Share this project

Done

Share this project

Done
Take a fledgling nation and grow it into an empire that will echo through the ages in this Domino based, Civilisation building game!
Take a fledgling nation and grow it into an empire that will echo through the ages in this Domino based, Civilisation building game!
1,928 backers pledged €116,993 to help bring this project to life.

The Road to Development...

Posted by Holy Grail Games (Creator)
20 likes

Greetings Settlers !

While we’re waiting to reach our next Stretch Goal, we thought we’d take a little time today to tell you a bit more about the development process behind Dominations and how it became the game it is today! As you all know, Dominations was created by the same duo behind Museum: Olivier Melison and Eric Dubus. In the article below (which has also been posted to Board Game Geek), Olivier tells us a bit more about how the concept for Dominations was born, and how the game’s mechanics were developed over time. Let us know what you think, and we’ll post more content like this!

Since Dominations: Road to Civilization lauched on Kickstarter a few weeks ago, I’ve had a lot of questions about how Eric Dubus and I came up with the concept for the game - so here it is!

As any author will tell you, creating a game is rarely easy, and Dominations: Road to Civilization was no exception. Believe it or not, it actually all started off as a dream! No, really. I was in Grenoble, France at the time, away on a business trip with my colleague Jean-François. I had a bit of a restless night in my hotel room, which is nothing new for me - I’m a sleepwalker. In spite of that, I managed to drop off for long enough to have a dream, a dream about a brilliant new game concept! The rules seemed so clear, the mechanics so fluid. I almost wrote it all down the second I woke up, but it was 4 am, and I was sure that I would remember it all in the morning. But of course, I didn’t! All I could remember was a vague notion of hexagonal tiles with resources on them, placed one next to the other… Needless to say, it wasn’t much to go on.

I spent the whole trip home talking about the game with Jean-François, and we came up with the very first version of Dominations, which was originally called Hexagon.

I started working on Hexagon with my partner in crime, Eric Dubus soon after that. We came up with a more fleshed-out version of the game during the (long) drive back from the Cannes Games Festival. Our concept was a sort of medieval Age of Empire-style 4X game, in which each player took on the role of a God. The aim was to expand your kingdom by placing terrain tiles next to one another, developing new technologies in different domains and improving your kingdom with cities and guard towers.

Some of the earlier prototype cards from the first version of Dominations
Some of the earlier prototype cards from the first version of Dominations

Each tile produced a different resource: Forest for Wood, Mountain for Stone, Plateau for Clay, Swamp for Naphtha, Fields for Corn, and Desert for Glass.

Early prototypes of the tiles for Dominations
Early prototypes of the tiles for Dominations

Each player started off with 4 meeples: 1 Steward, 1 Marshall, 1 Trader and 1 Priest, which they would place on their first tile along with a level 1 City.

Meeples and Guard towers!
Meeples and Guard towers!

Each character had a different ability: the Steward could produce resources, the Marshall could attack other Kingdoms, the Trader could sell resources, and the Priest could convert other nations, and by doing so increase the Belief levels of your Kingdom. The player with the highest Belief gained a Divine Intervention power, which could be defensive or offensive.

The God powers gained by increasing your Belief
The God powers gained by increasing your Belief

The game lasted at least 2 hours and was pretty fun, with lots of crafty moves and backstabbing. It was a very classic game in terms of the types of resources produced and technologies available.

After 3 months of development and several prototypes, the game worked well. But to be perfectly honest, it was all a bit…well…stuffy. Moreover, we had wandered far from the original idea behind Hexagon - which was to create a game that was deep without being complex. Eric and I have been big Eurogame players for a long time, and we’ve played just about every civilisation game out there. We wanted to make something different, offer something that we’d never seen before. Hexagon just wasn’t it – we’d fallen back into all of the old tropes that had already been done better by so many other games before. And so, Hexagon ended up in our cupboard of forgotten projects, to be returned to at a later date.

And so Dominations went into hibernation...but not for long
And so Dominations went into hibernation...but not for long

And yet, it seemed like we just couldn’t let this one go. We kept returning to the project, and after hundreds of hours of discussion, we eventually came up with the idea of using triangular dominoes to produce resources. The aim was still to keep the base mechanic of the game as simple as possible: play a domino to gain resources, then spend them to build cities and gain new technologies.

But we also wanted a game that would - thematically - cover huge stretches of time, and really represent what building a civilisation is all about: the accumulation of knowledge, the formation of culture, and the mark left on history. Which is why we decided that the resource that players were producing should be Knowledge, instead of wood or corn. After all, what’s a sheaf of corn in the life of an entire civilisation? These resources are a means to an end, but have little effect on a scale of thousands of years. The concept was a little abstract, but we both loved it. That’s how the current idea behind Dominations came into being. The game is about building your own civilisation over the course of 3000 years – from the Iron age to the 1000 AD. Each player guides their nation through time, building their civilisation based on the principles described by Gordon Childe in Urban Revolution: the presence of Cities, the organisation of state, the accumulation of knowledge and the creation of great artistic monuments.

We started with the goal of creating the kind of game that we would have loved to buy in our local game store! The end result was a game with a strong historical theme (which we both love), that was simple and fluid (which Eric loves) and yet very strategically deep (which I love). A bit of the best of both worlds really. We’re so happy with the way that Dominations: Road to Civilization has turned out, as we feel it offers something to players like us who are looking for a Civilisation game that’s a bit different.

The placement of the dominoes represents the growth of your population, their physical presence on earth. This growth allows them to come into contact with other peoples and gain more Knowledge, the game’s resource. The types of Knowledge that you gain will determine upon which principles your nation is built, the cities and monuments you build, and the skills that will form your culture.

The mechanic for placing the Mastery cards is as simple as that of the dominoes: match the colours of Nodus and optimize your Tree to gain more points! At the end of the game, your Tree will tell the story of your Civilisation over thousands of years. And yet, behind these very simple mechanic is a lot of depth - Dominations offers so many ways to score points and ultimately win.

Dominations has been a long time coming, and there have been a lot of hiccups along the way! The game has been a challenge in many ways, from achieving the right balance for the mechanics to making it graphically appealing. If you haven't yet, take a look at the first prototype videos of Dominations to see how far we've come: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guEtl1R3XYU&t=16s. I hope to write a few more of these to tell you all a bit more about how we designed and balanced the mechanics of the game, as well as how the visual design has evolved since the first prototypes.

A huge thank you to the whole Holy Grail Games team, as well as Team Kaedama, who have been such a huge help with developing the game and turning it into something really great!

Olivier Melison

Bonjour à tous,

En attendant d'atteindre notre prochain Stretch Goal, prenons le temps aujourd'hui de parler du processus de développement derrière Dominations, et comment le jeu est devenu ce qu'il est aujourd'hui!

Comme vous le savez, Dominations a été créé par le même duo derrière Museum, Olivier Melison et Eric Dubus. Dans l'article ci-dessous (qui a également été partagé sur Tric Trac), Eric nous parle de comment le concept du jeu a pris vie et évolué au fil du temps. N'hésitez pas à nous dire ce que vous en pensez, et nous demanderons d'autres articles de ce type aux auteurs!

 Au commencement était le rêve... d'Olivier

L'aventure de Dominations a commencé comme dans un rêve. En fait, non : elle a débuté dans un rêve. Olivier se trouvait à Grenoble avec son collègue Jean François pour un déplacement professionnel. Dans sa chambre d'hôtel, sa nuit fut agitée, comme bien souvent : il est somnambule. Malgré tout, dans ce piètre sommeil surgit un rêve merveilleux : il s'agissait d'un nouveau projet de jeu, d'une fluidité inégalée, aux règles limpides comme de l'eau de roche. Immédiatement réveillé, il a pensé à mettre le tout noir sur blanc pour ne pas laisser filer une telle idée!

Cela dit, il était quatre heures du matin, et il était certain de se souvenir de ces lumineuses règles à son réveil. Il s'est donc rendormi du sommeil du juste, très content de ses idées. Quelques heures plus tard, il a ouvert les yeux. Impossible de se souvenir de ce jeux génial dont il avait rêvé toute la nuit. Evaporées, les règles claires et limpides. Le seul vestige du songe dont il se rappelait était une vague histoire d'hexagones qui se plaçaient les uns à côté des autres avec des ressources dessus ; autant dire pas grand-chose...

Jean François et Olivier ont passé leur voyage de retour à discuter de ce jeu, et écrit le premier jet de ce qui allait devenir Dominations. Bon, avant, ça s'appelait Hexagone...

Au milieu était l'Hexagone, mais bon...

Par un beau mois de Décembre bien neigeux comme la Lorraine sait en produire, nous avons démarré avec mon comparse de toujours le développement d'un jeu qui s'appelait alors Hexagone. Les grandes lignes avaient été jetées lors d’un (long) retour du salon du jeu de Cannes. C'était une sorte de jeu 4X à la « Age of Empire » médiéval, où chaque joueur incarnait un dieu. Il s'agissait d'étendre son royaume en développant de nouvelles zones de production qui se plaçaient de manière adjacente à une tuile déjà posée, de développer de nouvelles technologies dans différents domaines et d'améliorer son royaume par de nouvelles cités ou tours de garde.

Les premières cartes d'Hexagone
Les premières cartes d'Hexagone

Chaque tuile générait un type de production : la Forêt fournissait du bois, la Montagne de la pierre, le Plateau de l'argile, le Marais du naphte, les Champs du blé, et le Désert du Verre.

Les tuiles pour production de ressources
Les tuiles pour production de ressources

Chaque joueur démarrait avec 4 meeples : 1 pion Régisseur, 1 pion Maréchal, 1 pion Colporteur et 1 pion Evêque, qu'il plaçait sur son premier territoire avec un niveau de cité.

Des Meeples et des Cités!
Des Meeples et des Cités!

Chaque personnage possédait un pouvoir : attaquer d'autres royaumes pour le Maréchal, produire des ressources pour le Régisseur, vendre des ressources pour le Colporteur et convertir des peuples adverses pour l'Evêque (ce qui permettait d'augmenter la piété du royaume et, pour le joueur dieu incontesté de ce bas peuple, d'intervenir sous la forme d'un pouvoir plus au moins destructeur).

Les cartes d'intervention divine
Les cartes d'intervention divine

Le jeu durait au moins deux heures, le tout dans une joyeuse atmosphère pleine d'alliances et de fourberies. Il restait très classique quant aux formes de production avec des matières premières avec des évolutions de technologies et de connaissances. Après 3 mois de développement et plusieurs versions du prototype, le jeu fonctionnait bien mais était - pour être franc - un peu laborieux. Il s’était surtout éloigné de l’objectif de départ que nous nous étions fixés, à savoir allier richesse de jeu et simplicité réelle...

Au placard!
Au placard!

C’est ainsi que notre « civilisation-hexagone » est tombé dans l’oubli et a rejoint dans leur armoire magique nos (nombreux) projets à améliorer ou à réinventer...

A la fin étaient les Dominos

Et puis, un beau jour, après une longue gestation dans l’inconscient surproductif d'Olivier et dans celui plus limité et basique de votre serviteur, le déclic s'est produit sous la forme d’un domino productif civilisationnel triangulaire (oui l’expression est bizarre...) qui nous permettait une véritable réflexion stratégique dans la production de connaissances et la construction d’une civilisation, tout en restant dans une mécanique simple : je pose un domino, je produis des connaissances, je construis et je développe ma civilisation.

La recette fût complexe. Mettez 200g de Advanced Civilisation et 100g d’Illuminati dans un mixer, ajoutez quelques pincées de Populous et de Nations. Laissez reposer. Saupoudrez avec quelques dizaines ou centaines d’heures de discussion. Ajoutez quelques amis au mélange pour les avis extérieurs (souvent éclairés). Enfournez le tout pour obtenir un prototype bien léché (bravo Olivier !) et le tour est joué ! Dominations, dont le dressage fut rapide mais la cuisson fort longue. Tout un plat très prometteur dont la création fût chaotique, mais nous avons cette exigence de ne pas produire un jeu s'il ne nous plaît pas vraiment. C'est l'avantage (et la chance !) d'être motivés par l'amour du jeu plutôt que de devoir travailler sur commande pour des impératifs financiers. Comme pour notre premier jeu édité, Museum, nous avons essayé de créer un jeu que nous aurions adoré acheter si nous l'avions trouvé dans le commerce ! Un équilibre entre un jeu simpliste dans son fonctionnement (comme je les aime !) avec de multiples possibilités de stratégies différentes vers la victoire, et une profondeur réelle (comme Olivier les aime !).

Je vous incite à regarder les premières vidéos que nous avions faites au début du travail éditorial pour voir la différence avec le jeu aujourd'hui. https://youtu.be/P_29ej9AGVQ

A la fin de la fin, il y a la conclusion !

Pour réduire tout ça au plus simple, d'un point de vue thématique, il s'agissait de créer un jeu de civilisation depuis l'Âge de Fer jusque l'an 1000. Chaque joueur y guide un peuple qui va évoluer d'âge en âge pour constituer une civilisation, sachant que pour qu'il y ait civilisation on doit retrouver dans le jeu certaines caractéristiques comme la présence de villes, l'organisation d'états, des réalisations artistiques monumentales ou bien encore des connaissances, comme l'a si bien décrit Gordon Childe dans Urban Revolution.

Le placement des dominos, avec sa mécanique simple de combinaisons de couleurs, représente la croissance physique de votre peuple.

Cette croissance les permet d’interagir et d’apprendre les uns des autres, générant ainsi des Connaissances, la ressource principale de Dominations. Le type de Connaissances que vous générerez déterminera les principes sur lesquels votre nation sera bâtie, les Merveilles et les Cités que vous construirez, et les Savoirs qui viendront former votre patrimoine culturelle.

Le placement des cartes de Savoir reflète en partie la même simplicité que celle du placement des dominos : matcher les couleurs pour obtenir encore plus de points ! Derrière tout cela, il y a énormément de façons d’obtenir des points de victoire, une masse d’opportunités stratégiques à exploiter, un puits sans fond de possibilités…

Juste pour vous dire enfin que pour nous un jeu ne se construit pas de façon linéaire. Le parcours est poussif, long, tortueux, parsemé d'échecs, d'insatisfactions, de prototypes remis en cause dès le premier test, de discussions interminables (mais passionnantes), de défaites (dans mon cas, trop fréquentes... merci Olivier !). Travailler à la création d'un jeu, c'est un peu comme pour un film ou un roman...

Pourtant, au final, tous ces efforts, toute cette sueur, tout cela est oublié quand on voit des joueurs prendre du plaisir à y jouer (encore et encore), et nous suivre dans cette grande et périlleuse aventure qu'est un KICKSTARTER, procédé grâce auquel toute l'équipe de Holy Grail (Jamie, Georgina, Loïc, Quentin, Owen et nous) est libre de faire le jeu qu'on souhaite et pas celui qu'on nous imposerait. MUSEUM nous l'a prouvé, Domination nous le confirme aujourd'hui. Merci à tous et amusez-vous bien.

Nous reviendrons dans un autre carnet d'auteur plus centré sur la mécanique et les évolutions du jeu que nous avons apporté avec nos amis de Kaedama (Merci à Antoine, Corentin, Ludovic et Théo)

Eric Dubus

Niklas Nord, Philipp, and 18 more people like this update.

Comments

Only backers can post comments. Log In
    1. Missing avatar

      Niklas Nord
      Superbacker
      on

      Thank you for this!
      So excited to recieve and play the game :)