The Kickstarter Blog

Ouya’s Big Day

Yesterday a video game project called Ouya became the eighth project in Kickstarter history to raise more than a million dollars, and the fastest ever to do so. Ouya hit the total in just over eight hours, shattering the previous record. Here’s how long it took each million-dollar project to cross the threshold:

  1. OUYA — 8 hours and 22 minutes
  2. Double Fine Adventure — 17 hours and 30 minutes
  3. Pebble — 27 hours
  4. Wasteland 2 — 41 hours
  5. Shadowrun Returns — 7 days
  6. The Order of the Stick — 27 days, 5 hours
  7. Amanda Palmer — 27 days, 12 hours
  8. Elevation Dock — 57 days

As you might expect, Ouya also has the biggest single-day total in Kickstarter history. It received more than $2.5 million in pledges from its launch on Tuesday at 8:44am to Wednesday at 8:44am. Here are the ten biggest 24-hour tallies on Kickstarter so far:

  1. OUYA — $2,589,687.77
  2. Double Fine Adventure — $1,064,652.05
  3. Pebble — $863,132.92
  4. Wasteland 2 — $555,407.84
  5. Shadowrun Returns — $378,008.28
  6. Amanda Palmer — $223,348.50
  7. The Icarus Deception — $178,194.00
  8. Elevation Dock — $161,507.00
  9. Penny Arcade Sells Out — $151,221.17
  10. gTar — $138,891.00

Ouya’s big day lead to another Kickstarter record: dollars pledged in a single day. On February 9th Kickstarter saw more than $1 million in pledges in a day for the first time. Until yesterday, Kickstarter's biggest day was on April 12th, when nearly $1.9 million was pledged. The amount pledged yesterday, July 10th? $3,174,820. 

So what is Ouya, you ask? Ouya is a game console built on the Android operating system. Its creators pitched it as a platform for independent developers, and it clearly has big potential. In just 24 hours, 20,000 people bought an Ouya console — a product they had never heard of before yesterday. By way of comparison, Microsoft sold 326,000 Xbox 360 consoles in its first week after many millions of marketing dollars.

Congratulations to the Ouya team and their backers on the incredible debut!

Comments

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      Creator Paul Moss on July 11, 2012

      I love it that these people are getting such good funding. But it just seems that a lot of video game developers are getting a lot of money...and by the production value of some of these videos, it gives me the impression that they've got enough resources as it is.

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      Creator Christopher Scanlan on July 11, 2012

      Talk about Priorities!

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      Creator Reedy on July 11, 2012

      Glad to see the Kickstarter website didn't succumb to major load! No /. effect for you! :D

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      Creator Zachary Peterson on July 11, 2012

      What a great product and a great way to raise funds! And Kickstarter didn't break a sweat. Gotta love it.

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      Creator Wing Wong on July 11, 2012

      Congratz to Ouya. Hopefully, it doesn't turn out to be another Indrema. Also agree, Kickstarter's got some seriously sound architecture to hold up to the constant barrage. Good engineering.

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      Creator Jonathan Dahan on July 11, 2012

      wish you could use something other than amazon payments to help fund indie development like this...

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      Creator Grateful Chics Joy & Claire on July 11, 2012

      Congratulations! This is so encouraging and wonderful to hear about people in the communities co-creating people's dreams!!! Even though Grateful Chics project is nothing like this, we hope to receive generous pledges for our E-Book, App and Gratitude Journal in the next few weeks. Wish us great ABUNDANCE everyone!!! Oh, and check back in a few weeks for the Grateful Chics project...~Joy

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      Creator Grateful Chics Joy & Claire on July 11, 2012

      Oops, I am sorry, I just read AFTER I clicked Post comment that I was not supposed to mention our project. I sincerely apologize!

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      Creator Terry Gauchat on July 11, 2012

      Gee... nearly all these super successful "projects" are nothing at all like the original mission of Kickstarter. More and more these successes are just "pre-sales" of exciting new gadgets. This is the definition of "crowdfunding". When the rewards are nothing more than a purchase of a product at a discount, Kickstarter has become just another eBay, Amazon, or Etsy. What about sales tax? What about handling of returns, exchanges, significantly delayed delivery, or delivery of sub-par product that does not meet the specs described at the time of purchase ... I mean "funding"?

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      Creator suzanne demarco on July 11, 2012

      Great job! Awesomeness Kickstarter!!

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      Creator warren on July 11, 2012

      @Terry Gauchat: none of the "pre-sales" would exist if Kickstarter weren't there to help the exciting gadgets actually happen. The reward just happens to be "thanks to helping our gadget come to life, you get one!"

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      Creator Shane Schrupp on July 11, 2012

      Terry Gauchat, you're not forced to kick in any funds. You can also kick in money less than enough to receive a product, or if you really like the idea of a product do a huge favor and kick in money without even selecting a reward. Nobody is forcing you to do anything.

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      Creator Arthur Schmoul on July 11, 2012

      @Terry Gauchat

      Double Fine, Wasteland 2, Shadowrun Returns, OOTS, Amanda Palmer, The Icarus Deception are exactly the in the original mission of crowdfunding. Without the crowd money, there would never have been a new Adventure game by Double Fine, or a reboot of the Wasteland and Shadowrun games. Those three started from absolutely nothing, and asked money for games going to be delivered in moooonths, nothing apart of concept art being made at the time of the kickstart. And backers are being associated to the production of the games. Rich Burlew the guy behind The Order of The Stick said that he had problems finding a publisher or auto funding the printing of his anthology of webcomics, so that he had to ask the crowd to give him the money to do it, and ended doing a lot of other things also.
      While the Amanda Palmer and Icarus Deception are projects that struggled finding regular funding and so had to ask the people to show publishers and producers they can be wrong about some projects (well maybe not that much for the Icarus Deception).

      The Penny Arcade thing is different... it blurs the line between donations and funding of a web startup... so I'm reservated on this one... but cannot be described as a pre-sale of an exciting new gadget at all.

      So I only spot 4 projects in the two lists above that are indeed pre-sales of already almost finished gadgets. OUYA (but OUYA is quite different and also blurs a little the line of the almost ready gadget on pre-sale), Peeble, Elevation Dock, and gTar.

      But as you ask : what about "exchanges, significantly delayed delivery, or delivery of sub-par product that does not meet the specs described at the time of purchase" well. That's why it's funding and not purchase and we hope for a discount. Because there are risks. I've bought myself a small 10$ gadget on kickstarter that fall in the category you're criticizing, and it looked cool at the moment but when it was finally finished and shipped was actually sub-par. My bad. I should had investigated better, but I accept it.

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      Creator Mal Brood on July 11, 2012

      Personally, I dont back something just to receive something (that would be just making a purchase). I look for someone who is looking to create something and is passionate about doing it. I see it more as a donation, and if things work out well, they donate something back.

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      Creator Tahir Mansoor on July 11, 2012

      This comment has been removed by Kickstarter.

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      Creator Ber on July 11, 2012

      To those criticizing the use of crowd funding for Ouya, you need to understand something about game consoles: to be successful they must build up a critical mass of sold consoles very rapidly in order to prove to developers that there is a market that will buy their games (then good games come out, attracting more buyers growing the install base further and so the cycle goes on). The market is so hard to break into, Microsoft were hundreds of millions of dollars in the red for many years to break into the console market. So, the use of crowd funding for Ouya is an inspired move; without crowd funding there is absolutely no way they could have been successful. Even their numbers now are not yet enough they need to hit six figures of units preordered to attract professional devs - I suspect at the current rate of backing they probably will!

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      Creator przemyslslaw on July 11, 2012

      Thanks for sharing, very interesting!

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      Creator Steve the Pirate on July 11, 2012

      This is a perfect example of what makes America Great. Too bad our government has lost it's way.

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      Creator Brian Price on July 11, 2012

      @Paul Moss: Video games are difficult to get funding for as you have to prove a strong market for the game before a publisher will take it on. Why do you think when a game is successful it's brand is sequeled to death, and why do you think there are so many Call of Duty/Battlefield clones? It's because it's a type of game that is known to work.

      Unless you can project millions in sales, a major publisher is not going to back it. Yeah quite a few of these development studies have a few thousand dollars to fund for a professional looking video, but getting the few hundred thousand dollars to produce the game is a lot more difficult. Think about all of the investment into the game before a single dollar is returned. It's a huge risk, and it's understandable why publishers don't take it lightly (especially when 40-60% of software projects will fail before hitting release, let alone sales).

      Kickstarter has become a great platform for producing games. It allows developers to a) test the idea with the public and see how many are willing to buy; b) inject cash into the development of the game, and have quite a few secured pre-sales; c) bring the game to market without having to get involved with a major publisher

      Combine Kickstarter with Steam (which Valve appears they're trying to replicate with Steam's Greenlight) and indie developers and small shops can bring games to market so much easier.

      What I'm really hopping will happen is that development studios will start taking bigger risks in terms of ideas, concepts, and game types and bring these ideas to Kickstarter and Steam Greenlight. I'd love a FPS game that isn't trying to be like COD or Battlefield. We have enough of those.

      Case in point: remember the original Splinter Cell: Conviction? It was supposed to be about stealth and using the environment to evade and combat. The story was about Sam Fisher having left Third Eschelon and moving off the grid. Something happens and now some former terrorist group and the NSA are both after him. The whole concept of the game was to use the environment and crowds to escape police and enemies, and if you were cornered you'd smash them over the head with a chair, bottle, coat rack, or whatever was lieing around.

      UbiSoft scratched that idea and replaced it with a pseudo-stealth game that had been dumbed down to the point of crap. They didn't want to take the risk.

      Anyways, enough of my rant. I'm excited to see these projects on Kickstarter.

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      Creator Phillip Haydon on July 11, 2012

      @Steve - What does this have to do with America?

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      Creator George Chiramal Davis on July 11, 2012

      @Steve - what does this have to do with America? fr eg OUYA
      Is being funded from all over the globe not just america. I
      Understand we love our own country but try n make some sense.

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      Creator Honey Straws on July 12, 2012

      Wow, Ouya is really taking off. Interesting breakdown. Now what are the chances you guys will address the Penny Arcade kickstarter? It seems on its face to violate Kickstarter guidelines (no clearly defined project end, for business costs such as electricity and healthcare, will be repeated yearly to cover that years business costs) and yet not only was it pre-approved according to Gabe, it's a staff pick. If it isn't a violation of the guidelines, I'd really love to see you guys address how we're misunderstanding them. If it is a violation, I'd love to see an explanation of why it was allowed anyway.

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      Creator Phillip Haydon on July 12, 2012

      @Honey Straws - Are you referring to this one? http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/575109064/penny-arcade-sells-out

      It's completely stupid, should be removed from KickStarter.

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      Creator Kevin Wood on July 12, 2012

      Penny Arcade's project is really only on Kickstarter because its position in the marketplace. They could setup their own system to take donations/subscriptions, but it likely would not get the level of publicity and participation that hosting the project on Kickstarter has.
      Some kind of system in the vein of what John Allison for his comic, Bad Machinery, would be more fitting and I fully expect that future iterations will take this form.
      John Allison's Subscription experiment : http://scarygoround.com/subscriptions.php

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      Creator Sparknlaunch on July 12, 2012

      Really impressive result for Ouya and Kickstarter. The speed and money keeps increasing. Crowd funding is becoming a viable option for any project/startup. http://sparknlaunch.wordpress.com/2012/07/12/kickstarter-ouya-raises-1million-in-8-hours-and-22-minutes/

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      Creator Tahir Mansoor on July 12, 2012

      So happy for Ouya and Kickstarter. Didn't know crowd funding has become so popular and EFFECTIVE!! damnthatsghetto dot com.

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      Creator cesar on July 12, 2012

      gotta have one freaking awesome want one now!!!!

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      Creator Benoit FOULETIER on July 12, 2012

      Hey Kickstarter, here's a small request: why not show the start date on the project page? Every time I see "x millions $, xx days to go", I'm wondering "but when did this start? how much time did it take to reach this?"

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      Creator lthornblad on July 12, 2012

      I'm sure most of their money will come from game sales on their network. A 30% cut seems a tad high to me, though.

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      Creator Jason Brouwers on July 12, 2012

      30% is standard for mobile markets. Its what android developers are used to by now as it is also the numberr that apple and google use

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      Creator Cory Crete on July 12, 2012

      I was very excited when I first read about Ouya, but I have to say after a few dozen real good questions and with only vague or no answers from Ouya, I starting to feel skeptical about this. I hope in the coming days Ouya takes this a little more serious and start answering some of the questions that matter, not just for consumers but developers as well. In the mean time I can be a little patient over it, as I'm sure they are still trying to get over their excitement of holy cow! Still I noticed the backing trend dipping, greatly especially today, so Ouya may want to start figuring out stretch goals and answers sooner rather than later if they want to smash over all records.

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      Creator Sean Spalding on July 12, 2012

      @Benoit FOULETIER Kicktraq can tell you that and more.

      http://www.kicktraq.com/projects/ouya/ouya-a-new-kind-of-video-game-console/

      There's also a Chrome extension that puts the Kicktraq graph on the Kickstarter page.

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      Creator AVIDideas on July 13, 2012

      I have always known they will go new heights!

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      Creator theblackorean on July 15, 2012

      I don't know about all of this. Let's say they do indeed sell this hardware for $99. It would take at least $50 to make. If it took any more, then that would be a bad business model. You want to make at least 50% profit.

      Let's say they only produce 250,000 units (this being a very low number), it would cost them at least $12.5 million just to produce it. Hell. I'll even drop the price of producing it to $30. It'd still take them nearly $7.5 million. That's just the cost of producing them. So you mean to tell me that all they needed was $1 million? I find that hard to believe. So disagree all you want. But numbers don't lie.

      I believe the developers of OUYA already have the money to develop and market the hardware. I think their debut on kickstarter was a clever way of drumming up interest as well as determining future success rates based on how many people wanted to see this happen (as opposed to hiring a bunch of focus groups and sending out surveys to see if people would buy their product.) Not only were they able to extrapolate future success rates, but they got $4 million and still counting in the process.

      Furthermore. Do you know how much it costs to buy an advertisement spot on a CHEAP network??? Depending on the time of day and the programming, it can cost up to $250,000 for just 30 seconds. Now, of course they don't need to do a TV spot or anything. But that is where I think this whole kickstarter thing comes into play. They are basically getting paid to advertise their future product. They've received OVER $4.8 million so far. That is completely absurd.

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      Creator Lasse on July 16, 2012

      As theblackorean wrote. This is absurd, or, on the other hand, incredible smart.

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      Creator Jonas Pettersson on July 16, 2012

      They can produce more consoles over time, and not all the units for all predictable future sales for day one. 1 million will give them 20 000 units to the ball rolling on day one. After that they can produce more units for sale, since the hardware seems fairly simple. That way they "might" not have a lot of money stored away but probably they have a bit to cover saleries and stuff like that.

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      Creator Dan Lief on July 17, 2012

      This comment has been removed by Kickstarter.

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      Creator David Collier on July 18, 2012

      As an ex games console coder. This is the best solution to the problem. I look forward to tinkering with this as soon as I get the kit and the sdk up and running. Hopefully there are enough libraries to produce games of good quality.
      Games titles such as Green Beret , Hypersports and ye ar kung fu are some titles of my legacy to the commodore c64 console.
      I have lots of other uses for this platform as well:-)

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      Creator Nathan on July 20, 2012

      I'm glad the majority of projects I have backed are being complained about by some people in this thread.

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      Creator skahn on July 22, 2012

      Is there going to be an update about what Ouya is going to use all the 'extra' funding for?

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      Creator Devonin on July 24, 2012

      That's one of the biggest problems with Kickstarter. They can use the 'extra' funding for absolutely anything they want, and are answerable to nobody for it in any way shape or form.

      When a project passes its funding goal, the project should be required to demonstrate a reasonable stretch goal that is doable, and requires the amount of money they say it will, or the project should be closed, funded, and everybody cheers.

      The way kickstarters that "catch on" end up funding the project and then just dumping arbitrary profit in the pockets of the people running it, people who could spend that money on hookers and blow for all the say the people donating have, really bothers me.

      If you can't demonstrate a reasonable and relevant use for "extra" funding, you shouldn't get it. You always have the option, once funded, to put up your own separate donation site for latecomers who'd still like to support.

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      Creator eric yeager on July 29, 2012

      Ouya sets off massive red flags. Why will people get fired for "working" on it? Why are the specs so outdated? Why won't the company accept funding from other sources? Does anybody working on this project have electrical engineering experience?

      People who are funding this... I am sorry... but you are flat out retarded. The fact that this project is getting so much money is laughable. I can't wait for August 11th, when everybody associated with this project mysteriously disappears.

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      Creator JC on July 31, 2012

      @ Eric Yeager square enix just signed with ouya with final fantasy III being a launch title. Also clearly engadget, and gizmodo's constant articles and tweets on the system seem to grow the believability in Ouya's success. My prediction for your prediciton is it will be left wanting...

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      Creator eric yeager on July 31, 2012

      @ Jonathan Cooper we'll see. I don't know the nature of their contracts with these 3rd party companies, but it still reeks of a quick pan handling cash grab IMO.

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      Creator Wiffledude on August 7, 2012

      eric yeager
      1.) Where did they say people would be fired for working on it? WTF?
      2.) Come on man, it's a *startup*, cut them some slack. Plus, you can actually run some pretty badass graphics on a Tegra3 if you're smart about optimizing, at least the level of Team Fortress 2
      3.) Yes, they have one of the lead developers behind the Amazon Kindle working on the OUYA.
      Give me any valid points as to why the OUYA is a scam?

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      Creator Wiffledude on August 7, 2012

      And plus, if this was a scam, wouldn't the specs be MUCH more up-to-date ;)

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      Creator Rick Phillips on August 8, 2012

      @Devonin - while I can at least partially agree with your comments about extra funding, I would point out that, at least in this instance, there is much less extra funding than it seems. If you look at the numbers, more than half of the money translates into a console sale, with a large majority of the backer total at or near the $99 level. Certainly there is risk involved in backing this (or any) project. Even if the OUYA team does everything right, things can still go wrong. I think it is up to the backer to do the research to decide if the risk is worthwhile. In the end this about helping a project you believe in succeed. Even though we have no control over it's use, the more funding they have, the greater their chances of success.

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      Creator Rob Choveaux on June 27, 2013

      If I knew then what I did now I would have pledged $20 and waited for the OUYA to arrive in stores as it would be quicker than what I am still waiting for!

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      Creator Ng Ka-Hoi on July 4, 2013

      OUYA does a great job by lying to its backers, who was unable to receive their console before OUYA was available for retail.

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      Creator zeitgen on July 12, 2013

      I guess, OUYA is also the biggest disappointment in Kickstarter history, isn't it?