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How can a Kickstarter success be translated into sales when your project is complete?

And when should a creator start thinking about this stuff — as part of pre-Kickstarter launch planning? When their project is live? Not until they have finished making the thing?

Kickstarter Last edited on
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Paul Roman Martinez
13-time creator
18
Answered on

I think a post campaign sales strategy is very important. For me, Kickstarter has always been used to pay for production. It's the sales after where I start making a profit. It is important to start thinking about it well before your campaign has launched. Who are the distributors that deal in your product, are there any local stores that would be interested, and what kind of trade shows can you attend to promote it?

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Terri Allred (Sadiya)
2-time creator
3
Answered on

One of my Kickstarter projects was producing an instructional DVD targeted to a niche dance community.  The Kickstarter campaign was finished about 6 weeks before we actually needed the funds for production.  We wanted to schedule a tight turn around so that we could keep our backers excited by posting photos and updates from the filming and production of the DVD. We then timed the release of the DVD with a major international dance conference.  Finally, we created a DVD Tour and started booking dates for live instruction.  Our backers have been enormously helpful in spreading the word about the project and scheduling live instruction in their communities.  Truly a Kickstarter success story!

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Ryan Dunlap
2-time creator
106
Answered on

It depends on how hands-on you want to be in the sales process. I focus on film and book publishing. There are some self-distribution companies that are eager to team up with creatives. VHX.tv discounts film delivery costs that are fulfilling backer rewards. For books, using Print on Demand (PoD) services like LightningSource Inc or CreateSpace has allowed my books to stay in digital retailers after I sent out the backer rewards.

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Doug Monahan
Creator
55
Answered on

Kickstarter campaigns can be used as PROOF to major retailers such as Walmart, Kmart, Target, JC Penney's and Sears that your product is viable. These chains never pick up any product and put it in all of their stores - but instead they do tests. They'll start your product off in low quantities in say 50 of their stores and see how they sell before they place your products in 250 stores, 500 stores, etc. BUT, if you have a very successful Kickstarter campaign, you can point out the success of the campaign and perhaps get Walmart to put your product in 250 stores from day one vs. 50. The point is that a successful kickstarter campaign is proof to major retailers that your product is viable. You should be thinking about this from day one - not after the campaign is finished. Remember, Kickstarter is just the very beginning - not the end game.

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eileen alden
Creator
10
Answered on

great topic, i am tackling this right now.

i used shopify as my e-commerce launching pad because it was fast and i like their mobile app. we had a plan in place to begin with release of a short intro comic first, followed by our merch, item by item, so it gives us something newsworthy to talk about incrementally, as we prep to launch Issue #1. we have some different merch reserved for this purpose which is different than the kickstarter offered rewards, also to keep things fresh.

this is just our way to anchor with our home base online store as we hope to publish through a creator-owned comic publisher.  

we are also still debating pros and cons of offering a comic reader. my first comic is published on the madefire app which is great because it allowd in-app purchases via itunes. they are great guys there and i would recommend them, even if you aren't doing motion comics.

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John Wrot!
11-time creator
495
Answered on

This is a must for pre-campaign thought.  How many pledges do you need to reach your goal?  How many left-overs from the production run will you have left over for sales?

Unless you don't care to have sales post-kickstarter.  You don't NEED to kickstart a BUSINESS here, but that usually is the case, and you'll need to know how many post-campaign sales you need in order for them to become self-sufficient.

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george yap
3
Answered on

This clothing line will take sometimes for the customer mentality to accept the appreciation of much better than the present one (Here ,Is From HIlls Product for over 50 years)

The sales is to advertise to people(giving out flyers,cost effective advertisement)because I used it myself and I know I quite enjoy doing my laundry everytime I want to do my washing, on purpose.

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Paul Jones
0
Answered on

I think you should make sure you allot some advertising dollars in your KS campaign. You can have some places selected so that when your campaign ends you can focus on the next step, advertising and selling your product.

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Douglas Sun
10-time creator
21
Last edited on

It's probably hard to formulate a realistic plan for incorporating Kickstarter into your business model until you have been through your first campaign and you can judge the actual market here for whatever it is you're doing. But if you expect your project to have a life beyond Kickstarter, then Kickstarter has to be just that — part of your business model. Which means that you need to have an idea of how Kickstarter figures into your overall plan right from the start.

Unless you want to be like the Underpants Gnomes and leave the part between "collect underpants" and "profit" a blank.