Project image
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$717
pledged of $10,000pledged of $10,000 goal
17
backers
Funding Unsuccessful
The project's funding goal was not reached on Thu, March 12 2015 3:32 AM UTC +00:00
$717
pledged of $10,000pledged of $10,000 goal
17
backers
Funding Unsuccessful
The project's funding goal was not reached on Thu, March 12 2015 3:32 AM UTC +00:00

About

Warden is a multiplayer survival-horror game that pits you against a deadly shapeshifting demon controlled by one of your friends! To survive the demon’s predations, you’ll need to work together with the other Wardens on your team to evade and fend off the monster.

The demon is exceptionally dangerous, but the Wardens are not completely helpless. Each Warden has a unique skillset that allows them to fight, hide, and track their way across the map to each unholy altar in need of destroying. Only by destroying these altars can the Wardens completely exorcise the demon from the physical world.

Each time an altar is destroyed, the demon is destroyed temporarily and reforms as a completely different type of enemy, each with wildly different abilities. To survive each form, you'll have to figure out what you're up against and adapt your strategies accordingly. Should you fail to do so, you'll soon find yourselves with a lot of dead Wardens on your hands.

Warden requires multiple players, preferably between four and six. Get a group of friends together before trying to play!

The Wardens are split up into three classes: the Tank, the Abjurer (formerly called the DPS), and the Seer.

The Tank, with his impressive fortitude and kiting abilities, is charged with keeping the demon away from his squishy teammates. To accomplish this, he wields a fiery lasso that can forcibly pull the demon towards him, as well as a powerful, short-range blast of fire that can repel the demon if it gets too close for comfort.

The Abjurer is the damage-dealer of the group. His long range attacks are far more damaging than those of the Tank or Seer, and can be used to bludgeon the demon back into the shadows. In addition, the Abjurer can place shield wards that, when triggered by proximity to the demon, erupt into a wall of flame, useful for blocking off passages and covering the Wardens' escape.

The Seer is a utility class, and lacks any significant means of dealing damage. He compensates for this with powerful debuffs in the form of blind and slow wards: when the demon triggers a blind ward, a burst of light prevents the monster from seeing for a short period of time, giving the Wardens a chance to escape back into the shadows. Slow wards, on the other hand, are more suited for combat. While the demon is slowed, the Abjurer can easily line up his attacks without the demon having a chance to evade them.

In addition, the Seer has another unique ability: darkvision. Even the most impenetrable of shadows fade away in the Seer's eyes, allowing him to slip past the Wardens' hunter without revealing himself.

Hunting the Wardens is a shapeshifting demon that can take on a variety of deadly forms. Fighting the demon head-on is dangerous, and, if you're on your own, suicidal. Only by working together will the Wardens be able to survive an attack.

Each time an altar is destroyed, the demon is forced into a new form, and each form has its own set of unique abilities. One form might be able to perceive movement in pitch darkness, another might gradually pick up on your scent if you stay still for too long. One might be a mighty juggernaut you can only hope to hide from, another might stalk you and strike when you least expect it.

Early on in development, I realized that Warden would quickly grow stale if it was limited to two or three maps. A few ideas were tossed around, and, after procedural generation was deemed too large of a task to implement, I settled on giving the players a map editor of their own.

While the editor, like the rest of Warden, is a work in progress, it currently allows users to place props that were used in the island level, sculpt and paint terrain, import heightmaps, and place spawn locations for Wardens, the demon, and altars; in short, everything necessary to make cool new levels to explore!

Don't fancy yourself a mapmaker? Fortunately for you, saved maps can be shared over the internet, allowing you to tap into the collective creativity of the entire player-base! Valve would be so proud.

You can play the game yourself! If, however, you are disinclined to download the game, round up some friends to play it, and set up a server without seeing it in action first, here's a video that may interest you:

If you would like to try out the game, you can find download links for both the PC and Mac versions of the game at Warden's IndieDB download page.

Remember: the game isn't finished, and the current release is only a demo. There's only one form for the demon, the Wardens abilities need balancing, and there are bound to be bugs here and there.

Free updates to Warden will be released to the public throughout Phase 1. Once Phase 2 commences, the game will be treated as an early-access game that's only available to Kickstarter backers and whoever buys the game through Steam.

 * The impact of horror is largely dependent upon mood, environments, and tension rather than danger (in other words, implying your character is in danger is more effective than actually putting your character in danger). If you compare dying in Five Nights at Freddy's to dying in Team Fortress 2, it's pretty obvious that we're more scared of an animatronic creeping up on us than we are of being blasted to pieces in a cartoony fashion by a drunk demolitions expert with only one eye, even though both make you equally dead. I've been focused on making gameplay work smoothly in Warden rather than trying to dial up the fear factor, and at this point in development my attention will shift more towards horror.

The team is actually just me. My name is John Kurnett. I'm a random guy from California who decided years ago that he wanted to make video games (about nine years ago, specifically). For a while I idly tinkered around with programming, but it was only five years ago that I really started focusing on learning game development. Since then, I learned programming, modeling, animation, a bit about music composition, and a variety of other skills needed to make games.

A year and four months ago, I started working on Warden. It's the first project I've worked on that actually reached the point where it could be considered a decent game in its own right, and I don't intend to let it die now.

I've gotten pretty far on student versions of software, but there comes a time when a developer needs to actually pay for stuff.

  • Paying for software (Unity, Maya, Mudbox, Adobe CC, etc).
  • Paying for hardware (a better drawing tablet, which will let me create more detailed, higher quality models and textures).
  • Paying for other miscellaneous stuff (web hosting, Greenlight's fee, and the plethora of random expenses that crop up when making a game that I'm unaware of).

I'm not coming to Kickstarter to try to hit the jackpot and rake in that sweet, sweet crowdfunding dosh for a piece of vaporware that consists of two pieces of concept art and a handful of ideas. I've invested thousands of hours in this project over the past year and four months. My only hope is that Warden has enough potential in your eyes that you will be willing to collectively make the investment necessary to let me transition this from a pet project into a fully-fledged game that's worth the full $10 that it will cost.

Without telling people about Warden, this Kickstarter is guaranteed to fail. I'm doing my best to publicize the project, but I can't do it all on my own.

If you want to see the final version of Warden as soon as possible, share this page on Facebook, Twitter, and any online communities you're part of! Every little bit helps more than you might expect.

Warden is on Greenlight! If you want to help the project succeed, login to Steam and upvote the game here.

Risks and challenges

This is my first project like this to reach this point, so everything beyond this is new to me. Even so, I've invested thousands of hours in Warden. The biggest risk at this point is that I'd screw something up badly and it'd take some time to sort out, but unless I'm horrifically injured and/or killed, Warden will be completed, however long it takes.

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  1. Select this reward

    Pledge $1 or more About $1.00

    For the low, low price of one dollar, you get both the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from being a good person and my eternal gratitude.

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    By funding ten dollars, you get a DRM-free copy of the game and all future updates.

    Steam keys for the game will be provided for backers once the game passes through Greenlight.

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    Pledge $25 or more About $25

    At the $25 level, you get four copies of Warden. While, given that the copies are DRM-free, you could technically fund $10 and share your reward with friends (if you wanted to be mean and hurt my feelings), the $25 reward tier includes four Steam keys for the game once it passes through Greenlight.

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Funding period

- (30 days)