The Kickstarter Blog

An Interview with De La Soul's Dave AKA Trugoy the Dove

  1. Introducing Google Analytics — and an inside look at the creator dashboard

    If you’ve never launched a project on Kickstarter — or if it’s just been a while since your last — you might not know about all the tools and data waiting for creators behind the scenes.

    Take the project dashboard, for instance. It’s pretty much Mission Control for monitoring everything going on with a project, with at-a-glance tracking of key data: funding, top referrers, reward breakdowns, even a continuous feed of all project activity. It’s our way of making sure everyone has all the information they need to run a great project, while keeping the whole thing simple and intuitive enough that creators can focus their energies on, you know, creating.

    There are some, however, who need even more advanced, more granular methods of monitoring their projects. That’s why we’ve now enabled creators to connect their projects to Google Analytics. It’s simple and seamless — just add a Google Analytics tracking ID to any Kickstarter project, and all the right data will flow over for analysis. For larger, more complex projects, it opens up a whole new world of trusted, powerful tools, from custom reports and dashboards to the ability to track how many visits to the project page are converting into pledges.

    It’s just one of a host of new features and upgrades we’ve been rolling out for creators over the past months, from big changes to small improvements — things like shipping tools, spotlight pages, easier payment setup, and subtitles and captions. And of course there’s still a terrific suite of data already waiting on every project’s dashboard, no setup required. Never seen it? Here’s a quick spin through what’s available.

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  2. Discover Webcomics

    Picture a comic. Assuming you don't immediately think of a person that practices comedy in some form, you probably picture a newspaper comic strip or a stapled, magazine-style comic book. It's the beauty of the format. You can do whatever you want with the structure built into the medium.

    But what about webcomics? For as long as they've been around (longer than you think! The first webcomic was actually distributed through Compuserve) no one's ever been quite sure what to do with them. Do you treat them as you would any paper comic, only on a screen? Or do you use the freedom of that screen to push boundaries? To make them interactive? To take what was printed on the web and convert it to an actual, physical book? True to comics history, rather than figure out one definitive way, all manner of work in all manner of format is available to read online, and if looking at hundreds of these projects a day tells us anything, it's that the community around webcomics is thriving just as much as the projects themselves. Here's a few that are live right now.

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