then there is the educational aspect. Building KiwiSDR has been a fantastic way to learn the practical details of SDR and GPS design. We strongly encourage you to pull apart the code and firmware to see how things work. Find a bug or have a better way to implement something? Great! Please let us know.

Our main motivation is to enable new applications which utilize a significant number of programmable, web-accessible SDRs world-wide. Direction finding remains one of the great under-solved problems of shortwave listening, particularly for utility stations. Given the GPS timing available on the KiwiSDR, could time-of-arrival techniques between cooperating SDRs be used? We'd sure like to find out.

Also, we'd like to see data decoders built directly into the web interface of KiwiSDR. There are many standalone programs that demodulate and decode data signals from SDRs. But these are computer- and OS-specific and often require a complicated interface to the data stream from the SDR. For example, we have a prototype of a WSPR decoder that is integrated into the KiwiSDR interface.

Gerber view of some of the PCB layers (click for larger)
Gerber view of some of the PCB layers (click for larger)

Why we need your help

We have three functioning prototypes, which are available to try at sdr.hu. Ten more are in production. But to go any further we need funds to cover tooling, test fixture development, expansion of the beta test program, volume purchase of certain expensive parts, and boot-strapping of production.

About the rewards

We are deliberately keeping this Kickstarter simple with two rewards: The "board" reward is the low-cost option for those of you who have the needed components and are comfortable putting it all together. The "kit" reward is for those who want a more complete solution.

The "board" KiwiSDR is simple to install with a certain amount of experience and knowledge about radio concepts, BeagleBone operation and network administration. You will need to provide: a BeagleBone, radio antenna, GPS antenna and power supply.

The "kit" reward described in the sidebar combines the KiwiSDR board with a BeagleBone Green, enclosure, pre-installed software and GPS antenna. You will need to provide: the radio antenna and power supply.

Note that to achieve the full signal processing speed required, every single CPU cycle of the Beagle's ARM processor needs to support the 4 receiver channels. In other words, the KiwiSDR Beagle is dedicated and cannot also run other Linux software simultaneously. Further, the software distribution will overwrite any existing software on your Beagle in order to standardize installation.

All receivers need a radio antenna. The online documentation provides advice but there are lots of possible solutions. We have our own active antenna design under development.

The 5V power supply for the Beagle is country-specific as AC power and plug styles vary around the world. Low-cost switch-mode wall adapters commonly used to power Beagles usually generate loud radio interference. We will report our test results of the recent higher quality switch-mode power supplies (SMPS) in the Kickstarter updates section and welcome your reports.

The KiwiSDR is not a complete "product" in its current form. Rather, you should consider it as an evaluation unit or development platform, without guaranteed performance specifications or certifications. This is Kickstarter after all. We consider each backer a valuable partner who can provide feedback and new ideas in addition to financial support. Any post-Kickstarter product will likely be priced higher than these rewards.

How will it be manufactured?

We are working with a well-known product development company in Shenzhen. They do more than assemble PCBs. They provide finished devices, tested and ready to ship. This is especially important for the "kit" reward.

Xilinx Artix-7 A35 FPGA logic utilization "floorplan" (click for larger)
Xilinx Artix-7 A35 FPGA logic utilization "floorplan" (click for larger)

What remains to be done?

We need to complete tasks associated with manufacturing and fulfillment: parts procurement, post-assembly test planning, packaging design, etc. A few software tasks must be completed before shipping can begin such as finishing the configuration interface. Feature wish list: we have our list. As you use the KiwiSDR, let us know yours!

About shipping

The rewards prices do not include shipping. By keeping the reward price low, by charging actual shipping costs separately, any VAT/GST/duty fees will be lower. When we are ready to ship, we will ask for payment for your choice of several shipping options ranging from "ground" to "air". We will update the FAQ below with country-specific information.

Schedule

Our schedule analysis estimates delivery in October 2016 for the board and November for the kit. This includes delivery time and some margin. We'll try and beat this estimate, but we should all be prepared for delays as well.

We're going to post a Kickstarter update once-a-week, every week to let you know about our progress. Too often we've seen Kickstarter projects disappear for months at a time between updates. We promise not to do this.

Additional information

  • Detailed information is contained in our 60-page design review document.
  • KiwiSDR forum.
  • Website with development history.
  • C/C++/Verilog source code, schematics, PCB layout (KiCAD) and BOM all on Github.
Overview of hardware design (click for larger)
Overview of hardware design (click for larger)

Our thanks

Thank you for backing our project. And if you decide to make your KiwiSDR available to listeners on the internet, thanks for allowing all of us to hear what shortwave radio sounds like from your location.

KiwiSDR Team Members

JOHN SEAMONS

John, ZL/KF6VO, is the principle designer of KiwiSDR. After a long career in the tech industry (Lucasfilm Ltd., Pixar, NeXT, Sun Microsystems, a couple of his own startups) he is finally finding time to work on topics like SDR and GPS that have long fascinated him.

MICHAEL JONES

Michael started Valent F(x) in hopes of creating unique electronic designs for the electronics community and providing electronics design consulting. He has guided KiwiSDR into production based on the experiences of the successful LOGi FPGA development board Kickstarter. Michael enjoys designing hardware, firmware, software and PCB's. Michael co-founded Valent F(x) in the hopes of creating versatile platforms for beginners to advanced users to use FPGAs in conjunction with popular embedded platorms or in a standalone fashion.

JONATHAN PIAT

Jonathan is an associate professor at the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Paul Sabatier University of Toulouse (France). Jonathan co-founded Valent F(x). He holds a joint appointment in the Laboratory for Analysis and Architecture of Systems, a CNRS research unit where he is now working on the integration of robotics algorithms on FPGA-based dedicated hardware. His main research interests include dataflow-models, hardware/software co-design, embedded vision and robotics.

The busy 40m Amateur and 41m Broadcast bands at night (click for larger)
The busy 40m Amateur and 41m Broadcast bands at night (click for larger)

Risks and challenges

Please refer to our 60-page design review document (link in "additional information" section above) for a complete discussion of the design risks of the hardware itself. Given the performance of the KiwiSDRs at the beta test sites we're pretty confident about the design.

We've tried to use parts that will have long-term availability. But short-term shortages during production is always a schedule risk.

Any project using contract manufacturing faces multiple third-party risks. It helps tremendously that we have used PCB fabrication and assembly at two separate companies in Shenzhen for the prototypes. Our fulfillment house has a history of working with Kickstarter rewards.

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Support this project

  1. Select this reward

    Pledge $1 or more About $1.00

    SUPPORTER: Be able to ask a question or give some advice in the comments section which is only open to backers. Support our secondary costs like tooling, test fixture development, beta test program, etc.

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    16 backers
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  2. Select this reward

    Pledge $20 or more About $20

    LISTENER: Support free KiwiSDR placement world-wide. These funds will help us ship a number of KiwiSDRs free of charge to under-represented locations around the world. You get to vote on the locations. We're particularly interested in Africa, South America, Antartica, the South Pacific, Indonesia and the Russian Far East.

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    14 backers
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  3. Select this reward

    Pledge $199 or more About $199

    BOARD: A KiwiSDR add-on board (cape) for the BeagleBone Black/Green. You supply the Beagle with 5V power supply, antenna, internet connection, and optional GPS antenna. Simple Beagle software installation from supplied micro-SD card. Additional worldwide at-cost shipping available (see text)

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    Ships to Anywhere in the world
    91 backers
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  4. Select this reward

    Pledge $299 or more About $299

    KIT: A more complete installation kit including KiwiSDR installed on a BeagleBone Green inside an enclosure, magnetic mount GPS antenna and pre-installed KiwiSDR software on the Beagle (backup supplied on micro-SD card). Hook up an antenna, 5V power supply, plug into a DHCP-capable network and you're ready! With a little more configuration users from around the world can access your KiwiSDR from the internet. Additional worldwide at-cost shipping available (see text)

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    Ships to Anywhere in the world
    169 backers
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Funding period

- (30 days)