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Any tips on what to do 48 hours after launch?

Bjorn Greipsland Last edited on
9 answers
Campus is now read-only.

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Alex Eames - RasPi.TV
8-time creator
353
Last edited on

Bjorn please don't buy services from people who solicit you through the KS message system. In fact, I'd go further and report them as spam using the facility provided. This will help KS to weed out the accounts of people who do this.

(Edit March 2017) I see the question has been edited to remove references to marketing solicitations. Well they were there when I originally answered the question. Also - I've got a campaign ongoing at the moment and am receiving a lot of solicitations. I'm in the "flatlining" middle period which is pure agony, but I'm holding onto my own advice and reporting every single one. But I really really understand why some people might actually be desperate enough to be tempted by these offers. Don't buy from spammers! It really is that simple. :)

4 comments

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Elly Blue
27-time creator
29
Answered on

Hey Bjorn,

My sense is that while it helps to be featured on Kickstarter internal pages, those features will only ever add up to a few percent of your goal, unless it's like front page treatment. At this stage, it's good to make sure that you'll find the random Kickstarter browsers by making sure that your project is searchable  -- eg, you use all the key words in your description that potential supporters might be looking for. And promote the heck out of it externally of course.

I strongly advise not buying marketing from the people who solicit you on Kickstarter. If you need outside PR help, get a recommendation for a person or company from someone who has successfully worked with them.

E

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John Wrot!
11-time creator
495
Answered on

Bjorn,

Keep at it.  You're early on.  Promote now, and you'll see fruit down the road.  For this, or any future projects.  Immediate promotion does not always result in immediate conversions.

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Jason Young
Creator
48
Answered on

The best tip I can offer is at 48 hours, your campaign is just a baby. Give it nourishment, attention, don't expect it just to happen because it's out on the worldwide web.

Like with anything, you get back what you put out. A week from now your campaign will be at teenager level, and stuff will start happening if you work it HARD and SMART now, today.

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Erica Wisner
Creator
4
Answered on

The #1 thing you can do is go look at successful (and failing) campaigns in your same general category, and see what you can learn about what separates the good from the bad.  You can use your own style, but try to be more like the good ones (short video, humor or lively presentation, good images, attractive rewards). 

Keep thinking about PR, and consider searching for blog posts, journal articles, reviews, etc. for those other successful campaigns.  If you see something you like, try that.

Regarding playing the video on FB: 
I accidentally found out that FB is not reliable about playing GIF animations. 
Annoying, as I'd made some cute ones for my campaign - but it opens the option to say: "Please click the link to see my cute animated update!" or blog or whatever. 

If your video doesn't get across what you need to get across for people to click and pledge, consider improving it.  You can still upload a new video.  I will not be doing this (it took me a year and a half and a lot of help to put together the video we have), but for those with in-house video skills or a sloppier first attempt, it's an option.

Regarding things that seem to be helping - most creators seem to recommend doing your own PR.  A few have suggested Kickbooster (lets your backers get a referral bonus), and one friend said they used GreenInbox but only saw a few hundred uptick from that.  Jeff Walker's "Product Launch Formula" has useful suggestions about how to approach your audience so they get a good sense of the value you're offering and are more likely to snap it up.  Creating your own Facebook ads, guest blog posts, and press releases seems to get just as good a results, for less money. 

Of course, it's work.  But that's how you earn your success.

-Erica
(p.s. I find it a LOT easier to write the good advice I've been told, than to go do it. 
My default personal standard is "3 things per day" - whether that's connecting with someone with a good mailing list, fixing or improving the Kickstarter landing page, or posting an ad.  If I can get in 3 dozen, so much the better.

If anyone's working in green, DIY, or survival markets, or just likes a good How-To book with cartoons, I'm up for cross-promotion efforts.)

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Dustin
Creator
21
Answered on

Consider using the social media tools like Twitter, Instagram (with a bunch of kids using your product), Facebook etc.  If you aren't much of a social marketing fiend, try to have friends or family offer you assistance.  My wife and sister love that stuff and have helped me out tremendously!

Identify strong hashtags with Twitter and Instagram then keep the media flowing through it.  I've had the same question with the featured category and unfortunately I don't have a clue about it! 

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IronSpike
20-time creator
153
Answered on

 Ha ha, basically? Never shut up about your project. Tweet about it, post to Facebook, post to Tumblr,  post to Instagram, tell everyone you know. Email your family, email your friends. Look for excuses to talk about your project online everywhere it might be appropriate.  Invent milestones ("Wow everyone, we hit 50 backers today!"), invent short-term goals ("Let's get to $500 today!").  No one will promote your work as enthusiastically and competently as you can.

 And yeah, to echo the sentiments of everyone who has posted before me; ignore solicitations from dedicated Kickstarter promotion people that randomly show up in your PM box.  At best, all these people will do is email a link to your project to a list of 500 blogs and journalists, which will be thoroughly ignored.  It takes absolutely nothing to set yourself up as a "Kickstarter promoter," outside a mailing list and a form letter.

 If it makes sense for your project, you might want to consider sending out press releases; there was a time when just having a Kickstarter project would be enough to get you coverage, but that's not so much the case anymore, so make sure to highlight whatever it is that makes your project special. 

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Hope Nicholson
9-time creator
6
Answered on

Hi Bjorn, it's always a good idea to look for innovative ways to promote your campaign, short videos that showcase your excitement are cool ways to get people interested, or sneak peeks at the progress. Anything with visuals will be more interesting to social media viewers than just lines of text/links.

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Kathryn Coster
Creator
8
Answered on

I'm cross posting this answer from another question in case it helps anyone new (and because I'm super pleased with myself for my idea!)

I'm really excited to share something that I literally just finished. I've made a quiz that can be shared to market my campaign. I've literally just published it (here) so I've no idea how much actually interest it will convert but it's loads of fun to do. I used Riddle with a free 14 day trial and it was super easy, but Playbuzz also looks good too. My product really lent itself to a personality type quiz (which XYZ are you?) but I am sure there are loads of other ways you can be creative with it. You can embed a twitter widget in it, and add links to your campaign in the text. It's probably a good idea to do before your campaign launches to collect email address, you can link it up with Mail Chip, and add a landing page. Worth a shot